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Video: Steve Phillips on 'The Today Show'

Feb 8, 2010, 2:48 PM EST

Craig already wrote about Steve Phillips’ apologetic appearance on The Today Show, but here’s the actual video of his interview with Matt Lauer:

  1. BC - Feb 8, 2010 at 2:59 PM

    I wonder if Tiger TiVo’d this.

  2. Steve - Feb 8, 2010 at 3:38 PM

    Lauer lied in the first ten seconds. He called Phillips “popular.”

  3. Old Gator - Feb 8, 2010 at 4:03 PM

    If I had even one brown paper bag that was wax-lined, I might watch this. Otherwise, just it’s too far from the TV to the porcelain goddess. That, and I haven’t eaten any of the wrong mushrooms today, so I have no pressing ancillary reasons to want to barf. I guess this is one puelling, pathetic, self-serving celebrity exercise I’ll have to do without. Woe is me.

  4. Moses Green - Feb 8, 2010 at 4:21 PM

    Ditto, except I ate the mushrooms.
    Time for your Borges story. I’m reading the complete collected stories translated by a guy named Andrew Hurley, and I’ve been through the rhombus and your dusty garden with the useless cry of the bird. Whenever I make a discovery like this (which granted, isn’t every day) I smack myself in the head, a V-8 moment, how on earth could I have gone through as many literature courses as I have without him getting even a wink aside from Douglas Adams and now Old Gator? And furthermore and perhaps more importantly, what the fuck is wrong with me that I had to hear it from you? Douglas Adams wasn’t authority enough for me? I own Last Chance to See and I couldn’t take his word on it? Guh.

  5. David Salsburg - Feb 8, 2010 at 6:25 PM

    At around 5:50 in he describes “addicts” like him as being borken people with “a hole to fill.” Not the words I would use in his situation…

  6. Old Gator - Feb 8, 2010 at 11:00 PM

    To be honest, I don’t know how you could have possibly made it this far without some professor, any professor, forcing you to read at least “Pierre Menard,” “The Library of Babel,” “Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius”….well, we could go on in this vein all night, you know? I mean, the guy is (a) the father of magic realism; (b) a decisive influence on Pynchon, Calvino, DeLillo, Aksyonov, Umberto Eco (the blind librarian in the monastery in The Name of the Rose was Jorge of Burgos, remeber?), Milorad Pavic, William Gibson…dear Buddha, he may have even influenced Lawrence Sterne to write Tristram Shandy a hundred years before he was goddamned born, is how influential he was. And funny too.
    .
    The story. Okay, you know about the world famous Masters in Fine Arts writing workshop at the University of Iowa in Iowa City? I’m pretty sure it was Christopher Merrill, a very good American poet, who told me this story at a weeklong poetry retreat in Taos, New Mexico led by Galway Kinnell back in, oh, 1988 or so. Well, Borges came up from Buenos Aires a couple of times to speak there. Yeah, they pull all sorts of heavies there – Wallace Stegner, you name it. Anyway, Borges was practically blind – macular degeneration – and his eyesight had been failing for years. It was the second time that he had been at UI, and Christopher Merrill and a few others drove out to Quad Cities Airport to pick him up. On the way back, they got caught in a snowstorm and the winds were so high that they couldn’t see anything but white beyond the windows. They were crawling along, Borges sitting impassively in the back seat with his hands folded over his cane. After about an hour of this, Borges commented, “You know, it’s been twenty years since I was last here and it still looks exactly the same.”
    .
    Poor Iowa.

  7. Black Finnegan - Feb 9, 2010 at 9:25 AM

    That was certainly worth the wait. Henka.

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