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Ortiz apologizes, MLB confuses

Aug 8, 2009, 12:30 PM EDT

As expected, this afternoon’s press
conference with David Ortiz was a big ol’ dud
. If anything, it was an
orchestrated performance by incoming union head Michael
Weiner, propped up by a statement released by Major League Baseball
this morning
urging “the press and the public to use caution in
reaching conclusions based on leaks of names, particularly from sources
whose identities are not revealed.” As Weiner stated during the press
conference, just because someone is included on the list doesn’t
necessarily mean that the player used a banned substance. Wha wha?




Big
Papi was legally bound from saying much, but he took the the
opportunity to predictably deny his use of steroids while apologizing
to the fans, his teammates and his manager:




“I
definitely was a little bit careless. I was buying supplements and
vitamins over the counter … but I never buy steroids or use steroids.”




“I’m
not here to make excuses or anything. I want to apologize to the fans
for the distraction, my teammates, my manager. We go into a situation
now, it was a nightmare to me.”




Meanwhile, Weiner — who looked like he fell out of bed and ran to the proceedings like Ferris Bueller — sounded all lawyery and unioney:



“Substantial
scientific questions exist as to the interpretation of some of the 2003
test results. The more definitive methods that are utilized by the lab
that administers the current drug agreement were not utilized by the
lab responsible for the anonymous testing program in 2003. The
collective bargaining parties did not pursue definitive answers
regarding these inconclusive results, since those answers were
unnecessary to the administration of the 2003 program.”




Weiner named Androstenedione — the supplement made famous by Mark
McGwire — as an example, pointing out that while it is a banned
substance now, it wasn’t in 2003. He also reiterated MLB’s contention
that eight players, and possibly more, of the 104 siezed by the
government in 2004 did not test positive for PEDs. And of those 96
remaining names, 13 were inconclusive and possibly include multiple
tests on the same player.

Well, if MLB’s intention was to make the whole controversy even more vague
and confusing — which I believe it was — mission frickin’ accomplished, guys. Isn’t there a game on or
something?

  1. Oscar - Aug 8, 2009 at 4:09 PM

    Can we please quit whining about the fact that people tested positive back in 2003? It was not against the rules at the time. There are laws in this country that prevent any criminal from being charged for a crime they committed that was not illegal at the time it was committed, so why is it ok to attack those who ALLEGEDLY used something (although they cannot say what it was, thus we don’t even know if it was a steroid) during a time that it was not a crime?
    Another issue that disgusts me is the leaking of the names by anonymous lawyers. I think it’s time that someone turn around and start leaking the names of the cowardly people who have been breaking the law and find out their opinion on having promised confidentiality stripped from them.

  2. Dave - Aug 8, 2009 at 4:15 PM

    Why do people keep saying steriods were notbanned back then? THEY WERE ILLEGAL TO HAVE. just because MLB did not ‘ban’ them the mere possession of them was against the law.

  3. Don - Aug 8, 2009 at 4:32 PM

    Until it comes out as true and is in black and white, I think everybody, especially sports writers and commentators should get off their high horses. Whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty? It makes me sick. If the players did this, then punish them accordingly, BUT WAIT UNTIL IT’S PROVEN!

  4. bh0673 - Aug 8, 2009 at 4:58 PM

    I agree it is time to put this behind us and move forward but I still think the whoever is leaking the names should be named and prosecuted. Maybe it is time the judge who sealed the list should grom a set and subpena slime like Selens Roberts and make her expose the snitch.

  5. bh0673 - Aug 8, 2009 at 4:59 PM

    I agree it is time to put this behind us and move forward but I still think the whoever is leaking the names should be named and prosecuted. Maybe it is time the judge who sealed the list should grom a set and subpena slime like Selens Roberts and make her expose the snitch.

  6. RIC - Aug 8, 2009 at 9:18 PM

    The FDA recently recalled a handful of supplements because some were found to contain steroids or synthetic steroid-like substances. Dating back to 2003, there are plenty more that have been yanked off the shelves for this type of thing.
    Testing positive because of something in a supplement is not the same thing as running to Johnny Juicer or Balco to obtain an edge.
    I’m inclined to give all of these guys the benefit of the doubt until we know exactly what they tested positive for or why they are on the list.

  7. filmdude - Aug 9, 2009 at 12:16 AM

    Did some players take supplements, HGH, and steroids to get an edge, or to recover from injury? Yes. Did they cheat? No.
    If you think otherwise, we should look at the cocaine era of the 80’s, and the amphetamine era of the 60’s… who knows when steroid use in baseball actually began.
    Can we drop this already? Or should we all act high and mighty, and continue to judge based on ILLEGALLY leaked information? Because we all know individuals in the media have no skeletons in the closet, and have always made the right choice.

  8. filmdude - Aug 9, 2009 at 12:21 AM

    Another high and mighty journalist, beating a dead horse.

  9. A Devoted Follower - Aug 9, 2009 at 1:55 AM

    “Can we please quit whining about the fact that people tested positive back in 2003? It was not against the rules at the time. There are laws in this country that prevent any criminal from being charged for a crime they committed that was not illegal at the time it was committed, so why is it ok to attack those who ALLEGEDLY used something (although they cannot say what it was, thus we don’t even know if it was a steroid) during a time that it was not a crime?”
    Please shut up until you know what you’re talking about.
    Baseball banned steroids in the ’90s. Look it up. They didn’t begin to enforce it until much later, but they were banned when Bonds, A-Roid, Ortiz, etc. took them.
    They’re also a controlled substance, making possession illegal.
    Illegal and banned by baseball.

  10. MikeNE - Aug 9, 2009 at 3:37 AM

    This is good stuff for sports writer people. It attracts alot of attention, is easy to write about and makes for great ratings and tons of hits on blogs like this.
    It doesn’t take a huge amount of brain cells to figure out that all of this is pretty much a great game for the writers, lawyers and blog interests and given the way things work it follows that they are somehow involved in “leaking” names a little bit at a time. This will play out over several years. Follow the money…Remember to follow the money.
    This whole thing is a Duck….meaning….If it looks like a Duck and it Quacks like a Duck then its probably a Duck.
    Between the media and the lawyers it just stinks like crap. I bet you that these fed “lawyers” are getting a kick-back for leaking this stuff.

  11. M Putvin - Aug 9, 2009 at 7:26 AM

    Here’s the thing. A number of substances have been banned but are not performance enhancing steroids. How many false positives have come up in the years?
    I call this a rush to judgement and the media once again blowing things out of proportion and to many people buy it.
    Notice how careful the media is in not coming out and saying steroids…

  12. RobWarwick - Aug 9, 2009 at 8:39 AM

    I am just so sick of this crap. I NO LONGER CARE!! I REPEAT…..I DO NOT CARE! And neither does anyone else based on attendence figures and TV viewership. SO ENUFF!
    There are only two names left in the sport that would actually surprise me and bother me if it were revealed they used performance enhancing drugs….Jeter and Griffey Jr. That’s it. Everyone else, it would not surprise me in the least. Nor do I care.

  13. Jim - Aug 9, 2009 at 9:24 AM

    All of the Baseball “people” need to get over the steroids controversy. The fans, players, managers,union, Bud Selig and managment, past players, etc…. For twenty years they were using steroids of one sort of the other. Everyone turned a blind eye. It wasn’t until high school kids started to use it, all of the other major league sports had a program and congress told Baseball you get one in place or we will did Baseball come up with a strong steroids program.
    By the way, I think all records should stand and those who qualify with or without steroids should get into the Hall of Fame. Baseball deserves it!

  14. Tom - Aug 9, 2009 at 10:41 AM

    Gee, just when he started taking his “vitamins” he saved himself from being released by Minnesota and all of a sudden began hitting hrs. Couldn’t field. If not for “vitamins” and a DH spot he’s unemployable in sports.

  15. Matt - Aug 17, 2009 at 12:48 PM

    When ARod’s name came out, not only was there no face-saving union rep to all but discredit the results of the 03 testing but he got on NATIONAL TELEVISION and admitted his faults and apologized, but when papi gets his the union reps come to his aid as quick as possible, when I’ve never seen a more obvious sign of one’s ‘roid use than papi’s season statline, while papi himself is going to sit behind worthless excuses and still get the majority’s support. If baseball’s union is going to defend one, they should have defended all the exact same the second any mention of any name from this list was leaked.

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