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Papelbon falters, Angels sweep Red Sox

Oct 11, 2009, 4:36 PM EDT

Mariano Rivera is the greatest of
all-time, but statistically speaking, there’s probably nobody else
you’d want on the mound with a lead in the postseason other than
Jonathan Papelbon. After all, he entered play on Sunday with 26
scoreless innings spanning 17 career postseason appearances, the most
in major league baseball history without allowing a run. Alas, his
streak came to an end on Sunday afternoon, as did the Red Sox season.




Papelbon inherited a jam from Billy
Wagner with two outs in the top of the eighth, and quickly served up a
two-run single to Juan Rivera, cutting the score to 5-4. Papelbon
managed to pick off pinch-runner Reggie Willits to kill a bit of the
momentum. The Red Sox even tacked on an extra insurance run in the
bottom of the eighth to give Pabelpon some extra breathing room heading
into the ninth. It wasn’t enough.




The Angels rallied for three runs on
three hits and an intentional walk, all with two outs in the top of the
ninth. The definitive blow — a two-run single to center by Vladimir
Guerrero — was set up by excellent at-bats by Chone Figgins and Bobby
Abreu. Before Sunday’s go-ahead hit, Guerrero had just one RBI in his previous 19 postseason games.




The Angels are now set to take on
the winner of the Yankees-Twins series on Friday night. As for
Papelbon, he needs to learn how to trust another pitch besides his
fastball.

  1. Charles A. Guerrero - Oct 11, 2009 at 5:35 PM

    As a member of the Angels nation, this victory was particularly sweet because the Angels finally beat the Red Sox in the playoffs.
    I am confident, although everyone will pick the Yankees, that the Angels will defeat the Yankees in 6 games. I went to an Angels v. Yankees regular season game in 2008 and numerous Yankee fans kept reminding everyone about their 27 world series titles. Who cares!
    That will not mean anything when the Angels beat your tails off.

  2. Fanamine - Oct 11, 2009 at 5:43 PM

    Funny how you speak and act exactly like the fans you attack. You do realize your predictions hold no more weight than any other fan. Being confident is fine, being a disingenious hippocrite is not.

  3. dj - Oct 11, 2009 at 6:59 PM

    It is justice that vlad drove in the winning runs of the game. He is the heart and soul of the angels, and hopefully, he will win a ring before he retires.He deserves it.

  4. frank pepe - Oct 12, 2009 at 12:11 AM

    i hope he doesn’t win a ring with the angels, because the red sox are my AL team and because this way he has a better shot at entering the HOF as an expo (my only team). that said, if he gets a ring, i’ll be happy for him, and him alone. and kendrick, that guy’s awesome

  5. hop - Oct 12, 2009 at 12:33 AM

    sorry charles the angels bullpen will fail big time on the big stage and fail they will so you better get used to that junior. Yanks over the dodgers in 5. Angels choke again

  6. Thomas C Kantha - Oct 12, 2009 at 3:28 AM

    It is just a sport and no one from the Yankees or Angles care a hoot about you as long as they get their fat salaries.Fans should wisen up.Tell me one player that is worth his salary.I appreciate my dentist and my baker who I know and who knows me.You sit in 40,000 plus stadium and scream your heart out as if they know you. hahahah.

  7. Jeff - Oct 12, 2009 at 9:17 AM

    Did anyone else notice the “deja vu all over again” for the Red Sox? In 1986 they had a two run lead over the Mets in Game 6 of the World Series and were three outs away from the title. With two outs and the bases empty in the bottom of the 10th, the Mets tallied three times (as did the Angels this weekend).

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