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News flash: Mike Lupica takes cheapshots at A-Rod

Mar 15, 2010, 8:30 AM EDT

Mike Lupica’s latest column about A-Rod and the Dr. Galea investigation stands as proof that he’s never been involved in a federal investigation:

Come on, there are more things fishy about all this than the old Fulton Fish Market. If the whole thing is so easily explained, if Rodriguez is “at ease” with the whole situation as he told the media in Florida the other day, how come he hasn’t cleared some of this up already, no matter how lawyered up he is.

Sometimes people bring lawyers with them when they talk to the feds
because they want to make sure they don’t incriminate themselves. But
if that’s the case with A-Rod, you’re probably thinking:

Incriminate himself about what?

I’m not the most suspicious person in the world. I still trust my government. I pay my taxes. I don’t think I’m under surveillance. I haven’t joined any militias this week or anything. But I can tell you one thing: if federal agents asked me to come in and talk to them, especially about a drug case, I’d have a lawyer with me no matter how tenuous and benign my connection to the matter.

Maybe the agents on the Galea case are nice young men, but federal drug prosecutions have been known to go off the rails in search of secondary ant tertiary targets pretty quickly. Can’t get the main guy? Get one of his lieutenants. Can’t get a lieutenant? Go after a major user. Can’t make a case against a user? Well, at least we can sift through the records and build a tax case against someone based on what we learned in interviews. No tax case? Well, perhaps we can just throw together false statement case against one of the many witnesses.  Yeah, let’s make it against the high profile dude so it doesn’t look like we’re picking on average citizens.

Against that backdrop — a backdrop that Lupica, having not just fallen off the turnip truck is no doubt aware of — his comments about A-Rod “lawyering up” are nothing more than cynical sensationalism in the service of cheap and easy potshots against a favorite target.

Or as Lupica calls it: Monday.

  1. Joey B - Mar 15, 2010 at 8:49 AM

    “Against that backdrop — a backdrop that Lupica, having not just fallen off the turnip truck is no doubt aware of — his comments about A-Rod “lawyering up” are nothing more than cynical sensationalism in the service of cheap and easy potshots against a favorite target.”
    I don’t think that’s how he meant it. Anyone not bringing a lawyer with them when talking to the feds is insane.
    However, I think he used the phrase in regard to ARod lawyering up to the press and the public. There is nothing wrong with flying up to Canada to get some aspirin or Advil. He’s not legally obliged to inform his PCP or his employer, though his $300,000,000 contract does stipulate that.
    I think what Lupica is getting at is, why doesn’t ARod simply tell the press why he needed to go to Canada for an anti-inflammatory. Think of it this way, if you went down to the corner for some aspirin, and upon your return, your wife asked you where you were, would you tell her you went for some aspirin, or would you refuse to address her question, and if so, would you expect her to be suspicious?

  2. Lorna - Mar 15, 2010 at 8:54 AM

    Why would you speak to the media to answer questions when federal agents have already told you they want to ask you questions?
    Federal agents first.

  3. Craig Calcaterra - Mar 15, 2010 at 8:55 AM

    Anything A-Rod tells the press before talking to federal agents immediately becomes the subject of his questioning by federal agents. It increases the likelihood that he says something that, however inadvertent, gets construed as an inaccuracy or an evasion by the agents (“Mr. Rodriguez, you told the Daily News on Monday that you were only in Canada ‘a couple of times’, but we have subpoeaned records that indicate four trips to Canada. Please explain”).
    So even if that’s all Lupica is saying — and I’m not convinced that it is — it’s still off base in my view. I’d never, ever allow a client to speak to the media about something for which he is poised to be questioned about by law enforcement. It happened to me with clients in the past, and it always turned out uncomfortable and sometimes ugly for everyone involved.

  4. JasonC23 - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:02 AM

    There is a gigantic difference between my wife and the press.

  5. Jonny5 - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:14 AM

    Well, there is something fishy about A-rod being called in about this, and taking into account his surgery,it may not look too good. But it could be as simple as requested testimony in regards to another person referring him to Galea for a “certain” reason as well. Myself, I’m content with waiting to see how this all pans out.

  6. Moses Green - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:22 AM

    This is the same damn argument that a bevy of folks lined up to hurl at Mark McGwire. Ohhh.. he lawyered up. Again, bravo for the empathy, people. I know, these guys put themselves in the dunk tank. But the guys now throwing their 3 balls at the bullseye every day to dunk them had a significant part in putting them there as well.
    At this point, anyone reading Mike Lupica who is not in fact paid to do so is getting what they deserve. He just doesn’t care whether he’s being truthful or factual. I don’t know if he ever did, but he certainly doesn’t now. I consider his columns to be worth less than the pulp they’re still archaically printed on.
    The larger point here is that Bud Selig, Mike Lupica and Donald Fehr are just as guilty as any of those players. But it’s the players who sit in the dunk tank while the other guilty parties get to lob the brightly colored carny balls.

  7. Simon DelMonte - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:23 AM

    I am a Mets fan, so I really don’t want this, but…
    Beltran and Reyes are involved in this, too. And all the cheap shots are aimed at A-Rod. Either they all deserve this, or none do.
    Thus it’s exceedingly clear that this is not about HGH, or Dr. Galea. It’s about A-Rod and how much people want to get on his case. Period.
    And to think that I used to like reading Lupica’s columns.

  8. Joey B - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:24 AM

    I understand the need to be careful, but then you only feed the media machine. Suppose the highly improbable for a moment. Suppose he went to Canada once for an anti-inflammatory. Are you saying that he incurs some legal liability for telling the press that ‘he went to Canada once for an anti-inflammatory’. I don’t buy it.
    There have been times in my life where, even though I didn’t do anything illegal, circumstances about where I was might indicate the need for a lawyer. But if I went to the corner for some aspirin, I don’t need a lawyer. I am willing right here, and right now, to admit that I purchased deoderant last week.

  9. Joey B - Mar 15, 2010 at 9:48 AM

    “At this point, anyone reading Mike Lupica who is not in fact paid to do so is getting what they deserve.”
    Usually I’d agree that Lupica is almost unreadable, but he actually had two points worth talking about.
    The first, though hardly HBT related, is the almost criminal use of eniment domain.
    The second, and far more interesting, is the NYY interest in this case. They were quick to ask his agents if ARod had ever seen Galeo, to which they lied to the NYY. And they quickly and publicly announced that they had not given ARod permission to see Dr. Galeo.
    Why?
    If allowed to go Machiavellian for a second, I’d bet that they have an interest in canceling his contract. Even when he was a FA, I doubt he saw anything north of $21M pa. $30M per was a real stretch, but the NYY are rich. But now the contract is probably 100% over market. If someone who was 34, had an OPS of .933, with a surgical hip and limited range at 3B, I don’t think they’d get any more tha $60M/4, maybe $80M/5.
    Don’t think for a moment that the NYY wouldn’t do the ‘noble’ thing and cancel his contract. Did I mention that Mauer would fit perfectly under ARod’s contract?

  10. Roger Moore - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:08 AM

    There is a gigantic difference between my wife and the press.
    For one thing, statements you make to your wife are covered by spousal immunity, so she can’t be compelled to talk to the Feds about them. A rather large and important point for ARod.

  11. Roger Moore - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:15 AM

    I understand the need to be careful, but then you only feed the media machine.
    ARod is going to fuel the media machine no matter what he does. If he doesn’t talk to the press, he’ll get blasted for refusing to talk. If he talks but doesn’t say anything of substance, he’ll be blasted for refusing to talk enough. If he says something substantial, Lupica and his ilk will twist his words to make him sound as awful as possible. Once the press has decided they don’t like him, he can’t win with them no matter what he does. He might as well take the approach that doesn’t cause him potential legal problems, too.

  12. trish - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:19 AM

    What Lupica and many others fails to acknowledge is the Yankees approval of a chiropractor who is partners with Galea. Why would the Yankees go to Canada for a chiropractor. They don’t have those in NY?
    One may not need to go to Canada for a chiropractor or anti-inflammatories but why not wait until the facts come out to call foul.
    Lupica picks targets. A-Rod has been one of his since 2000. Who knew that asking the Mets for an office and a tent in a contract just once could get Lupica all over your butt for a lifetime.

  13. Church of the Perpetually Outraged - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:19 AM

    There have been times in my life where, even though I didn’t do anything illegal, circumstances about where I was might indicate the need for a lawyer. But if I went to the corner for some aspirin, I don’t need a lawyer. I am willing right here, and right now, to admit that I purchased deoderant last week.

    The problem is that it’s not that simple for Arod. Taking your same scenario, what if you find out that the local pharmacist is under investigation for illegally selling drugs to teenagers. The media then starts to ask you why you had to visit that specific doctor? Were you somehow involved in the drug scheme? How much was the doctor paying you to keep quiet?
    So while you are blindsided with this information which has nothing to do with you, wouldn’t you want a lawyer to ensure that you don’t mispeak or jumble your words a la Torii Hunter? Using specific wordage can save your own tail, like how Barry Bonds might avoid a conviction since he testified he never [i]knowingly[/i] took steroids.

  14. Ray Steele - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:25 AM

    First, is Roger Moore your real name? If so, that is awesome. Secondly, Mr. Moore is exactly right. Mr. Lupica seems to have long thought he gets paid to not like people, other than his fellow Sports Reporters panelists, and rip them. Because he isn’t Mr. Perfect (as, I suppose in the minds of most NY media, Mr. Jeter is), Mr. Rodriguez will always have media on his case no matter what he does for the rest of his life. Sure, he screwed up, but I feel sorry for him.

  15. Church of the Perpetually Outraged - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:36 AM

    What Lupica and many others fails to acknowledge is the Yankees approval of a chiropractor who is partners with Galea. Why would the Yankees go to Canada for a chiropractor. They don’t have those in NY?

    As others have mentioned, Dr. Galea has [in]direct ties to Dr. Marc Philippon, who performed the hip surgery on him. Dr. Philippon suggested a rehab doctor (name escapes me) to Arod, and Dr. Galea works with the rehab doctor.

  16. YX - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:40 AM

    Well, if the choices are between creating a media feeding frenzy or ending up behind bars (not the watering kind)…
    BTW, the magic word of the day: “is woozier”

  17. BC - Mar 15, 2010 at 10:44 AM

    Lupica is a chipwich.

  18. pd - Mar 15, 2010 at 11:10 AM

    Because he’s a public figure who’s already admitted to using illegal drugs and you would think he would be looking for every opportunity to clear his name if he didn’t do anything wrong. If he didn’t do anything wrong and he was telling the truth, he would be calling the media holding press conferences telling his side of the story. fact of the matter is he is hiding because if he talks he’s going to have to lie to cover up previous lies.

  19. Lorna - Mar 15, 2010 at 11:16 AM

    See later comments from various people as to why that should not be his first priority whether you and the media like it or not.

  20. David - Mar 15, 2010 at 11:22 AM

    See: Clinton, Bill
    Remember when a “special investigator” (special being the operative word) brought in Presiident Clinton to ask him about his involvement in the Whitewater case, and ended up impeaching him for lying about a BJ from an intern? And remember, Bill is a brilliant speaker.
    A-Rod can’t order from a McDonald’s menu without putting his foot in his mouth, and people are wondering why he doesn’t spill his guts to the Lupica’s of the world? And the Lupica’s are roasting him for saying ‘Nada’, so just imagine the treatment they would give A-Rod if he actually gave them something of substance to work with.
    I constantly marvel at how great A-Rod is for NY baseball, and how horribly he’s treated by some fans and media.

  21. -z- - Mar 15, 2010 at 11:47 AM

    With A-Rod it just never stops.

  22. YANKEES1996 - Mar 15, 2010 at 12:29 PM

    Lupica is one of the most sanctimonious writers that is out there and anything he expounds or writes about is very clearly warped by his views and opinions, which count for exactly nothing in my opinion. He has on every occassion made it painfully clear that he is going to get his pound of flesh from A-Rod whenever any type of situation presents itself. When this entire mess was brought up I and most other people knew that there was no way A-Rod would even come close to getting a fair shake and thanks to those writers like Lupica that is the way it is going to go. Afterall, it is almost baseball season and it is time for a good A-Rod scandal and Lupica and his cronies are more than happy to oblige.

  23. Omega in Colorado - Mar 15, 2010 at 12:36 PM

    I think A-Rod has some amazingly good lawyers in his corner advising him to not speak to the media untill the investigation is over, or at least his involvement in it.

  24. danny - Mar 15, 2010 at 12:57 PM

    Alex gives the impression to me that he has taken and tried any and everything that anyone may have mentioned giving one an advantage, he is so full of himself that he can afford to buy his way out of whatever he does. To bad that in today’s money mad society he does and will continue to get away with this as long as he puts money in the proper hands. Zero tolerance is the way to go in Pro Sports(All of them)as it is the workplace, If you test positive your give up your salary and have a permanet ban, that is what would happen at the workplace where I work.

  25. Mike G. - Mar 15, 2010 at 1:13 PM

    Craig is dead-on here. Innocent or guilty, anyone with half a brain would get a laywer if they were talking to the cops.

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