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Someone actually cares about MLB's gun policy

Feb 21, 2010, 10:11 AM EDT

When Major League Baseball decided Saturday to officially outlaw guns in clubhouses we figured the story would draw a few laughs and maybe some snarky remarks.  What we didn’t expect, however, was serious, disappointed reaction from a current professional.

According to the always reliable St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Cardinals closer Ryan Franklin didn’t take too kindly to the rule change:
“If you grew up around it, being in the outdoors and stuff, I was taught as a young kid to respect firearms,” Franklin said after a Saturday workout. “First of all, you don’t get stupid with it.  Always treat a gun like it’s loaded.  That’s what I taught my son and daugthers.  There’s a place for them. … If it wasn’t for the NFL guy a couple years ago brining a weapon to a nightclub … you’ve just got to be smart.
To us, “smart” is ensuring that no firearm ever finds its way into an MLB workplace, period.  And that’s exactly why the new policy was put into effect.
  1. Brett - Feb 21, 2010 at 10:22 AM

    Haha. I think the recent quick draw competition in the NBA locker room was more of a factor in this than “the NFL guy a couple years ago bringing a weapon to a nightclub”.
    Franklin is a moron.

  2. NRA - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:05 AM

    This is not right. Guns should be allowed in baby cribs.

  3. Baseball fan - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:07 AM

    It’s becauuse of the small minds of guys like this that guns are a problem in the first place. How many guns do his sons and duaghters have?

  4. Jim - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:10 AM

    “To us, “smart” is ensuring that no firearm ever finds its way into an MLB workplace, period. And that’s exactly why the new policy was put into effect.”
    Really? As if some MLB “policy” is going to keep a criminal from bringing a gun into the MLB workplace. The only thing the “policy” does is keep law-abiding folks defenseless. What do you tell your daughter when she’s being dragged into an alley to be raped? Blow your whistle? Use your cell phone? You sound like a fool.

  5. Randy - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:16 AM

    Why would anyone need or want a gun in a club house . Just one more over paid idiot in sports that needs to get a life !

  6. diehardcubforever - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:17 AM

    Well, he plays for the Cardinals, strike one
    Acts like a hick from Missouri, strike two
    and yes, being smart is not even bringing a gun to someplace like a MLB ballpark…the fact that he doesn’t even get that is proof he is an idiot….strike three looking!!!

  7. Jeff - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:25 AM

    Seriously? Who’s the criminal coming into the clubhouse? One of the trainers is disgruntled with his Christmas tip? While I’d call some of the players criminals for their production compared to their salary, it’s not the same thing!
    They are free to carry an anti-aircraft gun for all I care on their own time. Just not in the locker room. I don’t think theirs a huge danger of player-hypothetical rape in the clubhouse but it’s nice to know you’re looking out just in case!

  8. David C - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:26 AM

    If two students had guns at Virginia Tech instead of just one maybe 30+ people wouldn’t have died like sheep. I know this sounds harsh but absence of firearms does not make a place safe.

  9. Sean - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:26 AM

    “Small minds of guys like this are a reason that guns are a problem in the first place.” Lemme guess, you guys must have voted for NObama?
    You really see a bunch of major leaguers constantly in trouble with the law, pulling guns on each other, shooting up nightclubs, or even having an unlicensed weapon don’t you? Who’s got the small mind? It’s retards like you that probably are in favor of gun control, but don’t realize that criminals that are going to use a gun to commit a crime will do so whether there is a law or not. Don’t like guns? Then move to France, jackass!

  10. Randall - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:29 AM

    I agree completely that education re: firearms is very important. But someone should point out to the pinhead that nobody can get shot if there’s no guns around.

  11. JC - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:32 AM

    Jim, Jim, Jim,
    Stop with the knee-jerk hysteria and think before you just rattle off NRA BS.

  12. FormerMarineSargent - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:32 AM

    Jim posted:
    “To us, “smart” is ensuring that no firearm ever finds its way into an MLB workplace, period. And that’s exactly why the new policy was put into effect.”
    Really? As if some MLB “policy” is going to keep a criminal from bringing a gun into the MLB workplace. The only thing the “policy” does is keep law-abiding folks defenseless. What do you tell your daughter when she’s being dragged into an alley to be raped? Blow your whistle? Use your cell phone? You sound like a fool.
    ————————————————————–
    And yours is the blind allegiance to an idea that has a place – but can’t stand that not EVERYWHERE is the place for these.
    First of all, the ‘what keeps a criminal from bringing a gun into …..’ arguement is a lame and ineffective red herring. It’s a false arguement. Here’s the reason: We don’t have a problem with criminals bringing guns into that workplace today. We won’t have a problem with criminals doing it tomorrow either.
    And your inflamitory arguement about ‘defenseless law-abiding citizens’ and ‘not being able to stop daughters being dragged into alleys to be raped’ are just as poor and just as red herring as well. 1) I don’t carry a gun (often) – I’m not defenseless when I’m not carrying. Neither are you. AND Just because I’m not carrying doesn’t mean I’m any more likely to be come in trouble (The true likelyhood is so small it’s nearly zero unlike what you gun nuts try to make us think) 2) The chances of your daughter is attacked is near zero. Add to that if the attacker is busy with your daughter, he’s not going to be able to do anything to stop you from kicking his @@@ whether you have a gun or not.
    Most gun rights arguements like this are nothing more than phallic or testosterone symbols to make up for what’s missing in your life.
    I own guns and carry when I think it’s appropriate. I happen to think that there are times when it’s not appropriate and that my gun rights DO NOT override other people’s right to not be confronted by guns in places where they aren’t appropriate.

  13. Jim From Wisconsin - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:38 AM

    I find it funny that this is an issue. Most workplaces won’t allow firearms in the workplace – if I took one to my computer programming office there’d be an issue. I’m a die hard cardinals fan myself but this is dumb. I can totally understand him maybe wanting one in his car in case he gets jumped or something – but in the clubhouse? That’s dumb.

  14. Randy - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:40 AM

    Good call DIEHARD. Any one found to have a gun in a club house in any sport should be banned for life. To many people in sports have guns for one reason and it’s not the right reason !

  15. Frank - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:42 AM

    I really don’t think bringing a firearm into a baseball clubhouse is such a bad thing. If the person with the gun has a permit for it. However there are some people who don’t have a permit and carry firearms anyway. This just show how stupid they. My belief is that if you have a permit you should be allowed to take a gun anywhere you please. It is our constitutional right. Certain people,they know who they are need to mind their own business.

  16. sjp - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:43 AM

    Many MLB players are hunters. I doubt they bring hand guns or ammunition to the stadium; however, it was probably not uncommon for them to bring rifles to the stadium either to show each other a new weapon or because they were coming from a firing range.
    As with most cases (i.e. most laws), the problem with fire arm laws is that they generally are knee-jerk reactions by politicians or hysterics and are created by people that have no understanding of firearms themselves and without consultation with those that have an understanding of the larger effect of such laws. The lack of efficacy of such laws is evident.
    These idiocies are akin to allowing people with no experience in education and no expertise in a particular field of study decide what should be taught in our schools….thankfully, that doesn’t happen.

  17. Jim - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:45 AM

    It happened to my daughter, JC. In broad daylight at 8:30 am in an upscale Chicago neighborhood.
    No one knows when violence will erupt. Just look at the college professor who blew away her colleagues just a week or two ago. If one of them had been carrying a weapon for defense, the tragedy could have been minimized. Is that so different that an MLB locker room? There’s nothing “knee-jerk” or “hysterical” about my position, JC. I’ve given it careful consideration. And I conclude that if somebody threatens my life with a gun, I sure want to be able to adequately defend myself.

  18. Sean K. - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:48 AM

    No one thought there would ever be a problem with guns brought to the stadium by the players until the NBA incident with Gilbert Arenas and Jarvis Crittendon a few months ago, and Arenas was not one of those “thug life” players. But he still did it. One wouldn’t expect the same thing to happen in the MLB, but you DO have to consider the fact that a lot of MLB players have proclivities towards both booze and steroids (the ones that haven’t been put on the banned substances list), and I want neither a drunk nor a roid rager having access to guns outside of their home.
    When the framers of the Constitution and Bill of Rights gave you the right to bear arms, their idea of “arms” could fire ons shot before taking a minute or two to reload. And it was to protect themselves from the British unlawfully invading their homes, and from the (rightfully angry) Native Americans in the wilderness. They could not have forseen the modern guns or gun problems of today. Times have evolved, and so have weapons. It’s only natural that the laws that govern them should evolve as well.
    Calling others who don’t agree with you “retards” only goes to show your own level of retardation. If you’re for guns in the home, you’re likely a hunter. And, as with most hunters, you probably take 10-15 gallons of beer with you on your hunting trips (don’t deny it, it’s people like you that Budweiser makes the “hunter’s case” of beer for). All you need is one bad trip and a nagging wife and before you know it you’ve got some shady lawyer trying to get you off on an insanity plea. Therefore but the grace of God go I, my man.
    Personally, I lost my best friend growing up to a gun in the home accident, as his uncle didn’t properly secure a loaded rifle in his home. I’m sure it was an honest mistake, but one that changed lives forever. For all your bluster about your precious guns, it only takes one mistake for your life to be in ruins.

  19. Jim - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:50 AM

    “We don’t have a problem with criminals bringing guns into that workplace today. We won’t have a problem with criminals doing it tomorrow either.”
    How do you reconcile your statement above with the college professor who killed her colleagues in a staff meeting just recently?

  20. Jim - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:52 AM

    “We don’t have a problem with criminals bringing guns into that workplace today. We won’t have a problem with criminals doing it tomorrow either.”
    How do you reconcile your statement above with the college professor who killed her colleagues in a staff meeting just recently?

  21. Ronod - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:56 AM

    The quotes by the baseball player say nothing about brining a gun into the locker room. Looks like the writer put words into the player’s mouth to further the writer’s position and create discussion – unless there was more that was not quoted. As a published writer, this kind of journalism would have gotten me a poor grade from my professors and editors.

  22. I Am Providence - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:57 AM

    Your constitutional right stops at my front door, and at the door of any private property or private business. If a business decides it doesn’t want it’s employees to bring guns to work, it can legally do so, just like I can legally stop you from bringing a gun into my house. Think about it, freedom of speech is guaranteed by the Constitution, but you still can’t stand up in the middle of your workplace and yell obscenities and insult your boss.

  23. Scott - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:57 AM

    I think everyone knows who’s got the small mind Sean, or should you go by “jackass”. Shouldn’t you be ironing your Palin 2012 wife beater or something. What a moron!

  24. canman - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:57 AM

    hey retard, all guns should be forbidden, period. 40,000 deaths by guns in your country, every single damn year, because of idiots like you who support guns. Gun deaths are almost non existent in countries where guns are forbidden. Get a clue.

  25. Sean - Feb 21, 2010 at 11:59 AM

    First off, I am sorry for the tragedy that befell your daughter, no one should have to suffer through the experience or the mental and emotional aftermath that follows.
    That said, you are absolutely insane if you think the way to prevent shootings like at the University of Alabama is to bring MORE guns into the school. Another teacher with a weapon is just as likely to get shot or to shoot the wrong person as he/she is to prevent the tragedy. There are certain places guns ABSOLUTELY DO NOT belong, including schools, churches, and the workplace. And for that idiotic Cardinals player, that’s his workplace and he is a fool to think bringing a gun, loaded or not, is a smart idea.
    Lastly, as your argument for carrying guns is a personal one, I’d be more afraid of people like you carrying them as it sounds like you want it more for retribution than protection. There is a very, very thin line between the two.
    I’ll again say, there’s no way the authors of the B.O.R. could have forseen the poqer, quickness, or widespread availability of guns in today’s society. If they could have, they likely would have added many stipulations to the right to bear arms.

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