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Hall of Fame voters owe nothing to the past

Jan 18, 2011, 4:30 PM EDT

cooperstown

This morning I wrote about Jim Reeves’ column in which he said he believed that voting for the Hall of Fame was his “sacred duty” and that it was his aim to keep Cooperstown “clean and pure.”

My take was more one of amusement, but this afternoon The Common Man has a much more focused takedown. After detailing just how non-sacred the vote really is and how unclean and impure the current many members of the Hall of Fame actually are, TCM nails Reeves to the wall, wondering how it was possible that, in 40 years of covering the Rangers — the Rangers! — he never wrote about PEDs in baseball until Barry Bonds was poised to break Hank Aaron’s record.* And how, in that very article, he took a shot at Jose Canseco for “violating the code of the clubhouse” in talking about it in his books.

By all means, check out TCM’s take.

*UPDATE: From TCM: “In fairness to Reeves, after some additional research I found articles in which Reeves does write about steroid use in baseball that predates the 2004 Bonds chase of the Homerun record.  Reeves did write about steroids on May 31, 2002, when he wrote that steroid users “should all be wearing a scarlet ‘S,'” and that Rusty Greer never saw steroids in the Ranger clubhouse.  He also defended Gabe Kapler against steroid accusations in August of 2000.  And on August 25, 1998, he said  that the story about Mark McGwire’s andro use “is overblown” and that “You wouldn’t begrudge Nolan Ryan his Advil, would you? Troy Aikman his Met-RX? Popeye his spinach?”  He continued to write about steroids on occasion between 2002 and 2004, all excoriating steroid users, never questioning his profession’s role in missing them for so long.”

  1. Glenn - Jan 18, 2011 at 4:46 PM

    These self-righteous reporters make me sick. I remember hearing guys like Lupica and Albom gushing about Sosa/McGuire and then clucking indignantly when they were exposed. It was obvious to any of us involved in sports (especially weight lifting) that something was going on in baseball. All you ever need is to here one of these guys talk about your local team to realize how little they know or how little they actually investigate or do their job properly.

    • BC - Jan 18, 2011 at 4:52 PM

      Albom has the worst weave and dye job I’ve ever seen. Good writer, crappy reporter and needs a new hair stylist.

  2. BC - Jan 18, 2011 at 4:51 PM

    I made my point clear earlier about what role I think writers should play in HOF voting (that would be NONE – no offense Craig). I also think the post-retirement waiting period should be shortened. Maybe 2 or 3 years? Even 1? I mean, Mario Lemieux went into the Hockey Hall Of Fame and was back playing the next year. He was retired, what, a year or something? If someone’s a Hall Of Famer when they retire, put ‘em in. Period.

  3. The Common Man/www.platoonadvantage.com - Jan 18, 2011 at 4:58 PM

    In fairness to Reeves, after some additional research I found articles in which Reeves does write about steroid use in baseball that predates the 2004 Bonds chase of the Homerun record. Reeves did write about steroids on May 31, 2002, when he wrote that steroid users “should all be wearing a scarlet ‘S,'” and that Rusty Greer never saw steroids in the Ranger clubhouse. He also defended Gabe Kapler against steroid accusations in August of 2000. And on August 25, 1998, he said that the story about Mark McGwire’s andro use “is overblown” and that “You wouldn’t begrudge Nolan Ryan his Advil, would you? Troy Aikman his Met-RX? Popeye his spinach?” He continued to write about steroids on occasion between 2002 and 2004, all excoriating steroid users, never questioning his profession’s role in missing them for so long.

    • The Common Man/www.platoonadvantage.com - Jan 18, 2011 at 5:21 PM

      In no way does he implicate any Rangers players or hint to any possibility of steroid use at the Ballpark in Arlington except for Ken Caminiti, by which time Caminiti had already admitted his use as a Ranger.

  4. rcaljo - Jan 18, 2011 at 5:27 PM

    As someone who wants to take his kids to the hall at some point, it saddens me that a lot of players I grew up watching won’t be in there. I’ll have to tell my kids about all the great players that played before my time. Maybe the hall should leave an empty wing to remember all those that should have made it in if only the voters had thought more like fans.

  5. hardjudge - Jan 18, 2011 at 6:19 PM

    I guess all the drunks of the teens, 20’s, 30’s 40’s 50’s, 60’s, the amphetamine users of the 60’s 70’s 80’s are all clean & pure, so its ok for them to be in the hall. The Hall is about performance. Put an * on everybody who played in the steroid era and get on with it. At least publish the “LIST” so the 3 or 4 who have been outed won’t have to suffer alone. Baseball writers=HYPOCRITES.

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