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All-Time All-Stars show why every team having a representative is stupid

Jul 10, 2009, 8:34 AM EDT

Rob Neyer conducts an interesting exercise:
what would happen if you had to make an all-time All-Star team
following the same roster rules to which today’s All-Star are subject?
Specifically, a 33-man roster, picking from players’ individual
seasons, and a rule that every team — including historical teams like
the Boston Braves and New York Giants — has to have a representative.
The linked piece is for the NL selections. Presumably the AL will
follow later today.

Rob does a good job, but man, Chad Cordero of the Nats sure sticks
out, doesn’t he? Especially given that Bob Gibson’s 1968 season, among
many other excellent ones, is left off. Not that it’s Rob’s fault, of
course, because who else are the Nats going to have on that team?

Which leads me to believe that, in addition to simply being fun, the
point of this exercise is to show just how stupid the
every-team-has-to-have-an-All-Star rule truly is.

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