Skip to content

When it comes to steroids, put Robin Yount in the "reasonable" camp

Jan 25, 2010, 5:30 PM EDT

Missed this from late last week, but Robin Yount has become the latest in a long line of Hall of Famers to weigh in on the Mark McGwire steroids stuff. When asked what he thought of Carlton Fisk and Rich Gossage and everyone taking shots at McGwire, he had this to say:

“A number of guys have that attitude. I would like to know what they would’ve done if they
were in that same boat. I’ll be very honest, in the fact that there was no
testing and if there were benefits from it, it would have been very
difficult. Without testing in place, you would’ve almost been forced to do it to keep up . . . It wouldn’t have been an easy decision. Or maybe it would’ve been
an easy decision, for that matter. You just would’ve had to do it to
keep up. I’m
glad that I didn’t have to make that call because it would have been a
very difficult decision to decide whether to do it or not.”

When it comes to a person’s acts, there is such a thing as right and wrong.  But when it comes to a person’s motivations, there is very rarely such a clear dichotomy. The people who have come out strong against McGwire and his brethren in the steroid brotherhood are completely right to go after the acts, but they’re either completely misguided when it comes to the motivations or else they don’t see the difference.

  1. ochocinco - Jan 25, 2010 at 5:38 PM

    Word!

  2. Alex Poterack - Jan 25, 2010 at 6:16 PM

    As a Brewers fan, I’m required to like Robin Yount. I’m glad to see he’s a reasonable enough guy to be worthy of it.

  3. mgflolox - Jan 25, 2010 at 7:56 PM

    Robin Yount – Pure class all the way. He’s always been one of my favorites.

  4. CharlieH - Jan 25, 2010 at 8:30 PM

    So what were their motivations. Do you believe in fairy tales, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, “Otherworldly Athletes”. Maybe they took them for humanitarian reasons.

  5. bobby - Jan 25, 2010 at 8:33 PM

    Well, the guy has always been a class act. No wonder george brett named one of his sons after him.

  6. Craig Calcaterra - Jan 25, 2010 at 9:00 PM

    Some guys out of fear that they’d lose their roster spots. Some guys because they’re ego cases who wanted to hit the ball 600 feet every time. Some because they’ve been conditioned since they were kids that there is no ethical problem with doing whatever it takes to win. Some because they felt that the difference between doing it and not doing it was the difference between having to sell real estate when they were 50 and the next five generations of their families set up for life.
    The point isn’t that their reasons excuse their behavior — they really don’t — the point is that there are likely as many motivations as there are players who did it.
    Of course, if you believe most of the media people, they all did it because they’re dirty lying cheaters who like cheat and lie and cheat, and the only time they could be found without a syringe in their hand is when they were twirling their evil cheating mustaches and going “Bwahahahahah!!!”

  7. Robin - Jan 26, 2010 at 1:49 AM

    Thanks, guys.

  8. cheaters justice - Jan 26, 2010 at 2:06 AM

    All these including the greenie user have got to realize that alot of what they were doing was CRIMINAL behavior in the name of sport.
    Amphetamines became prescription only in 1965 and a controlled substance by 1970. Steroids became a controlled substance in 1990. So unless the doctors were prescribing it these guys were committing CRIMINAL acts. If you read any of the laws you see words and phrases it’s illegal to possess,distribute,sell,dispense or furnish. If they were injecting their buddies in the butt they were ILLEGALLY dispensing a controlled substance. If they had possession of an unprescriped vial of steroids they were in CRIMINAL possession. If they sold their buddies crap even if at a discount or ” only to friend “(that’s my favorite lame drug dealer excuse-they only sell to friends) they were drug dealing. True most of the offenses probably would’ve been misdemeanors or bargined down to a misdemeanor UNLESS there were some serious or regular sales in which case they were illegal criminal drug dealers.
    Forget about there was no testing in baseball and just remember that many of these guys participated in ILLEGAL CRIMINAL drug deals or were in CRIMINAL possession of PEDs. Crime in the name of sport.

  9. Chris W - Jan 26, 2010 at 3:24 AM

    What’s your point?

  10. Moses Green - Jan 26, 2010 at 6:35 AM

    I was an elite athlete in high school and a group of friends and I worked out at a small gym in eastern Connecticut that had Bill Romanowski’s picture on the wall (Boston College uni at that time). There were a dozen juiceheads who were always there. Fortunately for me, my friends and I decided to lift clean – but the other option was always there, with their perms and frizz mullets and shrunken balls. Lord they loved their mirrors.
    If my teammates (guys I’d known since kindergarten) had all decided to cycle with the beach muscle crowd, I probably would have done the same thing. Furthermore, my career was cut short by injuries, and had HGH and more modern training methods had been available the Olympic level wasn’t out of the question for me.
    The thing that puts it over the top for me is that the guys who are on the margin know who they are, and they know everyone else who’s on that cliff’s edge with them. If you suddenly see one of your cliffside brethren bulk up and start slugging .500 out of the blue, any reasonably competitive person will at least consider doing whatever that guy was doing to make it away from the cliff.

  11. Morgan W - Jan 26, 2010 at 6:52 AM

    Everyone has their take on athlete’s and PED’s. Unless you’re in their shoes it’s difficult to have a worthy standpoint on the matter. However, what seems to be the underlying issue is that the individuals who have been implicated later on, have plead innocence at some point. Mr McGwire please do not insult our collective intelligence when you abruptly deny any such allogations for nearly a decade. I dont care who uses what and when. Just admit to lying when asked and appologise for it. No one seems to grasp the real issue here.

  12. Joey B - Jan 26, 2010 at 8:49 AM

    “Some guys out of fear that they’d lose their roster spots. Some guys because they’re ego cases who wanted to hit the ball 600 feet every time. Some because they’ve been conditioned since they were kids that there is no ethical problem with doing whatever it takes to win. Some because they felt that the difference between doing it and not doing it was the difference between having to sell real estate when they were 50 and the next five generations of their families set up for life.”
    That’s basically the same defense that all the Wall Street execs have used over the years. The guys making $100k don’t want to lose out to the guys making $200k. Some players want the killer deals, so they’ll fix the system in their favor and park securities overseas. Some have been conditioned since their days at Harvard to win at all costs. Some secretaries and printers will sell it just to make that down payment.
    And after all, it isn’t really wrong if everyone is doing it. Moody’s has to rate the toxic waste as AAA if the guy down the block would do the same. And after all, the commissioner (SEC) didn’t really crack down.
    If there is one constant in this world, it is that people doing wrong always have a motivation. They’ll do something that they know is wrong, and they’ll rationalize it as best as possible. You’ll add 20% to your charitable deductions because other people do it. You’ll cheat on tests in HS because someone else does and you can’t let them get that edge.
    This is not to say I wouldn’t have done PEDs: I probably would’ve. I’ve done plenty of things wrong. But at this point, I don’t equivocate and rationalize and try to exlain away my guilt.

  13. Chris W - Jan 26, 2010 at 9:06 AM

    Your Wall Street analogy is right on. Because no one’s arguing that steroid culture excuses steroid use. But it explains it.
    When you look back at the culture of greed on Wall Street do you wag your fingers at the traders? Maybe a little. But we all know that they weren’t these insidious kingpins of greed masterminding the decay of banking as their own ingenious plan to get themselves and only themselves rich.
    If they broke the law they broke the law. If they were inethical they were inethical. No mitigating culture of “anything” can change that. But all anyone’s saying about steroids is that although McGwire and Ivan Rodriguez and Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens and so on and so on were wrong to use steroids, it’s certainly understandable why they did it.

  14. Joey B - Jan 26, 2010 at 9:29 AM

    “But all anyone’s saying about steroids is that although McGwire and Ivan Rodriguez and Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens and so on and so on were wrong to use steroids, it’s certainly understandable why they did it.”
    Yeah, I understand the motivation. And it is not unequivocle. Some kids in college would get the pro forma of last year’s test since similar questions would be asked. Some said it was nothing more than a study guide, while others said they shouldn’t have to play on an uneven playing field. And like I said, I probably would’ve taken them, and then rationalized that I needed to go from AAAA to the pros, or from a bench player to a starter, or that I sprained my ankle, or that everyone else was taking them. But it is all just a rationalization for cheating.
    And even that wouldn’t raise my ire. It’s the writers and posters saying there is no evidence that it helped. Guys put outlawed substances in their body, quite possibly quite harmful substances, and they are doing it for what? For kicks?
    In 71 years, one player hits 60 HRs, and then in a space of 4 years, it is done 6 times? Just admit the PEDs supplied a huge advantage, that they cheated for personal gain, whether it was money or glory, and get on with it.

  15. Delma Straathof - Feb 4, 2010 at 6:36 PM

    It can cut down your offline commercializing tolls too if you get it ended decent. Acquiring someone who not only does SEO but does the content creation and distribution for you as well as keyword search, updating content on your site and blog, having professionaly scripted press releases at reduced prices as observed previous is what suits many small business proprietors and yet there are some who try out to do it themselves, they get lost as they dont have the knowledge or the technical skills to do it speedily and they give up. Thank you for this article! I’ve just recovered a certainly big site about seo Attempt it!

  16. Nenita Kossakowski - Mar 6, 2010 at 1:26 AM

    Thank you for the information, your website is lovely! My family and I try to have brunch for Easter and have a wonderful time. This totally made me smile!

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

The Jon Lester-Yoenis Cespedes trade is a win-win
Top 10 MLB Player Searches