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Quote of the Day: K-Rod-punches-out-his-father-in-law edition

Aug 12, 2010, 8:23 AM EDT

Clearly, K-Rod assaulting his wife's old man last night was the result of media pressure.

“It all adds up to a “(expletive) you” edge that the Mets lack. From the
general manager to the coaching staff to the star players to Chris
Carter and Jesus Feliciano, they are almost all nice people. Maybe too
nice.”

The New York Daily News’ Andy Martino, writing last Friday about the Mets’ lack of swagger.

While I don’t think this is exactly what Martino had in mind, if I’m K-Rod’s lawyer, I totally lay this at his feet. Get me just one Post reader on that jury, and my man walks, I tell ya!

  1. Kevin S. - Aug 12, 2010 at 8:49 AM

    Get one Post reader on any jury, and logic goes out the window anyway.

  2. BC - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:05 AM

    And now, simply because I need to just take my Mets and completely remove any trace of them from my brain lest I go completely duicghdsfighsfbndsgfhfdg at the way things have gone this season, I give the audience this excerpt from Death In Venice by Thomas Mann, for your reading pleasure.
    When he was seven he was sent to school, and now the years passed uniformly and rapidly. Every day, walking past the gabled houses and shops with the quaintly solemn gait that deformed people often have, he made his way to the old schoolhouse with its Gothic vaulting; and at home, when he had done his homework, he would perhaps read some of his beautiful books with their brightly colored illustrations, or potter about in the garden, while his sisters kept house for their ailing mother. The girls also went to parties, for the Friedemanns moved in the best local society; but unfortunately none of the three had yet married, for their family fortune was by no means large and they were distinctly plain.
    Johannes, too, occasionally got an invitation from one or other of his contemporaries, but it was no great pleasure for him to associate with them. He was unable to join in their games, and since they always treated him with embarrassed reserve, it was impossible for any real companionship to develop.
    Later there came a time when he would often hear them discuss certain matters in the school yard; wide-eyed and attentive, he would listen in silence as they talked of their passions for this little girl or that. Such experiences, he decided, obviously engrossing though they were for the others, belonged like gymnastics and ball games to the category of things for which he was not suited. This was at times a rather saddening thought; but after all, he had long been accustomed to going his own way and not sharing the interests of other people.
    It nevertheless came to pass—he was sixteen years old at the time—that he found himself suddenly enamored of a girl of his own age. She was the sister of one of his classmates, a blond, exuberant creature whom he had met at her brother’s house. He felt a strange uneasiness in her company, and the studied self-conscious cordiality with which she too treated him saddened him profoundly.

  3. Simon DelMonte - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:09 AM

    No excusing this act of stupid violence (though I bet by tonight there are as many unhappily married men applauding this as there are angry retail workers applauding that flight attendant’s tirade). But it does fit with a man who plays with maybe a bit too much fire, and who is an extreme example of what we see from a lot of relievers these days.
    Here’s what makes Mo different. He never loses control of his emotions any more than of his pitches. The fiery closer, talent aside, will inevitably lose control of his calm, and sometimes the game, in a way that Mo doesn’t.

  4. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:13 AM

    It takes a long passage from something as sublime as “Death in Venice” to blot out the fecal stain of a mere mention of the New York Pestilence. If Craig had quoted any more of it, you’d’ve needed to reproduce the entirety of The Magic Mountain. However, what your teamreally needs is a couple of passages from “Mario and the Magician,” and maybe a little hint about where to turn for help from Goethe’s Faust.

  5. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:14 AM

    Not to mention taste.

  6. Ditto65 - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:17 AM

    So, Johannes represents the Mets, and his contemporaries are obviously the rest of baseball?

  7. BC - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:25 AM

    Pretty much.

  8. BC - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:27 AM

    OK…. Because the audience demands it… we bring you… Geothe!
    “Despise reason and science,
    humankind’s greatest powers,
    indulge in illusions and magical practices
    that reinforce your self-deception,
    and you will be unconditionally lost.”
    Now if THAT doesn’t sum up the Mets, what does?

  9. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 9:53 AM

    Not comparable. Mo is a replicant without an expiration setting.

  10. BC - Aug 12, 2010 at 10:16 AM

    Papelbon is a complete nutcase hothead with an IQ only slightly above a dead houseplant. But last time I checked, he’s been pretty good the last 4 or 5 years.

  11. Xpensive Wino - Aug 12, 2010 at 11:17 AM

    I think he’ll be going with the patented “It Wasn’t Me” defense.

  12. BC - Aug 12, 2010 at 12:00 PM

    Or maybe the Brian Cushing “overtrained athelete” defense.

  13. G2 - Aug 12, 2010 at 1:24 PM

    Maybe he’ll go with the “southern conservative hillbilly couldn’t handle the stress of the Big Apple” defense

  14. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 1:35 PM

    …except that that passage is from “Little Herr Friedemann,” not from “Death in Venice,” I think.

  15. dprat - Aug 12, 2010 at 1:36 PM

    Pretty sure that the classmate’s sister is Francoeur.

  16. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 1:37 PM

    Or maybe the “el bastardo singando lo tenía el venir” defense.

  17. Old Gator - Aug 12, 2010 at 5:14 PM

    Not pretty much, definitely. Johannes was dropped on his head as a baby. That’s why he’s all bent out of shape. It’s all right there in “Little Herr Friedemann.”

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