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Josh Willingham, Curtis Granderson are bringing the charitable noise

May 5, 2011, 10:00 AM EDT

Willingham_Josh

After a day of dealing with Luke Scott and John Rocker it’s something of a palate-cleanser to talk about this stuff:

  • Alabama native and resident Josh Willingham has been pitching in big-time to help the victims of last week’s tornadoes. His wife is back home on the ground helping out. Meanwhile, he has been collecting donations from teammates to help with recovery. The Athletics have added an additional $10,000 and the MLBPA is going to match up to $15,000 of whatever is raised;
  • Meanwhile, Curtis Granderson has plopped down $50K to help supply bats to New York City public school baseball and softball teams. There is a serious need there, due to the fact that last year City Council banned metal and composite bats for safety purposes. Wood bats break and there isn’t enough money to go around to keep the teams supplied, so Granderson has stepped up.

While we’re singling out Willingham and Granderson here, it should be remembered that there are tons and tons of major leaguers doing this kind of stuff every day. Not all of this kind of work gets publicized like this, but there it is.  It’s helpful to remember that whenever we hear about whatever numbskullery rules the day.

  1. Matthew Flint - May 5, 2011 at 10:30 AM

    Shane Victorino just donated $1 Million to the Nicetown Boys and Girls Club in Philadelphia. He and his wife gave enough for a complete renovation of the entire building (which was more than needed). It is great to see the athletes that are grounded and understand how fortunate they are. Good for Willingham, Granderson and the Victorinos.

    • Matthew Flint - May 5, 2011 at 10:32 AM

      http://www.yardbarker.com/mlb/articles/victorinos_give_1m_to_philly_boys_girls_club/4678219

  2. yankeesfanlen - May 5, 2011 at 10:56 AM

    Wouldn’t it be nice if the Luke Scotts and John Rockers expended their efforts and words to say something nice about any worthwhile charity?For example, years from now, when Luke Scott goes to his grave (I’ll need to see an original death certificate, thank you) they can say he worked for a local kids center.

    • Old Gator - May 5, 2011 at 2:29 PM

      Not much chance of that. Being right-wing knuckledraggers – hell, they may even still have prehensile tails rolled up in their underwear – they believe in something called “personal responsibility,” meaning it’s always someone else’s fault.

    • aaronmoreno - May 5, 2011 at 2:44 PM

      Has anyone looked to see if they donate to charity?

      • b7p19 - May 5, 2011 at 4:32 PM

        In fairness to those knuckleheads, you are absolutely right. We don’t know what they do with their money. For all we(I) know they contribute to charities all over the place.

      • yankeesfanlen - May 5, 2011 at 5:13 PM

        Actually, I googled Luke Scott + charities and came up with nothing except that the O’s were charitable letting him play.

  3. aleskel - May 5, 2011 at 10:59 AM

    kudos to Curtis for opening up is wallet for such a good cause, but I can’t help but think that buying equipment for local teams is something MLB and the teams should be stepping up for. If they want to grow the game and get kids to play, especially inner-city kids, this is how you do it.

    • yankeesfanlen - May 5, 2011 at 11:03 AM

      A couple of years old, but for example

      http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/16/sports/baseball/16yankees.html

  4. cur68 - May 5, 2011 at 12:18 PM

    I needed to see this. Restores my faith in people in general and baseball players in particular. All the DUIs, stealing, arguing and dumbassery really gets to be a downer after a while. Its nice to see some of these millionaires have their priorities straight.

    • Old Gator - May 5, 2011 at 2:32 PM

      I met Josh Willingham a couple of times when he played for the Feesh. He was recovering from back issues – I don’t recall if he’d had surgery but he was stiff as a board and obviously wearing a back brace or truss under his civvies and wincing a little every time he had to lean over to take a baseball or notepad from a kid to sign. But he winced. And leaned. And winced. And leaned. And smiled through all of it. You remember that kind of thing, and so this particular episode comes as no surprise to me. Classy guy, classy move.

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