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Papelbon needs to speed it up

Sep 4, 2009, 9:20 AM EST

If he wants to avoid going broke, that is:

Jonathan Papelbon’s slow play once again drew the ire of Major
League Baseball, which fined the Red Sox closer today for taking too
long to deliver a pitch for at least the fifth time this season, an
infraction incurred Tuesday night.

The league fined Papelbon $5,000 for a failure to comply with a new
rule designed to increase the pace of games. Papelbon vowed he would
finally adjust to the rules while not allowing them to change his mound
approach.

Sox games are plenty long enough when Papelbon isn’t screwing around like this, so I hope the fines finally start to have some effect on the lad.

  1. Chuck - Sep 4, 2009 at 9:54 AM

    Doesn’t make sense that they keep picking on Papelbon. He isn’t nearly the slowest guy in the league and certainly not the slowest on the Red Sox. When Beckett gets into trouble, he can slow down to the point of making you want to scream. And how about Dice-K? Baseball needs to show some consistency with the this stuff. They still let batters take way too long. Do you really need to adjust your gloves when you’ve taken a ball and didn’t even swing the bat? These guys need to be reminded they’re playing baseball – not solving world hunger.

  2. maurice - Sep 4, 2009 at 12:16 PM

    he’s Red Suck… MLB should fine his behind just for that

  3. Tim - Sep 4, 2009 at 12:52 PM

    The guy pitches 1 maybe 2 innings at most when the game is on the line..who cares how long he takes as long as he blows a save.

  4. Koz - Sep 4, 2009 at 1:14 PM

    Hey, if his success is based on his routine, then so be it. If MLB wants him to speed up and he doesn’t I think the Red Sox will kick in 50 or 60 K for his annual fines. Fining him 5000 for this chicken-poo is like fining me 10.00 a year for drive 65 in a 60. I don’t think it’s gonna change anything. That said, Tim is absolutely right – he faces between 4 and 6 batters at most and more often just 3, and not every night. Yeah, chasing Pap really makes sense….it’s really gonna speed up the game…by the time he picthes, those fans who MLB are trying to please have already left the game. (I know this may be a TV contract issue, and if that is the case, Pap will figure it out. But more than likely in the off season; now I think hell just pay the fines.)

  5. PeterD1963 - Sep 4, 2009 at 1:42 PM

    Its all about having the air time needed for such big egoes!!!!

  6. Brian M - Sep 4, 2009 at 1:45 PM

    Not entirely sure about the rest of his games, but even the announcers at that particular game were wondering what was up. Papelbon wasn’t pitching anywhere near as slow as Okajima in that game…so why for the discrepency. If there’s a rule or something regarding how long a pitcher can take with their windup and delivery, then fine, I’m all about enforcing the rules, but fair enforcement across the board…not just for whichever pitcher you feel like penalizing that day.
    On top of that, the umps for the Rays/Sox games are retarded anyway. Both Rays and Red Sox players/pitchers are getting screwed by their calls. I vote we get rid of pitch calls via ump, and go with the Amiga Strike Zone, it’s 100% accurate, and not influenced by money.

  7. Steve - Sep 4, 2009 at 2:55 PM

    It’s not the speed of pitching or between pitches he’s being fined for. There is an established time limit from when a manager calls for the pitcher to when he actually starts pitching, and Papelbon is exceeding it routinely. He can afford to be fined every game if he likes, given his salary.

  8. Jack Marshall - Sep 4, 2009 at 3:34 PM

    1) The plate umpiring in the Sox-Rays series was just embarrassing.
    2) Papelbon is far from the slowest pitcher even in the Red Sox bullpen.
    3) Boy, what would the umpires have done to Jeff Gray?

  9. MarkMay - Sep 4, 2009 at 7:08 PM

    Maybe Papelbon needs to make a visit with the Oregon football player who punched the Boise guy http://bit.ly/legarretteblount
    great punch! I’m a Sox fan, but maybe MLB should raise the fine to have Papelbon respect it?

  10. Mark - Sep 4, 2009 at 8:35 PM

    Papelbon might be slowing the game but what about the constant leaving the box by players and fixing their batting gloves or the opposing manager changing pitchers 7 times in a game or the 3-5 minutes between innings for more and more ads.

  11. JD - Sep 4, 2009 at 9:14 PM

    I think MLB should take a look at the Yankees. Last time I looked, they have the longest average game time in both leagues. What about them stepping out of the batter’s box every 20 seconds. If you are going to have a time rule on the pitchers, make the batters stay in the batters box! …or place a team maximum on the # of time outs per inning – like ONE. PLEASE…what are they actually doing besides playing mind games with the pitcher. Bud Selig is as good a comissioner as Bush was a President!

  12. TR - Sep 4, 2009 at 11:25 PM

    …and I suppose the Yankee’s averaging an MLB best 5.77 runs per game wouldn’t have anything to do with the length of their games…

  13. len - Sep 5, 2009 at 1:59 PM

    JD ,your boy obama is having about as good a summer a your roid sox…. i guess losers tend to share the same trends.

  14. Jake SF - Sep 8, 2009 at 2:15 AM

    Has anyone put together a games-are-too-long argument that does not have anything to do with short attention spans and impatience? Long games can suck, sure, especially if you’re at the losing end of things, as well as too short if on the winning side. But does the length have anything over social comaraderie and beers, and Joe Morgan and his “and so forth and so ons”? Give me some peanuts and Cracker Jack and I’m fine. A lack of time constraints is what makes this game special. Right?

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