Skip to content

Breaking: McGwire admits to using steroids in 1998

Jan 11, 2010, 3:04 PM EDT

We knew this was coming eventually, but now it has finally come. McGwire was taking steroids in 1998 when he broke the home run record.  Excerpts from his statement, which have been leaked:

  • “I wish I had never touched steroids.  It
    was foolish and it was a mistake. I truly apologize. Looking back, I
    wish I had never played during the steroid era.”
  • “I never knew when, but I always knew this day would come.  It’s time for me to talk about the past and to confirm what
    people have suspected”
  • “I’m sure people will wonder if I could have hit all those home runs
    had I never taken steroids. I had good years when I
    didn’t take any, and I had bad years when I didn’t take any. I had good
    years when I took steroids, and I had bad years when I took steroids.
    But no matter what, I shouldn’t have done it and for that I’m truly
    sorry.”
  • “After all this time, I want to come clean. I was not in a
    position to do that five years ago in my congressional testimony, but
    now I feel an obligation to discuss this and to answer questions about
    it. I’ll do that, and then I just want to help my team.”
  • “I remember trying steroids very briefly in the 1989/1990 offseason and
    then after I was injured in 1993, I used steroids again. I used them on occasion throughout the ’90s,
    including during the 1998 season.”
  • “During the mid-’90s, I went on the DL seven times and missed 228 games
    over five years. I experienced a lot
    of injuries, including a ribcage strain, a torn left heel muscle, a
    stress fracture of the left heel, and a torn right heel muscle. It was
    definitely a miserable bunch of years, and I told myself that steroids
    could help me recover faster. I thought they would help me heal and
    prevent injuries, too.”
  • “Baseball is really different now — it’s been cleaned up. The commissioner and the players’ association implemented
    testing and they cracked down, and I’m glad they did.”

The AP report says that McGwire also used human growth hormone, though McGwire didn’t include that
detail in his statement.

  1. Ralph - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:14 PM

    I am outraged. Oh wait, no I’m not.

  2. Michael - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:15 PM

    I’m assuming this is humor at the expense of the random “BreakingNews” tweeter.
    Yet likely true nevertheless, so they can’t lose, right?…

  3. Michael - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:16 PM

    I’m assuming this is humor at the expense of the random “BreakingNews” tweeter.
    Yet likely true nevertheless, so they can’t lose, right?…

  4. Michael - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:18 PM

    A lesson for you, kids: do not take lightly that “data will be reposted” warning when you hit “back” on your browser. Sorry.

  5. Michael - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:24 PM

    D’oh.
    Well, now we see if the BBWAA members whose votes were supposedly contingent on him “being honest about it” make good…

  6. Josh - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:27 PM

    I’d like to propose that, should Mac now be ushered into the Hall of Fame (I mean, c’mon, he’s a shoo-in next year, now, right?), this will establish a precedent for those suspected of using steroids. Admit it, and you’re in. Zip it, and you can buy a ticket like everyone else.
    AND THAT MEANS that Barry Bonds had better be paying attention. He might never get in unless he also ‘fesses up. It’ll be interesting to see if Pete Rose, admitted sinner, will get new support for his candidacy, too. But mostly, I hope this forces Bonds to swallow hard and start talking.

  7. Simon DelMonte - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:33 PM

    Please, someone tell Congress that they have no obligation whatsoever to call him back.
    And if that doesn’t work, just say the letters BCS. That might keep them busy.
    In all seriousness, I can’t say I care much one way or the other in terms of McGwire or mortality. But I do find myself wondering if he could actually tell us the pattern of his use and compare it with his home run rates. I’ve never really been convinced about steroids and home runs, though certainly the circumstantial evidence suggests steroids help somewhat.
    I also wonder if steroids really helped his health. Would he have missed more games without them? Did side effects from steroids offset his gains? Was there a placebo effect? If we are going to ban steroids, we should have actual scientific data instead of supposition.

  8. Jamie - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:39 PM

    I will never understand why these guys feel the need to justify and hedge with “I was hurt a lot” and “I wasn’t always doing them”. Why not just say “I took steroids and they made me stronger. I’m sorry if that somehow ruins your enjoyment of something that happened twelve years ago.”

  9. YANKEES1996 - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:39 PM

    O.k. Congress do your thing! Roger Maris you may now rest. Barry are you paying attention, if your not you had better start! This is not the most earth shattering news that has ever been announced but I would like to know what triggered the truth. Check another known name off the list, now that leaves Palmeiro, and how many others 102 or 103 perhaps. Everytime one of these guys admits their mistakes the game heals a little more. I will give you credit Mark McGwire for telling the truth, good job! Now don’t you feel better?

  10. Alex Poterack - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:46 PM

    What if Bonds never did use steroids, though? Yes, I know that’s considered crazy talk these days, and I personally think it’s most likely that he did use them, but think about the shitty situation that would be. Do we really want to create a situation where, for some people, the only way to get respect is to confess to something they never did?

  11. Jacob - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:46 PM

    “Baseball is really different now — it’s been cleaned up. The commissioner and the players’ association implemented testing and they cracked down, and I’m glad they did.”
    I’m sure glad to know the commissioner cleaned up baseball. I like the game so much better now that none of the players are using performance enhancers. /sarcasm

  12. Mr Selig - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:52 PM

    Hey, we all did steroids back then. Even my dad “Big Ben” did them when he tweaked a hammy. Let’s all give Mark a pass on this one, and Sammy, Rodger and even Barry when they fess up. In a few years, when this all becomes history, we can re-introduce them legally as herbal supplements.
    Bud

  13. bill - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:52 PM

    Bonds doesn’t deny using steroids. He denies knowing at the time that he knew it was steroids.

  14. Cards Fan - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:55 PM

    Man that took you forever Mark. The memories you left far out weigh the damage you did to yourself. Thanks for coming clean.

  15. Norm - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:55 PM

    Who cares, this is baseball, a game, are there not more important issues to worry about? War, hunger, people being killed for there belief’s to name just a couple.

  16. Ric - Jan 11, 2010 at 3:58 PM

    MLB has no problem hyping Viagra, it’s performance enhancing. Let Big Mac get on with his life, leave the brother alone! Sports writers have always been prostitutes (most of them) What are you guys on? You’re right nobody cares. If it wasn’t for the marketing power of the media, baseball wouldn’t grease your palms. You guys shouldn’t have a vote for the Hall of Fame. The whole deal is a bad joke. Get a life.

  17. Randy - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:00 PM

    Until the union allows blood testing and/or storage of samples, baseball will not be “clean”. And what a bunch of hooey, Bonds knew exactly what he was taking. Everyone else at BALCO knew what they were taking. Why wouldn’t Big Head Barry?

  18. scatterbrian - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:05 PM

    Members who have not voted for McGwire basically fall into three camps: 1) those who think McGwire is undeserving because he was a one- or two- dimensional player, 2) those who will not vote for suspected or admitted steroid users, 3) those who will only vote for admitted steroid users who are contrite. McGwire just received 128 votes, 273 shy of induction. So, out of the 411 members who did not vote for McGwire, at least 273 need to be in Camp 3 in order for McGwire to have any chance. That number seems too big.

  19. Mer - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:08 PM

    Suprised? no…
    Does this change anything at all? no….
    So all it is, is a clear conscience…great…wonderful….
    Baseball was ruined during the “steriod era”.
    Those ONCE great records are now tarnished with steriod using cowards who don’t have to guts to come clean with their steriod use….
    Selig is also a coward for not REMOVING all records broken by these steriod using jackholes…….
    AND NO ASTERIKS!!!!!!!!! JUST REMOVE THEM!!!!!!!!!!!
    that is all

  20. scatterbrian - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:09 PM

    Yes, Norm, there are more important issues, and there are websites with public forums dedicated to those issues. However, you won’t find them very often on a website dedicated to sports coverage.

  21. scatterbrian - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:11 PM

    Members who have not voted for McGwire basically fall into three camps: 1) those who think McGwire is undeserving because he was a one- or two- dimensional player, 2) those who will not vote for suspected or admitted steroid users, 3) those who will only vote for admitted steroid users who are contrite. McGwire just received 128 votes, 273 shy of induction. So, out of the 411 members who did not vote for McGwire, at least 273 need to be in Camp 3 in order for McGwire to have any chance. That number seems too big.

  22. Peter S. - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:19 PM

    Who cares what ballplayer took steroids,it’s lying about it that is the problem. The damage to the kids is already done once those who the kids look up to and try to be like, lie about there conduct. The only way to show the kids that lying and cheating is wrong, is for those who engage in it are punished, and do not receive any rewards or medals for their accomplishments or achievments either in sports or any endeavor that they pursue in life. This applies to all sports and those in public life, who have the greatest effect on our young people.

  23. YANKEES1996 - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:21 PM

    Alex, Nobody is asking these players to admit to something they did not do, but these players are tied up in this scandal for good reason. When you deal with the less than honest trainers and strength coaches and other people they are going to use your famous name to get themselves out of trouble when they get in trouble, that is the way these games are played. Bonds, McGwire, Rodriguez, Ortiz, Clemens, Giambi and all the others know the world works this way, what is suprising is that they take the chance anyway.
    Victor Conte named names in an effort to try to lessen his damage, when the players got tangled up in his admissions what they should have done is address the scandal right then, not try to dodge the story for years. As McGwire found out dodging the truth wears you down, makes you look bad and serves no purpose. We are all human, we have all made mistakes and done things we were not proud of, being an adult is standing up, admitting you did wrong and taking responsibility for your actions.

  24. The Bottom Line - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:29 PM

    They need to check and see if he lied to congress, and if so he needs to get the same treatment that they are giving barry bonds.

  25. wowlfie - Jan 11, 2010 at 4:31 PM

    Anyone with a pair of eyes could see he was on steroids. Just look at the size of his forearms. Those are NOT natural.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Giants, Royals took unique paths to WS
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. T. Ishikawa (2506)
  2. M. Bumgarner (2449)
  3. J. Shields (2054)
  4. Y. Molina (1925)
  5. L. Cain (1808)
  1. T. Lincecum (1766)
  2. B. Posey (1589)
  3. A. Wainwright (1509)
  4. Y. Cespedes (1417)
  5. R. Martin (1408)