Skip to content

Scott Boras proposes posting fees for minor leaguers

Nov 29, 2010, 9:22 AM EDT

boras

Ken Rosenthal passes on a bright idea from Scott Boras: a minor league posting system:

Each team would protect a set number of players: 40, the current number, or maybe even 45. Every other player in a club’s farm system would be available through a blind posting process similar to the arrangement baseball maintains with Japanese clubs.

In Boras’ vision: A prospect-rich team such as the Royals could sell off unprotected young players in return for money they could redirect toward free major-league agents. A club deep in young pitchers, but not position players, could use the process to create more balance, selling one type of player and buying another. If a team preferred to keep a player another club wanted, it would match the posting price and send the money back the other way.

I agree with Rosenthal’s assessment: interesting, but there just isn’t the kind of talent off of 40-man rosters to justify creating that kind of system. I mean, sure, ideally each team is totally aware of all of the talent available or potentially available, but if you get into posting all of the minor leaguers, teams will have to put a hell of a lot more money and effort into tracking these guys. I just don’t see how the reward will outweigh the necessary cash outlay.

Also, given what we’ve seen from some teams in terms of hording cash and going low-money on amateur signings, I don’t think we want to create any system under which a team can sell off young talent like this. What are the odds that the money gained on posting fees would be plowed into free agency? Pretty low in some cities, I imagine.

Fun, but no thanks.

  1. Jason @ IIATMS - Nov 29, 2010 at 9:29 AM

    Now, if the posting fees are not subject to the lux tax/rev sharing calculations, won’t the uber-rich teams be able to just spend like crazy, under-the-table-like, to scarf up the best of the unprotected? Of course, the limits of the protectables might preclude this.

    Interesting, but I can’t see it, either.

  2. bloodysock - Nov 29, 2010 at 9:37 AM

    I’d like to see a posting fee for Boras – bail.

  3. BC - Nov 29, 2010 at 9:46 AM

    If you upped it to like 60 protected players, it might work.

  4. ThatGuy - Nov 29, 2010 at 9:54 AM

    It could work, but the team doing the bidding would have to put the player on the 25 man roster I would think. There is no point to transfering from one minor league system to another.

  5. The Baseball Idiot - Nov 29, 2010 at 9:58 AM

    That’s a great idea by Boras. Create more free agents that he will then sign as his clients, thereby increasing his income.

    Becasue I’m sure Boras is only looking out for the welfare of the players, and isn’t concerned about anything else.

  6. Jonny 5 - Nov 29, 2010 at 10:16 AM

    *A prospect-rich team such as the Royals could “sell off” unprotected young players in return for “money” they could redirect toward free major-league agents.

    Key words, “Sell off” and “money”

    *A club deep in young pitchers, but not position players, could use the process to create more balance, selling one type of player and buying another.

    Key words “selling” and “buying”

    *If a team preferred to keep a player another club wanted, it would match the posting price and send the money back the other way.

    Key words “posting price” and “money”

    “It would create a currency in the game,” Boras says. “It also would create an excitement in the game. It would be like a mini-free agent period. You would have a 40-man roster that really means something.”

    Key words “currency” and “excitement”

    Well at least we all know where Scott’s brain is anyway… Was he even thinking about baseball in the least bit? Or is this, all about the money stupid? I mean we should always take Scott Boras seriously when he’s so determined to make everything about more money in his pockets right?

  7. dayrunner9 - Nov 29, 2010 at 10:39 AM

    the funny part is, or maybe the sad part, is that Boris has no clue that his endless (and successful) quest to drive up player compensation gives him zero credibility on any ideas to improve the game or the lot of weaker franchises. anything he says automatically has to be seen as a way to raise salaries and his own income.
    as a fan in nyc, i no longer go to games just because prices for decent seats have gotten so out of hand. thank you scott boras. you’ve always kept the best interests of the game in mind. yeah, right.

    • Alex K - Nov 29, 2010 at 10:51 AM

      Player salaries have nothing to do with ticket prices. It’s supply and demand. More people want to sit in the decent seats than number of seats = they cost more.

      • Utley's Hair - Nov 29, 2010 at 11:01 AM

        Ticket prices=revenue; higher revenue=more pay demand by players=higher ticket prices

      • Charles Gates - Nov 29, 2010 at 12:25 PM

        @Utley’s Hair: That’s not correct.
        Ticket prices will rise as fast and as far as the supply and demand equation will allow them to. Baseball is a business. Attendance drives revenue. Salaries are an expense. Certainly movement of one item on a P&L can allow for flexibility in another, but to think they work in tandem is wrong.

      • Utley's Hair - Nov 29, 2010 at 12:44 PM

        I guess my comment was overly simplistic. But my point is that they are not entirely independent of each other.

  8. Detroit Michael - Nov 29, 2010 at 12:25 PM

    MLB already has a rule 5 draft that accomplishes this to a large extent.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Who are the favorites for Rookie of the Year?
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. R. Castillo (3692)
  2. Y. Molina (3367)
  3. J. Soler (3088)
  4. D. Ortiz (2422)
  5. B. Colon (2386)
  1. D. Wright (2285)
  2. S. Doolittle (2129)
  3. Y. Darvish (2110)
  4. R. Cano (2045)
  5. T. Lincecum (2039)