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Schilling Piles on Pedro

Nov 6, 2009, 8:55 AM EDT

It’s been five years since Curt Schilling and Pedro Martinez were less-than-perfectly-friendly teammates, yet old bloody sock can’t seem to let things go. After talking about how he didn’t care all that much for Pedro’s sense of humor and laid back personality back in Boston, Schilling brought some seriously oblivious irony to the table:

“You guys remember, when Pedro was here, Pedro played by different rules. And Pedro, to a degree, earned the right to play by different rules. But players that play by different rules and take advantage of those, that’s probably the only reason I ever had issues with Pedro. And it was not a big deal, I know people are going to make it a bigger deal than I’m making it. But the amount of respect and admiration and the loyalty and friendship I have with [Terry Francona] . . . I saw some things, from Opening Day leaving the ballpark in Tito’s first game here. There’s just little, crappy dumb stuff.”

And how didn’t Schilling play by different rules? How many stars write blogs with lots of critical content during the season? How many guys get a free pass for openly and obviously letting themselves get out of shape like Schilling did towards the end of his career?  How many ballplayers have been as openly opinionated as Schilling was during his playing days? Given everything we know about the culture of baseball clubhouses, I’m sure there are no small number of former teammates who didn’t much care for the different rules that applied to Schilling, just as Schilling didn’t care for Pedro’s special treatment.

Schilling says ” I know people are going to make it a bigger deal than I’m making it.”  Of course he does. Indeed, getting his opinion out there, stirring up stuff and having people talk about it is his entire reason for living anymore, is . Which is fine if that’s what he wants to do. But he should at least have a little self-awareness about it.

Pedro is an unorthodox, attention-creating personality. So was Schilling.  In light of that, I’m tempted to believe that Schilling’s biggest problem with Pedro was that his time in Boston represented the first time in his career he had some competition as the center of attention.

  1. Greg Rodich - Nov 6, 2009 at 10:32 AM

    Two biggest losers there are & they both have to shoot there mouth off when no one asked them too. Dick Cheney & Curt I’m a fraud Schilling. Just go away. Everyone knows you were a bandwagon jumper Arizona & the Red Sox. You are a rat fink that hides when your trash talking comes back too you. Tough talk behind people’s back, why don’t you say this stuff to there faces. You are a punk,

  2. sticksstones - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:16 AM

    I’ve had my differences with Schilling, but he is absolutely correct about this. I love Pedro, but he was quite the diva when he was with Boston. He definitely thought there should be different rules for him. Trash Schill all you want, but he always supported the team, and never left early on them during a game. Maybe if Pedro had the same work habits Schill did, he would have had more success in the later part of his career.

  3. adam - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:22 AM

    ugh, enough please, how ever irrelevant you were in the public eye when you were a player you are even less relevant now that you retired…please schiliing, shut up. i am a yankees fan but i like pedro, he makes a great enemy b/c you know that he respects the rivalry, schilling on the other hand is just a gas bag “Different Rules” what about the time you were sitting in the dugout covering your eyes as Mitch Williams was pitching for the Phillies in the WS, what kind of teammate were you!?! Someone needs to put him in his place.

  4. DRomo - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:23 AM

    “So was Schilling. In light of that, I’m tempted to believe that Schilling’s biggest problem with Pedro was that his time in Boston represented the first time in his career he had some competition as the center of attention.”
    I agree with most of what you have said but this part is way off. Schilling was traded to Boston from Arizona where he shared the spotlight with Randy Johnson. I do, however, agree with your larger point that Schilling is an attention whore.

  5. his dudeness - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:26 AM

    schilling needs to just go away already. him and his bloody tampon, i mean sock, should just die. he’s an irritating, whiney p*ssy. boston wasn’t the first place he had a conflict with another, arguably better, pitcher. it’s well known his oversized gut, i mean ego, clashed with randy johnson in arizona. he’s as much of a diva as brett favre. oh well, yanks got number 27. jeet, mo, pettite, and jorge all own a fist full of rings. how many do you have, curt?

  6. GAJ - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:30 AM

    I will say up front that I am a Yankees fan through and through. Donny Baseball is my all time favorite player and my dogs name is Jeter. With that said, Curt Schilling is the player I despise the most all time in baseball. He is a primadonna who actually thinks people are interested in his opinions just because he could throw a baseball. He is a loser in my book. Overrated with the Phillies, Arizona, and Boston. Can’t stand him. Pedro, on the other hand, is someone I really disliked while he was with Boston and the Mets, mainly because of the Don Zimmer thing. But this last series has made me see him in a different light. He was laughing and smiling after getting pulled in game two when the fans were giving him hell. He also looked like he was having fun and really enjoying where he was. I appreciate the fact that maybe he realizes how lucky he has been to be able do all of the things he has done, and also I think he may understand that baseball, after all, is just a game.

  7. John in Nashville - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:34 AM

    This is the moron that ate his words about Alex Rodriguez … once again, why does anyone listen to this overrated, career crybaby idiot?

  8. jonny5 - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:35 AM

    Who really cares what Curt Schlingding has to say about any active players anyway??? Seriously though??? He may be a shoe tapper in the bathroom stalls of airports IMO.

  9. Evan - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:38 AM

    Stick, this is a clear case of the “pot calling the kettle.”
    Craig’s point is that both of them are out for attention and that if Schilling is bashing him for “playing by different rules” he is being a hypocrite.
    It’s irrelevant as to who was more “loyal” to the team. The fact of the matter is that Pedro was on the Red Sox for longer, was a better pitcher in his prime and was a more likeable guy than Schilling.
    I think he’s jealous, that despite his accomplishments, Pedro is more accomplished both in playing baseball and playing the media.

  10. Mike Clarke - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:40 AM

    Curt Schilling? Who’s that?

  11. Talex - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:43 AM

    Well, lets see: Pedro Martinez is the greatest pitcher of his generation, is one of the most compelling players in the history of the game, and will go down as one of the all time greats in baseball. Curt Schilling on the other hand is one of the most overated baseball pitchers ever and one of the most jealous players that have ever played the game. Look at who Schilling rags on: Pedro Martinez, Alex Rodriguez, and all the great players who out shine Mr. Schilling. He wants to be the big dog in a house full of bigger dogs; but he isn’t all that important within the history of the game.
    Time for Mr. Out-of-shape, look-at-me!, look-at-me! to shutup and realize that he will always live in the shadow of Pedro Martinez.
    Ask any Red Sox fan who they would want in their prime in a Game 7–it won’t be Schilling! And he can’t sleep at night over that so he has to take Pedro down anyway he can. He’s just a jealous loser!

  12. John - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:46 AM

    Schilling always has way too much to say. Just like a whning jealous little girl. He should take that sock with the fake blood and stick it in his mouth.

  13. planktonDisciple - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:57 AM

    Pedro has the greatest career difference between his era and the league era. Better than Koufax. He was that much better than the league. Schilling had some great postseasons, but otherwise nowhere near as accomplished. I lost all respect for Schilling when he was questioned following a WS victory, and exploited the opportunity to put out a political opinion.

  14. Peete - Nov 6, 2009 at 11:59 AM

    There are 2 people in this world that I wanna punch right in their grills. One is dubya and the other one is curt schilling.

  15. Curt Schilling - Nov 6, 2009 at 12:10 PM

    shill: One who poses as a satisfied customer or an enthusiastic gambler to dupe bystanders into participating in a swindle.
    shilling: A coin used in the United Kingdom, worth one twentieth of a pound, 5 new pence
    Take your pick, either pretty much sums up Curt Schilling and his all-to-quick-to-give-his-moronic-opinion

  16. Phillies Fan - Nov 6, 2009 at 12:12 PM

    Curt Schilling was a horse every 5 days and a horse’s ass the other 4.

  17. Church of the Perpetually Outraged - Nov 6, 2009 at 12:46 PM

    Pedro has the greatest career difference between his era and the league era. Better than Koufax. He was that much better than the league. Schilling had some great postseasons, but otherwise nowhere near as accomplished. I lost all respect for Schilling when he was questioned following a WS victory, and exploited the opportunity to put out a political opinion.

    Technically Rivera does, but I know what you mean. (I believe Wagner comes in 2nd, but doesn’t have the IP to qualify).

  18. ding - Nov 6, 2009 at 12:58 PM

    Wow what a attention craving moron… Try first serve as assistant to a small city mayor before putting your name to replace Ted Kennedy. Just comical… So full of it that he can’t see shit on his belly

  19. The Common Man - Nov 6, 2009 at 1:04 PM

    I like the picture Craig used. Curt looks very coquettish.

  20. Steve Stein - Nov 6, 2009 at 1:50 PM

    I’m tempted to believe that Schilling’s biggest problem with Pedro was that his time in Boston represented the first time in his career he had some competition as the center of attention.
    Wait a sec. When he was with Arizona, wasn’t there this big lefty ace? Really tall? Strikeout artist? Name’s on the tip of my tongue… :-)

  21. Craig Calcaterra - Nov 6, 2009 at 2:08 PM

    I meant competition as a media figure/personality. Randy Johnson is notoriously taciturn to the point of surliness. Pedro, in contrast, was of interest to the media and got a lot of attention for his personality. My admittedly amateur theory is that Schilling likes to be the only one like that in the room at any given time.

  22. BillyBeaneismyHero - Nov 6, 2009 at 2:24 PM

    Schilling is supplanted only by Roger Clemens circa 1993-1996 in the athlete who most obviously got a pass for letting himself go category. He had just signed a huge contract, came into spring training with seven chins, thus beginning the twilight of his career. Then he discovered lidacane and B-12 shots, and had a random late career resurrence–twice.

  23. oswegosteve - Nov 6, 2009 at 2:25 PM

    Schilling loves the sound of his own voice, always has. Tell him to pour himself another drink and suck down another back of cheese doodles while he watches the rest of his former teammates continue to play…..

  24. kevin - Nov 6, 2009 at 2:48 PM

    maybe these “special rules” that apply to pedro allowed him to keep pitching to gain attention, instead of sitting on the sidelines, getting fat, and running his mouth like kurt. shut up you putz

  25. Evan - Nov 6, 2009 at 3:22 PM

    I still say they should test the bloody sock for performance enhancing drugs…

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