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Taser-boy apologizes; Phillies change their security procedures

May 6, 2010, 8:16 AM EST

taser kid closeup.jpgThe 17-year-old who ran around Citizens Bank Ballpark like a fool and then got tased has issued an apology. Well, at least his attorney did on his behalf.

The kid — Steven Consalvi —  “knows that he committed a
foolish act and is truly sorry for his actions,” and he wants to apologize “to the fans, the team, the Philadelphia Police
Department and ballpark security workers.”  The attorney says that the family hopes that people understand “teenagers do impulsive
things.”

I have no idea why, but after hearing that I’m sort of reminded of this old Kids in the Hall sketch.

In other news, the Phillies have decided that the use of force is not needed simply because someone jumps on the field during the game. Going forward, the team has decided, Phillies team security will apprehend fans who jump on the field and city police will not become involved unless it is deemed necessary.

What’s this “deemed necessary” business?  Didn’t the Phillies get the memo that any person who steps foot on a field could have knives and bazookas and smart bombs and stuff and must be stopped with extreme prejudice?  Jeez, it’s almost like they want to assess threats for what they are rather than fear the unknown and treat people like they forfeited all of their their Constitutional rights simply because they trespassed.

What is this world coming to?

  1. Megary - May 6, 2010 at 8:33 AM

    And in another news item, they’re building a new highway in Tibet.
    It’s going to run all the way from Tibet to Mongolia.
    They say it will cut 5 hours off the trip for everybody.

  2. Ron - May 6, 2010 at 8:34 AM

    Don’t forget, they’re also terrorists. Should have had Homeland Security and TSA involved. Then we would have really been safe.

  3. The Common Man - May 6, 2010 at 8:35 AM

    I’m sorry I caused all that cancer.
    I still love that line…and use it. Yes, I’m pathetic.

  4. Dr Paisley - May 6, 2010 at 8:42 AM

    Didn’t the Phillies get the memo that any person who steps foot on a field could have . . . bazookas
    You’re referring to that terrorist of yore, Morganna the Kissing Bandit, right?
    “that strewn”

  5. crotch_jenkins - May 6, 2010 at 9:09 AM

    That’s right, anyone who jumps onto the field could be a suicide bomber. Because there’s no more effective place for a bomber to set himself off than the middle of an empty field. Especially not the crowded stands he just jumped out of.

  6. Dan W - May 6, 2010 at 9:20 AM

    Perhaps MLB should institute a “No-Anywhere near the field list”.

  7. Jonny5 - May 6, 2010 at 9:21 AM

    Well now isn’t that better? I mean everyone’s happy now. The cop didn’t get desk duty, because by law, he was within reason. And the kid say’s sorry, which everyone believes since anyone with a brain would be sorry for doing something that got you Tasered, on national television. Although the kid is said to be brainless, the guy from the next night was actually brain dead, yet he escaped the evil electronic causer of death, and destruction, or most likely a few seconds of being immobilized. And Philly has decided to keep the harbinger’s of said death, destruction, and/or temporary immobilization on the sideline until it’s determined their tools of death, destruction, and/or temporary immobilization are absolutely needed. Yes!!! Did i cover it all? This is a good ending afterall.

  8. David - May 6, 2010 at 9:22 AM

    Anyone who even ENTERS a stadium could have a knife or bazooka on them and COULD be planning to run onto the field! Just tase everyone upon entering and then pat them down as they lie on the ground. Then there’s no danger that they’ll use the knife or bazooka against the officer doing the pat down.
    Problem solved.

  9. Joey B - May 6, 2010 at 9:32 AM

    “Anyone who even ENTERS a stadium could have a knife or bazooka on them and COULD be planning to run onto the field! Just tase everyone upon entering and then pat them down as they lie on the ground.”
    I assume you don’t get to a lot of games. They already pat you down for weapons though, according to you guys, they shouldn’t need to, since no one would ever bring a weapon into the stadium with an intent to use it.

  10. Jacob - May 6, 2010 at 9:38 AM

    Where are you going to games? I’ve never been patted down. Women get their purses checked, but no one has ever tried to frisk me.

  11. Joey B - May 6, 2010 at 9:38 AM

    “Well now isn’t that better? I mean everyone’s happy now. The cop didn’t get desk duty, because by law, he was within reason. And the kid say’s sorry, which everyone believes since anyone with a brain would be sorry for doing something that got you Tasered, on national television.”
    I agree. The kid learned a lesson and will be better off for it. And its better for private security firms to handle this stuff anyway. They can give the next kid a beatdown out of sight of the press. I’m sorry, I meant a hug. They can give the kid a hug out of sight.

  12. largebill - May 6, 2010 at 9:42 AM

    Baseball is missing a great promotional idea. Turn it into a contest as this guy suggests:
    http://large-regular.blogspot.com/2010/05/tasering-im-fine-with-security-tasering.html

  13. Levi Stahl - May 6, 2010 at 9:45 AM

    Where do you go to games where they pat you down? At Wrigley Field, Comiskey Park, Miller Park, Busch Stadium, Dodger Stadium, and Anaheim, and Citi Field, the parks I’ve been to in the past year, they just check your bag.
    I’ve been patted down for concerts, but that’s always been more about keeping out illicit recording equipment and flasks than about safety. I’ve never been patted down at the ballpark, and I’d like to think that’s not on the agenda any time soon–given the number of ballpark assaults with deadly weapons in recent memory . . . none? . . . patdowns seem like they’d be yet another bit of security theater overkill.

  14. Luis - May 6, 2010 at 9:56 AM

    Maybe he’s from the 209. I hear that region is rife with hardasses.

  15. Church of the Perpetually Outraged - May 6, 2010 at 10:03 AM

    I’ve been patted down for concerts, but that’s always been more about keeping out illicit recording equipment

    Is that what kids these days are calling it, “recording devices”? :)
    also +1 to Luis

  16. LarryLongBeach - May 6, 2010 at 10:16 AM

    I’m a Met fan (that in and of itself should make me “mentally unstable” and “potentially dangerous” at the ballpark. I’ve been to Citi Field 5 or 6 times since it opened and I’d say I’ve had some form of pat down at least half of the time. Usually it’s just a quick smack of my pockets or my jacket, and even when they hit my phone or my camera, they don;t bother to ask me to show it. Still…it is VERY common, particularly in NYC area parks (like every Jet game I went to last year) to at least get a cursory pat down.
    Hmm…why does a “cursory pat down” sound dirty. It’s no rusty trumbone, but still.

  17. Judi - May 6, 2010 at 10:51 AM

    I’m disappointed, Craig. No mention that most of the ballplayers were in favor of the tasing, saying you never know what can happen when a person runs onto the field? You have made it sound like it is ridiculous to think anyone running onto a field of play would mean harm, when we know that is just not the case.

  18. Joey B - May 6, 2010 at 10:55 AM

    “Still…it is VERY common, particularly in NYC area parks (like every Jet game I went to last year) to at least get a cursory pat down.”
    That’s my experience also. Everyone at Yankee Stadium has to raise the hands, every cell phone gets opened, and every bag gets searched. Same with Shea. To be honest, I don’t remember the same level of scrutiny at MSG, but their issues go well beyond security.
    It could be that NYC is also a fairly high profile target.

  19. Craig Calcaterra - May 6, 2010 at 10:56 AM

    I wasn’t aware that the use of force was a majority rules kind of thing. Where I come from the Constitution decides that. I mean, I’d like the police to tase the kids that walk across my lawn too, but they’re probably wise not to do what I say on that count.
    But for what it’s worth, the Phillies as an organization has decided that they don’t want police involved unless absolutely necessary. If you’re going to look to personal sentiment on the matter, you can’t ignore that.

  20. Joey B - May 6, 2010 at 10:58 AM

    “Maybe he’s from the 209. I hear that region is rife with hardasses.”
    BTW, what is the 209? Sounds like fun.

  21. Andy L - May 6, 2010 at 11:00 AM

    BWAHAHAHA
    Love this so much.

  22. Joey B - May 6, 2010 at 11:04 AM

    “I wasn’t aware that the use of force was a majority rules kind of thing. Where I come from the Constitution decides that.”
    Those guys were pretty smart, but I don’t recall them addressing Taser issues. Therefore, like many other things, it is left open to interpretation. Once left up to interpretation, then it segues its way into majority rule. That means there is a 99% chance that this will not be a Constitutional issue.
    By all means, bring it up to the SC, or to Congress, but it is pretty much DOA.

  23. Judi - May 6, 2010 at 11:30 AM

    Oh don’t get all lawyerly, I was merely pointing out that it isn’t so crazy to think it could be a dangerous situation and that the people who it directly affects, i.e. the ballplayers, are in favor of doing whatever necessary to detain someone who breaks the law and jumps onto the field. Maybe you wouldn’t be scared to see a loony tune running at you from right field, but I would be, and it sounds like the ballplayers feel the same.

  24. Jonny5 - May 6, 2010 at 11:52 AM

    Because people in crowd must be considered as not a threat until it’s proven otherwise. Like this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vl-2uVhNLJI&feature=related And like this.

  25. Jack Marshall - May 6, 2010 at 12:00 PM

    Craig, I’d sure like to see your authority for the proposition that using a taser on a trespasser who refuses to stop when ordered by a police officer is a violation of his Constitutional rights. (It isn’t.)

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