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Good luck with that trade, Mr. Francoeur

Aug 11, 2010, 5:33 PM EDT

I call him “Mr. Fancoeur” because it just sounded so fun in that Wall Street Journal article I linked to this morning. I know that WSJ and the New York Times use “Mr.” and “Ms.” as a convention, but the convention really doesn’t work in sports articles. Did they do this when pro wrestling was pushing mainstream in the mid 80s? “Mr. Beefcake?” Would it have been “Mr. Albano” or would they have gone with the more formal title for “Captain” Lou? I digress.

The point to this post is to link to Howard Megdal’s analysis of Jeff Francoeur’s chances of being traded, as he has so demanded.  Howard’s piece provides a wonderful walk down bad-to-mediocre corner outfielder memory lane, and concludes by noting that, if history is any guide, ain’t no one gonna trade nothing for no Jeff Francoeur.

But let’s be clear about something: I don’t fault Jeff Francoeur for asking to be traded. On some level all athletes should feel like they’re awesome and should be playing all the time. The second they stop feeling that way, at least a little bit, is the second they lose their competitive edge.  Good for Mr. Francoeur for not losing confidence in himself.

No, my issue is this whole media campaign and his agents demands of the Mets that her client be given playing time. That’s just loopy. Keep that stuff quiet.   

  1. El Bravo - Aug 11, 2010 at 5:50 PM

    “ain’t no one gonna trade nothing for no Jeff Francoeur”
    negative + negative + negative + negative = POSITIVE (good news for Frankie!!)
    P.S. As a Braves fan, I say, suck it Frankie and suck it Mets! You belong together!
    P.P.S. If OBP is so important then why don’t they put in on the scoreboard, huh? (um, they do)

  2. samdaddy - Aug 11, 2010 at 6:35 PM

    I love the NY Times and their use of the formal “Mr.” when referring to people (who usually never get referred to in that manner). My all-time favorite was from the late-70s in a review of the album “Bat Out Of Hell” when the reviewer referred to the singer of the album as “Mr. Loaf.” Classic.

  3. samdaddy - Aug 11, 2010 at 6:36 PM

    I love the NY Times and their use of the formal “Mr.” when referring to people (who usually never get referred to in that manner). My all-time favorite was from the late-70s in a review of the album “Bat Out Of Hell” when the reviewer referred to the singer of the album as “Mr. Loaf.” Classic.

  4. JEP2 - Aug 11, 2010 at 6:38 PM

    That newspaper style convention has always bothered me in the sports context as well. When I ran our small campus newspaper in college, I convinced the faculty advisors to let the sports section be an exception and not follow that element of our paper’s style.
    PS- the awkwardness of that style decision works great in the music/entertainment sections also – “Mr. Doggy Dogg” and “Mr. Loaf” immediately come to mind.

  5. Levi Stahl - Aug 11, 2010 at 7:02 PM

    My favorite instance of the Times‘s naming convention came in a review of Guns-n-Roses”s album Chinese Democracy, in which they described the contributions of band members Mr. Brain and Mr. Buckethead, while lamenting the absence of the guitar work of Mr. Slash.

  6. Anon - Aug 11, 2010 at 9:13 PM

    The Times doesn’t use “Mr.” or “Ms.” in its sports stories. Thus further proving its superiority over the WSJ.
    JEP2, I too fondly recall “Mr. Loaf.”

  7. Cam Winston - Aug 11, 2010 at 10:09 PM

    /// The Times doesn’t use “Mr.” or “Ms.” in its sports stories. ///
    Still doesn’t make up for publishing our military secrets in order to harm an administration that they disliked. The Mets, Francoeur, NYT and their limp-wristed subscribers can ALL suck it.

  8. Glenn - Aug 11, 2010 at 11:13 PM

    Mssrs Top for ZZ and Mr Top for Carrot?

  9. Benny Blanco - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:01 AM

    I still say the Braves did the Mets a favor by taking Church.

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