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The Yankees protest last night's game

May 19, 2010, 10:36 AM EDT

Beckett back.jpgUPDATE:  It appears I misinterpreted the use of the term “indication of injury” in the AP story.  The beef was not that Girardi thought there was no evidence that Beckett was injured.  Rather, he was protesting the fact that Delcarmen was called for before the umpires were informed that Beckett was injured (i.e. it was “indicated’ that he was injured).  My bad on misinterpreting that.

That said, it hardly matters. If the focus of the protest is the exact order of the switch — that the umps should have been told before the signal went down to the pen — we’re in the land of overly-legalistic b.s.  Technically wrong to do things in that order? Sure. But everyone knew what the situation was within the about 10 seconds, it was right to give Delcarmen as many pitches he needed because there was an injury, and there was ultimately no harm done to anyone as a result.

8:43 A.M.: One last bit from the Yankees-Red Sox game:  Joe Girardi finished the game under protest.  That never works, but it’s fun all the same.

The basis of the protest: Josh Beckett gave up a two-run double to Robinson Cano, after which Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell went out to the mound. Beckett and Farrell talked things over, but then Farrell motioned to the bullpen for Manny Delcarmen to come into the game.  Beckett then left with the trainer, as he was suffering from back tightness.  Because it’s an injury situation, Delcarmen got as many warmup pitches as he wanted.

The Yankees protested this because, according to the AP story, “there was no indication of an
injury to Beckett by that point.”

To which I ask, what “indication” is necessary?  Must Beckett hop around holding his toe as if a cartoon anvil fell on it?  Does Joe Girardi need to to see little animated lighting bolts and ouchy marks flashing around Beckett’s lower back?  The guy left with the trainer, and I’m sure someone on the field said something about an injury, if not immediately, then as soon as Girardi asked about it. While I suppose it’s possible that this was all a big conspiracy to cover for the fact that Francona didn’t get Delcarmen up in the pen fast enough, it’s not like Beckett hasn’t had back issues already this season.

The chances of this protest being upheld are virtually nill so who cares, but even as far as unsuccessful protests go, this one seems rather weak.  

  1. Moses Green - May 19, 2010 at 1:46 PM

    Try to pay attention. Beckett missed his last start with back spasms. Missed his last start. Not disabled list, not 18 months ago, his last start. Last week.
    There, get it yet? Moron.

  2. JudyJ - May 19, 2010 at 1:58 PM

    I agree with most of your comments and commend you on maintaining a sense of dignity rather than reverting to the old namecalling and chest thumping tactics shown above on this board on both sides.
    However, I do have to point out that “having an essentially unlimited payroll” is a valid point – yes, I am a Yankee fan, and yes, you are a Red Sox fan. However you are remiss in the “fact” that both teams went after the same talent many, many times in the past few years – or at least in the last decade – and most times the Red Sox management came up short. Now let’s get real here – both teams are highly paid, and both teams are somewhat comparable in the talent department (though at this time not exactly equal)- that tells us that your upper management “cheaped out” at the last minute on some big acquisitions. This leads to the conclusion that both teams could afford the talent, but one team refused to go all out to close those deals. That said, let’s give that “unlimited payroll” remark a rest – it’s old news at this point in time.

  3. JudyJ - May 19, 2010 at 1:59 PM

    However, I do have to point out that “having an essentially unlimited payroll” is a valid point – yes, I am a Yankee fan, and yes, you are a Red Sox fan. However you are remiss in the “fact” that both teams went after the same talent many, many times in the past few years – or at least in the last decade – and most times the Red Sox management came up short. Now let’s get real here – both teams are highly paid, and both teams are somewhat comparable in the talent department (though at this time not exactly equal)- that tells us that your upper management “cheaped out” at the last minute on some big acquisitions. This leads to the conclusion that both teams could afford the talent, but one team refused to go all out to close those deals. That said, let’s give that “unlimited payroll” remark a rest – it’s old news at this point in time.

  4. STP - May 19, 2010 at 3:01 PM

    JudyJ, it is good to be able to actually have a logical and constructive conversation rather than result to name-calling. I half totally agree with your post and half do not, but I don’t think you would beseech me the ability to have my opinion so I will continue. As a Red Sox fan it infuriates me that our team so often sets a hard line market value for players and then refuses to budge and watches the ARod/Damon/Pedro/Bay/Tex all fly by the wayside. Its very annoying to experience and while I understand the economics involved, its hard to accept fully when they turn around and drop $14M on JD Drew and $8M on Cameron. So you are correct that it is annoying to see Sox Management not “go the extra mile for our fans” as Steinbrenner so needlingly accurately put it. But whatever artificial or real financial constraints the Red Sox management caps our seasons with, the simple fact remains that the Sox and Yankees payrolls are NOT equal, and they are not even close. The past two seasons the Red Sox have placed 4th and 5th in overall payroll, being eclipsed by $80M in both seasons by the Yankees (an extra 70% of our payroll), AND we have played within and stayed under the soft salary cap. So, to summarize, it is INFURIATING that Sox Management won’t go the extra mile to sign the big talent, but its also INFURIATING that we so often HAVE to go the extra mile because of the Yankees perennial disregard for the cap and the rest of the competition. And, frankly, neither of those things will ever be old news. (especially when you just signed Beltre/Cameron/Scutaro and watched idly/lost all the waging wars for the past two FA crops and your team is sitting at .500).

  5. baseball guy - May 19, 2010 at 4:20 PM

    This writer is clearly a redsox fan… Personally I am a mets fan. After reading this i just have to say it was HORRIBLY written. Usually when there is an injury the manager and trainer come out…talk things over..then they signal to the bullpen…here the pitching coach came out and just immediate signaled to the bullpen b4 talking much. And right b4 he signaled they were pulling the tarp off in the bullpen so Manny could get ready…clearly the redsox just faked an injury because they know the yankees would own Beckett like they always do. anyways this writer sucks and is extremely biased.. shouldn’t even have a job. Go Mets!!!!!

  6. MAC - May 19, 2010 at 4:49 PM

    I REMEMBER WHEN THE YANKS WON THEIR 3RD AND 4TH RINGS. WE CAN GIVE YOU 10 RINGS AND STILL BE UP BY 10. 2ND RATE ORGANIZATION. THE CAPTAIN OF YOUR TEAM IS PLAYING THE ROLE OF BAT BOY.

  7. JudyJ - May 19, 2010 at 4:49 PM

    I never thought of the bidding war in quite the same context as above; but, I can see the merits of that point of view. I am not sure that I agree totally about the Yankees waiting around and then trumping any other offers. I don’t think that was the case in the A-Rod negotiations anyway. Texiera seemed to want to come to New York and listened to other offers in good faith (I’m not sure about Texiera, however.) What I can offer you is that every team has to go through a phase of change (because personnel ages, insuries, etc) and sometimes a team has to wait a season for either free agents to restock their teams or for minor league players to develop appropriately. I think the Red Sox management can/could spend more money but it is all contingent on what the owner wants to spend, and your owner doesn’t want to spend that addtional money. I am sure you are disheartened to see Cliff Lee coming available again soon. No matter what – you have to admit – when the Yankees and Sawks play nobody ever knows what is going to happen. Yikes – Chamberlain and Rivera blowing a save situation – twice in one week? Go figure.

  8. jake - May 19, 2010 at 5:02 PM

    Heard it from who? A 12 year old? Blosox?
    And the yankee comeback started on an error. Did you forget that einstein?

  9. jake - May 19, 2010 at 5:04 PM

    The J.D. Drew contract is right in line with his production. And the sox would have been crazy to give pedro what he wanted. Check out how many victories he had in his seasons with the mets.
    Do you even watch the red sox?

  10. jake - May 19, 2010 at 5:07 PM

    “Basically we’re batting .310 when it comes to rings.”
    You’re not batting anything. You’re sitting in your mothers basement typing on a a keyboard. What is it with yankee fans believing ‘they’re’ on the field doing something great? You chose to root for the team with the highest payroll. Good job. Want a cookie?

  11. jake - May 19, 2010 at 5:12 PM

    Both teams do not have the same resources. So you’re starting from a false premise. The Red Sox are a wealthy team, but the Yankees are far wealthier. I know that sucks to think that your team wins because of money, and it’s easier to just say the Red Sox are cheap, but it might be time you face reality.

  12. jah - May 19, 2010 at 8:19 PM

    Rule 8.03 reads as follows:
    When a pitcher takes his position at the beginning of each inning, or when he relieves another pitcher, he shall be permitted to pitch not to exceed eight preparatory pitches to his catcher during which play shall be suspended. A league by its own action may limit the number of preparatory pitches to less than eight preparatory pitches. Such preparatory pitches shall not consume more than one minute of time. If a sudden emergency causes a pitcher to be summoned into the game without any opportunity to warm up, the umpire-in-chief shall allow him as many pitches as the umpire deems necessary.
    Where does it say that there has to be an “indication of injury” before a signal is given to the bullpen?
    @Steve A: There is a specific rule on the double switch. Rule 3.03 states:
    When two or more substitute players of the defensive team enter the game at the same time, the manager shall, immediately before they take their positions as fielders, designate to the umpire in chief such players’ positions in the team’s batting order and the umpire in chief shall so notify the official scorer. If this information is not immediately given to the umpire in chief, he shall have authority to designate the substitutes’ places in the batting order.

  13. JudyJ - May 20, 2010 at 9:26 AM

    I really don’t care that my team (in your mind) wins because of money – they win. That doesn’t change the fact that if the Red Sox wanted to win they can also win because of money and they chose not to. Don’t cry to me about it – and I don’t find it insulting in any way. In case you haven’t heard – this is America and money talks.

  14. Star777 - May 20, 2010 at 12:06 PM

    Baseball is a business, just like any other business the more successful you are as an organization the more money you make. Obviously this franchise has been run by great minds that know how to make money. When you own a lucrative business you re-invest in it to make it an even greater success and thats what the yankees do. I’m sure the less-successful organizations do not mind sharing profits with the yankees. We do what we do because were are able to. If the yankees were not a worldwide brand we would not be able to do so, the yankees have earned every right to pay their players as much as they do. We have also seen with teams like the rays that salaries are not everything. And i say “we” when i speak of the yankees because yankee fans are like a family, go to the bronx and feel the electricity there is nothing like it.

  15. JudyJ - May 21, 2010 at 1:16 PM

    I agree and the only reason “salary isn’t everything with the Rays” is because “there is no reason to think about salary because they aren’t going to get it until they leave.” Their stadium is never even half full – unless the Yankees or Red Sox are there.

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