Skip to content

Ike Davis will play tonight

Sep 17, 2010, 8:47 AM EDT

We usually hear about Yom Kippur and baseball when the holiday impacts a Jewish player during the playoffs. This year Yom Kippur does not occur during the playoffs — it begins at sundown tonight and lasts until sunset tomorrow — and Ike Davis certainly does not have any playoff plans this year. But his team does play the Braves tonight and they still have some hope, rendering his decision to play or not to play at least somewhat meaningful for baseball purposes. What say you Ike?*

The verdict: Davis left the decision to his mother.

She leaned
toward sitting out, but told Davis to do whatever he felt was right.
Davis then decided he will play in Friday’s series opener against the
Atlanta Braves.

I guess “asking your mother what she wants and then doing the opposite” is, in its own way, leaving the decision up to her. In this Davis is a lot like my boy is turning out to be. Hopefully for my and Mrs. Davis’ sake our sons put us in nice nursing homes one day. They owe us that much.

*For the record, Davis does not practice Judaism, nor was he brought up doing so, but according to the linked article his mother is Jewish and practiced herself and she had relatives who died in the Holocaust, and the decision to play or not to play was a serious consideration for the family. 

  1. jolt12 - Sep 17, 2010 at 9:40 AM

    “for the record”—–if Davis wants to talk about his religion, fine. But most certainly it is nobody else’s business. There was a nation where you had to wear identifying armbands. America destroyed them. Two things I don’t trust—-people who loudly make a point of having you know about their beliefs and people who make a point of asking you about your beliefs. I keep both of them away from children.

  2. Snappy - Sep 17, 2010 at 9:49 AM

    Agreed, although America had a little help with the armband guys

  3. jolt12 - Sep 17, 2010 at 9:55 AM

    Totally no argument there.

  4. Dan in Katonah - Sep 17, 2010 at 11:47 AM

    Since he was not raised Jewish, I think that Ike missed the point of what his mother said. From personal experience, any good Jewish boy knows that when your mother says “do what you think is right” red-lights start flashing. This is code for if you do what you are thinking of doing, you will rip out my heart and possibly hasten my death. I’m sure other cultures use the passive-aggressive guilt trip, but we certainly have perfected it over the millenia.
    “Ike, you don’t call, you don’t come by? What? Now that you are a big baseball star you don’t have time for your mother? Mrs. Youklis’ son bought her a nice house and calls her every day. But you, you do what you think is right…”

  5. Old Gator - Sep 17, 2010 at 12:22 PM

    Boy, was that gambit practiced to classical perfection in my family. Years and years ago my uncle Maury, who made a…uh…religious practice of calling my grandmother five times a week went into Mt. Sinai to have a suspicious polyp removed from his sinus. Painful post-op. They kept him sedated for a few days and he of course didn’t call the Bubbeh. When he was lucid enough to call her almost a week later, she was absolutely frosty at the other end of the phone. Moische, you don’t call me for a veek? A veek???? – Ma, I’m sorry, I’ve been in the hospital – they had to fix my sinuses. I was under sedation. I’m sorry. – Oh, you ver seek? – Yeah ma, I was sick. I was under sedation. – Oh, tank Gott. I thought you ver vell.
    .
    True story.
    .
    Having said that, I’m thrilled that it’s Yom Kippur already. I think of it as the gateway to stone crab season.

  6. Marty Winn - Sep 17, 2010 at 1:10 PM

    “”for the record”—–if Davis wants to talk about his religion, fine. But most certainly it is nobody else’s business. There was a nation where you had to wear identifying armbands. America destroyed them. Two things I don’t trust—-people who loudly make a point of having you know about their beliefs and people who make a point of asking you about your beliefs. I keep both of them away from children.”
    But you tell us of your beliefs concerning talking about beliefs. I think you should have kept it to yourself if you wanted to be consistent. Religious beliefs are personal but they need not be private. Surely something that impacts eternal destiny is worthy of being discussed and debated. Even warning people when they are in error (in your opinion). We do it about much less important things. Proselytizing/evangelism is a major tenant/requirement in many religions.
    If you reject hearing about it then you should be left alone. Nor should you be forced to speak of your beliefs but neither should I be made to shut up about mine in the public sphere. No one is making Davis discuss his beliefs. He chose to and I am interested to hear.

  7. Simon DelMonte - Sep 17, 2010 at 1:31 PM

    Well, if Ike changes his mind and wants to attend services, my synagogue is two miles from Citi Field. He should be warned that the rabbis and the majority of the congregants are Yankee fans.

  8. Dan in Katonah - Sep 17, 2010 at 1:58 PM

    Probably a tougher ticket to get than Citi Field.
    You should all atone for Jeter.

  9. jolt12 - Sep 17, 2010 at 2:02 PM

    Far away from children.

  10. NicoSamuelson2 - Sep 17, 2010 at 2:04 PM

    Take that, Keith Law! ; )

  11. milt - Sep 19, 2010 at 12:20 PM

    I was disappointed that Ike played on Yom Kippur. I thought he had an obligation to be a role model to the Jewish community. His being Jewish was certainly played up in the tri-state area. In fact, I was given a gift for my birthday of a baseball from Ike which was signed not only with his name but “mazel tov” [Jewish for congratulations, good luck, good fortune]. When I got it this summer I was thrilled to have a memento of a Jewish ballplayer in New York playing for my team, the Mets. Now, its just another ball without the meaning I thought it had. He had the chance to take his place with Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg. He struck out and this one hurt the team.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Yanks, Cards and Reds hit with injury bug
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. C. Gonzalez (2611)
  2. J. Votto (2551)
  3. E. Encarnacion (2408)
  4. M. Tanaka (2408)
  5. J. Nelson (2314)
  1. M. Trumbo (2314)
  2. R. Braun (2286)
  3. J. Samardzija (2239)
  4. B. Hamilton (2140)
  5. V. Martinez (2097)