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Ever wonder how the Yankees would fare if they called Citi Field home?

Jul 2, 2011, 11:31 AM EDT

Citi Field AP

The answer? Not nearly as well, at least from a power perspective.

This isn’t shocking information, given that Yankee Stadium obviously caters to power, particularly to right field, while Citi Field is more pitcher-friendly, but the Wall Street Journal crunched the actual numbers.

With the help of HitTrackerOnline’s Greg Rybarczyk and the ESPN Stats and Information Group, they looked at every home run hit at the new Yankee Stadium by seven prominent members of the Yankees’ regular lineup, including Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, Derek Jeter, Curtis Granderson, Robinson Cano, Nick Swisher and Jorge Posada.

They found that of the 242 homers hit by the seven players at Yankee Stadium since its debut in 2009, only 120 (49.6%) would have cleared the fence at Citi Field, assuming average weather conditions. The player affected the most? Derek Jeter. Just four of his 20 homers would have left Citi Field. And none to the opposite field.

As for Alex Rodriguez, he would have lost 41 percent of his home runs if he played his home games at Citi Field. We saw this first-hand last night, as Rodriguez hit a mammoth shot to left-center field in the ninth inning that would have been a home run at just about any other ballpark. But thanks to the “Great Wall of Flushing,” he had to settle for an RBI double.

There has been some clamoring for the Mets to move the fences in, but I’m not entirely convinced that minor alterations would make that much of a difference. Rybarczyk said as much in a study he did last month. If cutting the left field fence in half would help some of the hitters psychologically (I’m talking to you, Jason Bay), I suppose I could see some advantage to that. However, I actually enjoy the fact that Citi Field and Yankee Stadium are so vastly different.

  1. yankeesfanlen - Jul 2, 2011 at 11:54 AM

    Indeed, ARod was robbed in the ninth last night. It’s not really an issue for the Yankees at three times a year but at this point it is very problematical for the Metropolitans.
    Part of the fun and challenge in baseball is the various park configurations. I think, a few years ago during the planning of Citifield the Wilpons were more interested in the Ebbet’s Field thing than the baseball playablility thing.

  2. dirtyharry1971 - Jul 2, 2011 at 11:56 AM

    thank god they dont play in citi DUMP, i dont even want to think about it

    • kiwicricket - Jul 2, 2011 at 11:48 PM

      Thanks for that valuable and interesting insight Harry

  3. gammagammahey - Jul 2, 2011 at 12:13 PM

    Really, the Mets just need to do a better job moving forward of fielding a team that takes advantage of their ballpark like the Yankees have done. Signing Bay was a doubly horrible move for that reason. A strong left-handed power hitter would also allow them to take advantage of the right-field porch. Ike Davis looked like he could be that guy this year before he went down.

  4. jimbo1949 - Jul 2, 2011 at 12:59 PM

    Smart baseball executives would realize they need more speedy, line drive hitters to take advantage of Citi. Of course we’re talking about the mutts management, which is exactly why they’re going to let Reyes go and keep Wright.

  5. paperlions - Jul 2, 2011 at 1:18 PM

    Just as much as their stadium helps their hitters, it provides extra challenges to their pitchers….too bad they didn’t bother to see how much the park has “hurt” their pitching….every team would be wise to cater their roster to their park…for the Yankees, that may mean heavier investment in pitching (as was smartly done by the Phillies in their homer-friendly park) and for the Mets that will mean heavier investment in offense (as mediocre pitchers can be successful in their home park, similar to the situation in San Diego.)

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