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Cito Gaston has lost the Blue Jays

Oct 2, 2009, 10:55 AM EDT

We knew the Blue Jays’ front office was a mess, but Ken Rosenthal explains that the clubhouse is no better:

The Blue Jays’ rehiring of manager Cito Gaston last season started out as a feel-good story, a link to the franchise’s back-to-back World Series titles in 1992 and ’93.

A mere 15 months later, the mood inside the Jays’ clubhouse has turned decidedly sour.

The players are fed up with Gaston and do not want him to return next season, according to multiple major-league sources.

“It’s nearly a mutiny right now,” one source says. “He has lost the entire team.”

According to Rosenthal, players are complaining about Gaston’s “old-school approach” and lack of communication, and that “certain Jays veterans bristle over reduced playing time.”

Those seem like an odd combination of complaints to me. Usually veterans are the beneficiaries of a manager with an old-school approach. As in they get a lot of undeserved playing time simply because they’re veterans.  Scanning the Jays’ roster, however, doesn’t reveal anyone who should be getting PT but isn’t. At least no glaring examples, and certainly no veterans.  Cito has a mediocre team and he’s deploying it in a more or less reasonable manner in my eyes.

But you still have to communicate to your players. And if the players hate him, even unreasonably so, it doesn’t matter how well he handles playing time.  A manager who doesn’t have his team’s confidence is 100% assured to be an ex-manager, because you can’t just go out and get new players.

Silver lining: it seems inevitable that J.P. Ricciardi is going to be fired. If he is, it will be easier to hire a good replacement G.M. if he’s also going to be allowed to bring in his own field manager rather than be stuck with old Cito.  If I’m running the Jays I fire them both and start fresh.

  1. Jeff Berardi - Oct 2, 2009 at 2:16 PM

    “A manager’s job is simple. For one hundred sixty-two games you try not to screw up all that smart stuff your organization did last December.” – Earl Weaver
    Cito was a savior on his way in, and he’ll be a goat on his way out. Of course, the Jays never had the talent to compete in their division at any point during his tenure. But why dwell on those kind of minor details? Keep [physical act of love]‘ that chicken, Toronto.

  2. Drew - Oct 2, 2009 at 2:23 PM

    Cito has a mediocre team and he’s deploying it in a more or less reasonable manner in my eyes.
    Kevin Millar hit third and started at third base TWICE this week. At no point should that be allowed to happen, be it the thick of a pennant race or playing out the string. Better options exist, but Cito continues going to Millar. Inexcusable.

  3. woody - Oct 2, 2009 at 5:43 PM

    Cito Gaston??? come on CC aka for “jerk with a computer” You need bigger names than Cito Gaston to keep up with your reputation of uhh, “all the nasty comments too numerous to mention”. After all 7 out of the TOP 10 most commented stories on “circling the bases” means nobody reads your stories, They just start their negative comments as soon as they see these famous names and your signature associated.

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