Skip to content

Bud's committee considered radical realignment

Mar 10, 2010, 12:15 PM EDT

Ken Rosenthal took a stab at a radical realignment scheme a few weeks ago, and most people who think about the game have come up with their own plan from time to time, but this story from Tom Verducci is the first I’ve heard of someone with even quasi-authority mulling it over. The quasi-authority is Bud’s “special committee for on-field matters,” which reportedly discussed a radical form of “floating” realignment in which teams would not be
fixed to a division, but free to change divisions from year-to-year
based on “geography, payroll and their plans to contend or not.”  One possible example:

One example of floating realignment, according to one insider, would
work this way: Cleveland, which is rebuilding with a reduced payroll,
could opt to leave the AL Central to play in the AL East. The Indians
would benefit from an unbalanced schedule that would give them a total
of 18 lucrative home dates against the Yankees and Red Sox instead of
their current eight. A small or mid-market contender, such as Tampa Bay
or Baltimore, could move to the AL Central to get a better crack at
postseason play instead of continually fighting against the
mega-payrolls of New York and Boston.

Worth noting that this was just the stuff of brainstorming and no one is seriously considering it. That said, it’s pretty damn bad brainstorming. It’s bad enough when a team gives up on the season as it is. Formalizing a capitulation in such a matter would all but ensure that attendance went through the floor and that fans look to spend their summer entertainment dollar elsewhere.

Indeed, the first time a team decided to move to the AL East because they didn’t plan to compete, only to have the team get a little frisky and fall a few games short of the playoffs — which they would have likely made if they had stayed back home in their division — people would riot.

  1. Old Gator - Mar 10, 2010 at 12:29 PM

    Indeed, the first time a team decided to move to the AL East because they didn’t plan to compete, only to have the team get a little frisky and fall a few games short of the playoffs — which they would have likely made if they had stayed back home in their division — people would riot.
    Where? In Macondo? Are you kidding? The cops could show up wearing paper party hats for riot gear with perfect equanimity.

  2. Jonny5 - Mar 10, 2010 at 12:46 PM

    I hate that idea more than I hate stepping in a huge pile of fresh steaming dog crap. With bare feet. When it squishes between your toes.

  3. dchase - Mar 10, 2010 at 12:48 PM

    Who says the AL East would be a competitive division? The first thing that would happen is the Yankees, Red Sox and Rays would all make sure none of the three were in the same division.
    How about the 4 best teams in each league make the playoffs? Why should any team from the Al central make it in when they win nearly 10 fewer games than the Rays?? Dump or tweak the ‘unbalanced schedule’ and let the best teams into the playoffs.

  4. KR - Mar 10, 2010 at 12:52 PM

    I’m all for crazy realignment plans, and I’m glad they’re coming up with ideas, but that one makes no sense.

  5. Jonny5 - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:02 PM

    While your running. And slip and fall in it.

  6. YankeesfanLen - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:05 PM

    WOW! What a concept! Universe in AL Central! The economy has tamked already without $200M going down the drain on half as many games between You-know-who.
    I absolutely HATE the idea from historical purposes. 20 years from now, what do you say from memory? “Yanks won 105 games in ’13, forget which division they were in, but think they beat Wallyworld at Kaufman all 9 times”?

  7. Jamie - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:26 PM

    Um, wouldn’t *every* team request to be the AL East, so as to procure those 18 lucrative home dates against the Yankees and Red Sox? Or did baseball owners start valuing wins over profits when I wasn’t paying attention?

  8. RobRob - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:36 PM

    You have to love an idea that focuses all of its attention on “solving” the problem of two teams while leaving the rest of the 28 teams (including the entire National League in the lurch.

    Among other problems, there’s the limitation that teams can’t be in a time zone more than two away from its home city. Besides being completely ignorant of the fact that four of the six divisions actually, you know, span multiple time zones, it would prevent those pesky Red Sox and Yankees from ever interfering with those wild and crazy teams on the West Coast.

    If this is the kind of radical idea that this committee is considering, or more likely as an idea that will be leaked to prove the committee is really considering any and all ideas, no matter how stupid, I recommend that they disband said committee before it has even the sliver of a chance at destroying this game we all love.

  9. Old Gator - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:44 PM

    Wouldn’t you prefer a steaming heap of hot buttered groat clusters?

  10. Charles Gates - Mar 10, 2010 at 1:58 PM

    White Hat: 18 lucrative home dates against the Yankees and Red Sox .
    Red Hat: I hate that idea more than I hate stepping in a huge pile of fresh steaming dog crap. With bare feet. When it squishes between your toes. While your running. And slip and fall in it.
    Black Hat: did baseball owners start valuing wins over profits when I wasn’t paying attention?
    Yellow Hat: A small or mid-market contender, such as Tampa Bay or Baltimore, could move to the AL Central to get a better crack at postseason play instead of continually fighting against the mega-payrolls of New York and Boston.
    Green Hat: radical form of “floating” realignment in which teams would not be fixed to a division.
    Blue Hat: I absolutely HATE the idea from historical purposes. 20 years from now, what do you say from memory?

    Ok, thanks team. Done brain storming.

  11. Dan in Katonah - Mar 10, 2010 at 2:21 PM

    It would be fun to watch the teams jockeying from division to division as the deadline to decide approached. Wait, what? The Red Sox are moving to the Central, then let’s move to the West. No way, I was here first! Nuh-uh. Shotgun rules? It is like a moronic game of musical chairs. And would the changes remain in effect for more than a year?
    This idea is so stupid that I can only imagine that:
    a) it was conceived by Omar Minaya,
    b) they are going to do it, or
    c) the real intent was to build up some interest in baseball during a Spring Training that does not have the same drama as last year’s A-Rod/steroids hoopla.
    So, really, we should just blame all this on A-Rod and Omar. I can live with that.

  12. scatterbrian - Mar 10, 2010 at 2:40 PM

    It would be nice to see the Rays in the AL Central so they might finally get a crack at the World Series. It’s been forever since they were last there…

  13. Jonny5 - Mar 10, 2010 at 2:50 PM

    Well that depends. Are you talking about the global resolution open architecture transform? Or breakfast?

  14. YankeesfanLen - Mar 10, 2010 at 2:56 PM

    Just re-read the post and LOVE the part about changing division because of “geography, payroll, and their plans to contend or not.
    Let’s take this item by item with a random team selected by me:
    Geography: Moved across the street last year, next plan to move back in 85 years,
    Payroll: Take another team, multiply by 1.5 or 2, pay luxury tax, if not enough repeat.
    Plans to contend: ROFLMAO!!!!!!!
    My little code below contains my feelings for the plan: absolve figures

  15. Omega in Colorado - Mar 10, 2010 at 6:24 PM

    is it just me or does good old Bud get dumber by the day?
    I just have no earthly idea how to respond to this ‘floating realignment’. I think they should have left the idea ‘floating’ where they found it, or at least had the decenecy for a courtesy flush.

  16. Old Gator - Mar 10, 2010 at 8:49 PM

    It’s just you. Good old Bud gets dumber by the minute.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Who are the favorites for Rookie of the Year?
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. J. Soler (3238)
  2. R. Castillo (2751)
  3. Y. Molina (2580)
  4. A. Rizzo (2426)
  5. A. Dunn (2355)
  1. M. Cabrera (2303)
  2. B. Posey (2264)
  3. J. Ellsbury (2184)
  4. D. Pedroia (2102)
  5. M. Wacha (2014)