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Jeter sitting out All-Star Game due to “emotional exhaustion.” And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Jul 12, 2011, 8:30 AM EST

New York Yankees v Texas Rangers, Game 6 Getty Images

Since the sporting press descended on Phoenix yesterday morning there has been a lot of talk about Derek Jeter‘s absence from this year’s All-Star Game. Jeter was elected by fans, you see, so many — including some players and some reporters — think that he should be there regardless of whether he will play, rest his leg or whatever. There is a suggestion by some that Jeter is shirking his responsibilities as the game’s most visible ambassador.

It seems, however, that there is a reason other than having a better way to spend his time that is keeping Jeter back home. From Ken Rosenthal and Jon Paul Morosi of Fox:

Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter will not attend the All-Star Game due to “emotional and physical exhaustion” from his pursuit of 3,000 hits, according to two people with knowledge of his thinking.

My prediction: this will lead to a lot of people laying even more scorn on his decision to avoid the All-Star Game and a lot people saying “he should get over it.”  My position: those people should probably be quiet and leave Jeter alone.

Jeter has done more than his fair share of baseball diplomacy over the years. He has always said and done the right thing even though almost any other mortal human being with an ego would have cracked at least once by now. He has done fan service, media service, team service and sponsor service. He has just gone through a stretch where people were simultaneously questioning his skills because of his play and declaring his greatness because of hit 3,000, often within a minute or two of one another.

Jeter is smooth and composed, but he’s also human. After nearly 20 years in the spotlight, he’s entitled to three frickin’ days off, isn’t he? Why are people getting upset about this?  Why is Jeter catching flak here when there are dozens of other players who are sitting out too? “Emotional exhaustion” seems like a plenty good reason for me. At least for this man at this time. Indeed, he has earned the right by now to say he doesn’t want to go because there’s a good movie on tonight that he’s been wanting to see.

He’s Derek Jeter. I think he has sufficient goodwill in the bank to sit this one out without being killed for it.

  1. itsacurse - Jul 12, 2011 at 8:36 AM

    Not to mention all the people who griped about him being voted in in the first place, many of whom are likely among the chorus giving him grief for sitting it out.

    • paperlions - Jul 12, 2011 at 8:38 AM

      I am not among those people. IMO, the All-Star game is the fans game, and they should be able to vote in who it is they want to see play (or honor who it is they wish to honor by voting them onto the team).

    • savocabol1 - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:03 AM

      I don’t understand your position. You are saying that people who argue he shouldn’t be there shouldn’t be allowed to weigh their opinion on whether or not he should actually show up now that he was voted in?

      Two seperate arguments pal. Nice stretch though.

      • itsacurse - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:15 PM

        you’d think the people who didn’t think he should be there in the first place would at least live with the fact that his spot is ceded to someone they deem more deserving. unfortunately a lot of people derive more pleasure from getting mad about perceived injustices than getting what they wanted, even if it’s not in the manner they would have preferred.

  2. paperlions - Jul 12, 2011 at 8:37 AM

    People always rip players that bow out just because they want a few days off. If it is okay to rip Manny for doing it, it is okay to rip Jeter for doing it. Jeter isn’t being paid $17MM/year for his baseball skills. When was the last time people in Arizona got to see Jeter play? Will they again before he retires? The fans (not the owners) pay players salaries, if the fans want to see you play….you should play…..and as Derek F-ing Jeter, this is a bad example to be set.

    As a non-Yankee fan and Jeter agnostic, I wonder on what all of this good will Jeter has banked is based? Has he really gone above and beyond the call of his job as an ambassador (I really don’t know, or at least, haven’t recalled any events) or has he just been a good citizen and is considered an ambassador due to his lack of screw ups (commendable thought they are, that doesn’t make him any different from 95% of baseball players) and being the Yankee SS.

    • dodger88 - Jul 12, 2011 at 8:41 AM

      Bad comparison – Manny would take “time off” and miss games that count in the standings. Missing an exhibition is not the same, not even close.

      • paperlions - Jul 12, 2011 at 8:54 AM

        I am referring specifically to the fact that Manny would always skip the AS game (he skipped it about 7 years in a row) and be ripped for it each year….not to anything else Manny may have done during the season.

      • dodger88 - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:54 AM

        Manny played in the All Star Game in 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007 & 2008.

        http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/r/ramirma02.shtml

        http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/playerpost.php?p=ramirma02&ps=asg

    • woodenulykteneau - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:05 AM

      “The fans (not the owners) pay players[sic] salaries”

      Oh, that’s just precious. How adorable that such naivete still exists in the second decade of the 21st century.

      • paperlions - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:59 AM

        Uh huh. Where, exactly does the money the owners pass along to the players come from? The owner make money every year, and that money (along with everything that goes to players/expenses) comes from the fans or is caused to exist because of fans (e.g. advertising related income).

        Without the fans, there is no league, the owners don’t chip in anything….they just facilitate the exhibition and profit from it.

    • mlblogsdagodfather - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:43 AM

      @paperlions

      “People always rip players that bow out just because they want a few days off. If it is okay to rip Manny for doing it, it is okay to rip Jeter for doing it. Jeter isn’t being paid $17MM/year for his baseball skills.”

      It’s fine for players to bow out of the ASG if they don’t want to play. However, they should not receive their bonus either, and in Jeter’s case that’s $500,000.

      “When was the last time people in Arizona got to see Jeter play?”

      With technology the way it is most likely the last time he played.

      “Will they again before he retires?”

      Yeah

      “The fans (not the owners) pay players salaries”

      You could not be more wrong. The fans pay the owners to put out a product. The owners pay their employees to make the product. The owners are free to pay whomever they want how much they want. Much like EVERY other business.

      “As a non-Yankee fan and Jeter agnostic, I wonder on what all of this good will Jeter has banked is based? Has he really gone above and beyond the call of his job as an ambassador (I really don’t know, or at least, haven’t recalled any events) or has he just been a good citizen and is considered an ambassador due to his lack of screw ups (commendable thought they are, that doesn’t make him any different from 95% of baseball players) and being the Yankee SS.”

      He’s an ambassador for the simple reason that the Yankee fans made him one. I am not a fan of the Yankees or their fans or Jeter. However, I will give the fans mad respect for Jeter. If Jeter comes up through, say Kansas City, he’s a journeyman utility player by now. There is nothing remarkable about his talent. Aside, from being able to get a hit at the most important time.

      • jkay1818 - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:40 AM

        A journeyman utility player? dude, get off that crack. he isnt on roids where he popped 500 homers. He is the 4th fastest player ever to 3000 hits, i dont think thats journeyman status, that is hall of fame status, sorry. first of all i should disregard everything you said in your post because you said “mad respect” you sound like a corny 40 something sportscenter anchor. 3000 hits is 3000 hits, whether he is on KC or Pitt. Take a look at his career numbers, over 200 hits how many times? Cant really argue those stats. Im sure you dont have the same stance on ripken and when its all said and done, jeter would have played less games and will beat him in almost every category aside from homers. I think 3004 hits, and counting and the 4th fastest ever to do that when you consider the hundreds and hundreds of thousands who have ever stepped to the plate in the majors is pretty remarkable. 5 rings and being a great playoff performer is remarkable too. he showed some decline last yr, but the year before that was incredible. hes 37, give him a break..The #s he had in 09 when he won a ring and destoryed the ball in the ws isnt very journeyman like to me. sorry.

      • jkay1818 - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:03 PM

        and just to prove your journeyman status wrong, in 09, just a season and a half ago, batting lead off he had 18 homers, 66 rbis, 111 runs, 30 steals, a 334 BA and over 400 obp..thats more like mvp numbers than journeyman to me, esp batting lead off. even last yr, everyone rips him and how hes the most awful SS ever, he batted 270, a career low with 18 steals, 10 homers and 67 rbis..how many short stops put up those numbers last yr? not to mention he was batting lead off. how many lead off hitters put up those numbers last yr? esp at 36 yrs old…i wouldnt be shocked if he batted in the 280’s this yr

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:36 PM

        mostly agree with you mlbblogsgodfater but:

        “It’s fine for players to bow out of the ASG if they don’t want to play. However, they should not receive their bonus either, and in Jeter’s case that’s $500,000.”

        his bonus from the yanks is for being named to the all-star team, not playing in it. From the Yankees standpoint, I’m sure they would rather gladly give him the 500k and have him sit/rest for the season and (hopefully) a championship run.

        “He’s an ambassador for the simple reason that the Yankee fans made him one.I am not a fan of the Yankees or their fans or Jeter. However, I will give the fans mad respect for Jeter.”

        Contradictory. Fans like you who say “I’ll give the fans mad respect for Jeter,” along with MLB as a whole have made him an ambassador because not only is he the face of the most glorified baseball team (whether non-Yankee fans like it or not), but he’s played the game for 16.5 season the “right” way, clean from PEDs, and from any negative press.

        He’s upheld that role above and beyond.

        “If Jeter comes up through, say Kansas City, he’s a journeyman utility player by now. There is nothing remarkable about his talent. Aside, from being able to get a hit at the most important time.”

        Speaking of KC and ambassador, have you read Rick Sutcliffe’s memory of how Jeter came to an event for the Negro League Museum in KC? Maybe the “saving” the museum is exaggerated but, that’s still one of the many instances where Jeter has done more than what is expected for baseball. (How’d you guys like that segue!)

        Nice way to end it with a Jeter stab, but let’s stay away from the hypotheticals because the counter argument of hyptheticals make this a moot comparison, like:

        a) There are players from small market teams that have not/ would not be able to survive the NY media scrutiny. Jeter’s handled that with class throughout his career and have come through in the biggest spots. The pressure here is x100 than Kansas City so take that into account. Don’t think that matters? reference Randy Johnson, Kevin Brown, etc.

        b) Take Jeter’s numbers throughout his career and put that on the Royals. Even though he’s batted/batting .270 the last seaon and a half, for the Royals, he’d still be an everyday player…the only difference is he’d probably have hit 3rd in that friggin lineup all these years. If they have THAT much patience for Alex Gordon, then I think Jeter’s numbers are still good on that team even now at 37.

        c) and you never know, perhaps Jeter thrives in pressure and he mightve done worse over his career as Royal.

      • hystoracle - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:40 PM

        I think if your at the level of a Derek Jeter you should be expected to make the All Star Team. There should be no incentive. As a future HOF’er, Jeter plays for one of the most publicized, televised, and popular teams in THE largest market in America. He should not get an incentive to do something that is a given. When you are making 17mil per year you better be an ALL-Star. And that isn’t limited to just Jeter.

        As far as attending, if you don’t want to be there then take your name off the ballot. The fans vote you in because they want to see you play. To not show up after playing the entire weekend is BS. Sit the bench – play one out and take a seat, whatever. At least show up. Just shows a lack of respect for the fans – whether intentional or not.

  3. halladaysbiceps - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:10 AM

    Most of you know that I am a staunch opponent of fan balloting for the starters of the game because it’s a poularity contest. Many people that are for fan balloting state it’s the fan’s game, so the people have the right to put the players in the game that they want to see, regardless of whether the player is having the year to warrant an appearance.

    OK, with that logic, since Derek Jeter is not hurt, he has an obligation to the fans that voted him in to play the game. Citing emotional exhaustion is no excuse that people want to hear a 20+ million/year player make. Period. If Jeter is not physically hurt, he needs to play in the game. I just think it’s a bad decision.

    • vintage1496 - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:53 AM

      Derek may not be listed on an injury report, but he just came off the DL, is 37, usually gets a day off here and there anyway, and just went through as strenuous a time as any baseball player could. He’d only play three innings or whatever, but I think staying home and resting for three days will go a long way towards getting him healthy and performing his best for the remainder of the season.

      I think he’s doing what he’s been doing his entire career: putting the best interests of the team first.

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:03 AM

        OK. Fair enough. But, let me ask you this. Jeter recorded his 3,000 hit on Saturday. Then, he played the following day for the full game. If he was that emotionally exhausted as he claims, surely they would have rested him for Sunday’s game.

        Why did he not rest for Sunday’s game and played in tonight’s all-star game, getting a couple of bats? That would have given him (2) full days of rest off before the game.

      • vintage1496 - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:05 AM

        Great point, and the answer is that one of those games counts for the standings while the other does not. He’ll play in the former 99 times out of 100.

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:11 AM

        But, vintage1496, this game does count for something per Bud Selig as of 2003. Home field advantage in the WS. Because Jeter is part of a Yankees team that has a great chance of making it to the World Series, he could be a factor in the All-Star game with his bat or glove in the few innings he would have played.

      • vintage1496 - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:26 AM

        I can’t tell if you’re kidding or not, but I hope you are.

        Also, a World Series hasn’t gone to seven games in nine seasons, so maybe a game in the standings is worth more than the off-chance that two at-bats and three innings in the field would make a difference in the All-Star Game.

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:46 AM

        OK, vintage1496, I’ll make one last try at this one. And I wasn’t kidding in my prior comment.

        37 year old players such as Jeter are routinely given days off during the course of the season. Sundays are the typical day for this. So, with that said, and with all of the fan interest in the All-Star game (which is obvious with all the voting that has gone on and how MLB tries to promote the game to death), why not rest Jeter on Sunday and have him make an appearance at a game that fans wanted to see him play in? Why even have the fans vote for the players if non-injured players will not do them the courtesy of showing up?

        I guess logic does not apply to Derek Jeter. Seems like this guy is above reproach.

      • vintage1496 - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:15 AM

        Imagine that it’s Sunday and you’re in the same situation as Jeter, but in your current job. In the next four days you can either work today from your office (aka Jeter playing Sunday), then take off the next three days. Or you can take off today (aka Jeter taking off Sunday’s game), fly out to Arizona Monday, work half a day Tuesday, then fly home Wednesday and work the rest of the week. Which of those sounds more appealing, logically, to you?

        I’m not sure he’s beyond reproach – far from it, most believe he’s scrutinized more than any player in the game. It seems that Jeter is choosing what’s best for his team and his body over what fans want to see. After giving so much to the game in the last 17 years, most would agree he’s earned the right to sit out ONE game.

  4. heynerdlinger - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:12 AM

    The only thing that surprises me about this story is that no one has taken the “DerekJeter Has Too Much Respect for the Game to Play in the All-Star Game in Such a Diminished Capacity” angle.

  5. drunkenhooliganism - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:12 AM

    I don’t care that he’s missing the game. I don’t even care that he’s not attending. But the “emotional exhaustion” line is pathetic. There are a lot more emotionally exhausting things that having praised heaped upon you for three days straight.

    I know there’s some single mother raising her special needs child on a shoestring budget logging on to the internets right now thinking how cute it is that he’s emotionally exhausted.

    • Ari Collins - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:19 AM

      I think you’re underestimating how exhausting it must have been to have your every AB criticized more than the last. For 3 months. In the biggest media market in baseball.

      What’s more, the “Lots of other people have more emotional strain” point, while totally true, has nothing to do with whether the exhaustion that Jeter felt was enough to skip an exhibition game.

      • drunkenhooliganism - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:36 AM

        I don’t care that he skipped the game. And I’m sure that the last few weeks were exhausting for him.

        He’s one of the best representatives of the game, and he has been for years. He should have chosen his words better. That statement makes him look like he is so far removed from normal people who are just trying to pay their rent and their stress that he’s ignorant to working class struggles. I always thought part of his act was that he was from working class middle america.

    • mgp1219 - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:31 PM

      I agree and I am a huge Jeter fan. Emotionally exhausted?? Come on Jeter, you can come up with a better excuse than that. It’s more like he just doesn’t feel like playing in a stupid, meaningless game that is nothing more than a popularity contest determined by the fans.

    • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:55 PM

      there is probably a single mother raising her special needs child on a shoestring budget who probably would take a personal day or a sick-day from her job because of the mental breakdown/burnout.

      Do we call this mother negligent? No, we call her human. Just a natural thing that happens to the human mind. We all get burnt out from giving our all (hopefully) to our jobs.

      Jeter makes millions and much more than we (normal folk) can ever imagine, but gotdamn, he’s still a human. He dedicates so much time to his job.

      Do we criticize the doctor or dentist who also make tons of money for going away on vacation with his family while he still has patients or possible new ones?

      What makes Jeter any different?

      • 24missed - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:40 PM

        Jeter is very different. People just trying to make it through life these days with so many curve balls (pun intended) thrown their way, people show up and do what they can.

        The doctors/dentists are entitled to a vacation. Ballplayers call it offseason. Ballblayers train during most of those months, but I’ll bet that some enjoy a week or two with their families. I have a doctor who actually phones in during his vacation and spends time working with other doctors and patients to help them, in case of emergency or maintenance. And this dr. doesn’t make a ton of money. Do any of them compared to baseball players?

        I certainly don’t begrudge the guys playing ball earning their bucks. Good for them. And tons of them do great charity work that make this world a better place.

        But, Jeter is different. He was voted in. People wanted to see him play ~ whether a lot of people thought it was a joke or not. A lot of people obviously wanted to see him play or he wouldn’t have been voted into the game. Girardi always says that he wants to rest his older players. This isn’t resting. This is not even showing up and supporting the rest of the team, let alone playing.

        Jeter is not alone in sitting out the game after being voted in, but that’s another article.

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:54 PM

        ” The doctors/dentists are entitled to a vacation. Ballplayers call it offseason”

        So baseball players need to wait for the offseason to be entitled to a vacation? in the 9 months of baseball, they cannot take a day off unless the manager feels like he needs a day off?

        but, perhaps a better comparison is the following:

        When Doctors/Dentists get invited to a Doctor/dentist conference, lets call it the “All Star Surgeons Conference”, and they decline because they rather either spend time on their patients, use the time for family, or use the time for anything else (although i’m sure all the doctors who wanted this one to come are disappointed). Should there be an obligation to go?

        Allen Iverson: “C’mon man, we ain’t even talking about a real game, a game I give 110% for day in and day out, but practice. Practice??? man what is we talking about? Practice? Practice? (x100)”

  6. drewmunny - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:44 AM

    Seems to be an overwhelming sense of entitlement in the comments section today. “I voted Jeter in, I’m a fan, he has a responsibility to play.” And to compare his emotional exhaustion to that if a single mother with a special-needs child? Interesting. Exhaustion, emotional or otherwise, does not discriminate based on age, wealth, social strata, or other. Me? I’m just a lowly industrial mechanic ,but I’m one who happens to average 70+ hour weeks, so I can certainly empathize with being exhausted. It’s a feeling of being burnt out, weak. And Derek Jeter has the right to feel this way, particularly in light of the scrutiny he’s been under. He clearly gets a pass. And to hell with the past, goodwill, any of that, he has many legitimate reasons to sit out, this not being the least of them.

  7. yankeesfanlen - Jul 12, 2011 at 9:52 AM

    If “El Bravo” can say GO PHILLIES, I might as well say:

    Leave Jeter Alone.

    • Utley's Hair - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:59 PM

      Len, that was a half-hearted attempt if ever I’ve seen one. Or would half-a$$ed be more appropriate?

      • yankeesfanlen - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:07 PM

        My stars and garters, you cut me to the quick!.
        (leave jeter alone)

  8. savocabol1 - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:01 AM

    I get it, fans vote for their players and NY has a million people that vote for yankees. BUT Jeter should never have been voted in. No argument can be made for him to be there if you look at his stats.

    • ditto65 - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:04 PM

      Unless you admit that, since it is a fan vote determination, it is a popularity contest. Than it is fine that Jeter is in.

      Jeter is popular, All-Star Game is a popularity contest, Jeter is an All-Star.

      It is just that simple.

  9. hgulkkcaj - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:47 AM

    There isn’t a team in sports I can stand less than the Yankees, but I have more respect for Derek Jeter than any other athlete I’ve ever seen. This guy has done everything the right way and baseball will not be the same when he decides to hang ‘em up. It is a bummer that we won’t see him out on the field tonight in what could have been his last All-Star Game, but I don’t think taking the day off is too much to ask for a guy like this. Besides, it will give us a chance to watch some of the young superstars play that people don’t get to see much of (see: Asdrubal Cabrera).

  10. mrfloydpink - Jul 12, 2011 at 10:49 AM

    “He has always said and done the right thing”

    Really? Like, moving to 3B when the Yankees acquired a vastly superior defensive shortstop? Like, taking a contract that was commensurate with his skills rather than holding out for every last dollar? Like, stepping up for a teammate when A-Rod was being raked over the coals for steroids?

    When Derek Jeter does anything, he is concerned with one issue: What is best for Derek Jeter. Quite often, what is best for Derek Jeter is also what is best for the Yankees (producing offense, winning World Series) or what is best for baseball (being diplomatic). But I defy you to give an example where Derek Jeter has placed his own needs/agenda/image second and the needs of the team (or of baseball) first, when those two things were in conflict.

    • hgulkkcaj - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:17 PM

      Is sitting out the all-star game good for Jeter’s own image? No.

      Is sitting out the all-star game good for Jeter’s team? Yes.

      Done.

      • mrfloydpink - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:03 PM

        Really? You see no benefit to Derek Jeter in getting three days off to have fun and do whatever he wants? You think he has NO interest in a vacation, and really would desperately like to attend the game, if only his duties to the Yankees didn’t make it impossible? If that’s true, why not hop on the Yankees’ jet, attend the game, and then just not play. His “image” would be fine, and the Yankees needs would be addressed.

    • mgp1219 - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:41 PM

      1) Jeter probably realized that A-fraud would be a better third baseman than he would be.

      2) Jeter never held out. And name one player who doesn’t want to get every last dollar he can.

      3) A-fraud dissed Jeter more than once and nobody likes A-fraud anyway.

      I guess diving into the stands @ Fenway Park, head first, is putting himself ahead of his team or of baseball.

      Ever heard of the Turn 2 Foundation? Look it up….

      • yankeesfanlen - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:51 PM

        Leave ARod Alone!!!

      • mrfloydpink - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:09 PM

        1. Do you REALLY believe that Jeter wanted to move to 3B, was willing to move to 3B, and chose not to do so because he knew in his heart that his defense would hurt the team there more than it does at shortstop? Please.

        2. Do you understand what a holdout is? They exist in football, but not really in baseball, excepting perhaps draftees. So it’s true that Jeter never held out. But he did make a spectacle of his latest contract negotiation.

        3. Jeter is the captain (and “The Captain”). A leader should be able to put personal issues aside for the good of the team.

        As to the diving into the stands play, seriously? Why do people assign so much value to that one play? A play, I might add, that I’ve seen dozens of times from many ballplayers. The only person who’s gotten more mileage out of a single play, I think, is Gary Matthews, Jr.

        Oh, and charity work is great, and very respectable. But don’t think there aren’t athletes who do charity work simply because it’s good for their image. is Derek Jeter one of those? I don’t know one way or another.

      • mgp1219 - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:39 PM

        mrfloydpink,

        I do believe that Jeter did not want to move to 3rd base, but he would have if he felt that he wouldn’t hurt the team in doing so. A-fraud is younger, stronger and bigger than Jeter and it made sense to move him there, in this case. He had fielding issues initially, but his defensive play has improved dramatically since then. He is a better athelte than Jeter.

        As for holding out, yes I know what it means, you should choose your words more carefully.

        Yes, Jeter is the Captain, based on his commitment to the team, not to A-fraud.

        Finally, my point about him didving into the stands was that any player who puts himself before the team would never have taken the chance on getting seriously injured by doing what Jeter did (and he made the catch). He also made a similar play @ Fenway where he flipped into the stands after making a catch on a foul pop-up.

      • cktai - Jul 13, 2011 at 4:44 AM

        “Jeter probably realized that A-fraud would be a better third baseman than he would be.”

        “A-fraud is younger, stronger and bigger than Jeter and it made sense to move him there, in this case. He had fielding issues initially, but his defensive play has improved dramatically since then. He is a better athelte than Jeter.”

        This is probably true, he would also realise how vastly superior ARod was as a shortstop. The fact that ARod is a better allround athelete then Jeter makes it even more sensible to keep him at short and move Jeter to third.

        Think about the skill sets of these players. Jeter can make a play on any ball hit straight at him, he has good reflexes and a good throw; skills that all translate very well to third base. The main thing that Jeter lacks in the field compared to ARod is range, and it so happens to be that range is far more important on short then it is on third. Anyone with any baseball sense looking objectively at the matter would have moved Jeter to third rather then ARod. However Jeters pride had to be saved at the cost of the team.

    • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 4:38 PM

      give me an example where has placed his own needs/agenda/image second and the needs of the team (or of baseball) first, when those two things were in conflict.

      Because mgp1219 gave you a great example and you shot that down pretty quickly.

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 4:39 PM

        *give me an example of any baseball player

      • cktai - Jul 13, 2011 at 4:52 AM

        Gil Meche

      • youngyankee - Jul 13, 2011 at 6:22 PM

        @cktai

        Gil Meche. great example but if you want to get down to semantics, I disagree with using him as an example. a) the dude was retiring and b) his needs and the team needs were not in conflict in this situation – he was retiring.

        He didn’t feel right “rehabbing” and sitting on the bench and making 12 mil when he was being paid 12 mil to pitch.

        He didn’t say “i’m leaving 12mil on the table so that KC can use that to get the talent we need to start winning”

        There was no reason for Jeter to say “I’ll come back for far less to acquire talent so we can win” because its the Yankees.

        Jeter was crucified for negotiating, something all free agents do. The Yanks, after paying MILLIONS of extra dollars to players whose actual baseball value was worth far less, took this hardnose “only pay for baseball skill” approach to the face of their franchise and their most valuable player in terms of marketability. This after going back on their word and re-signing A-Rod to an even worse contract than the original 10 yr deal.

        It was a b*tch move by Hal/Hank.

  11. frobaggins - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:10 AM

    who cares if he sits out. but “emotional exhaustion” from chasing 3,000 hits? cool bro. i for one could care less he is “emotionally exhausted” from chasing a personal milestone and record. so the only reason he’s been busting his ass the last week wasn’t for the team, its been to get to 3000 hits finally? and people are suppose to care he’s tired from that? he wants to rest his recently injured calf, totally understandable, but why would fans care that your tired from chasing records halfway through the season. i guess people should expect jeter not be playing as hard the rest of the season since all he’s been doing is going all out to achieve a personal success.

    • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:07 PM

      “so the only reason he’s been busting his ass the last week wasn’t for the team, its been to get to 3000 hits finally?”

      would you agree that the quicker he got the 3k out the way, the quicker the yankees could get back to baseball instead of all the DJ3K hoopla?

      He’s physically not a 100 percent. He’s mentally drained from all the media attention and pressure to break this milestone not only for himself but for Yankees, and Baseball.

      As Yogi Berra best said “the games 90% mental, the other half physical”

      • yankeesfanlen - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:19 PM

        young yankee- Appreciate your contribution and welcome aboard, but don’t misquote Yogi:

        “90% of the game is half mental”

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:32 PM

        thanks for the welcome!

        Thought i got that right, but forgive me for that slip

      • Utley's Hair - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:50 PM

        Len is pretty good to newbies—especially Yanker fans for some godforsaken reason. But he will throw pie at you if you misquote Yogi again.

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:58 PM

        through a pie at all the Yogi Berra quote sites that quoted the way i did, Len!

      • yankeesfanlen - Jul 12, 2011 at 2:12 PM

        Actually, this one gets mixed up most of the time, including google searches. It comes from Allan Barra’s book “Yogi Berra:Eternal Yankee”, the best biography of Yogi that I’ve read.
        I don’t get close enough to pies to throw them.

      • frobaggins - Jul 12, 2011 at 3:26 PM

        sorry to breakup this yankee party

        fair point..if he was chasing an actual record. it wasn’t like he was chasing the homerun record, hit streak, consecutive games played…he was chasing a certain number of hits. on saturday, he had around another 80 games to pick up ONE HIT. how can that be mentally exhausting? he’s been one of the better hitters in the league the last 10 years, it should have been an afterthought that he would reach 3,000. if it was the last week of the season or he was retiring after, then obviously there would be pressure. but i’m suppose to understand this guy being “emotionally exhausted” from essentially doing what he’s done the last 15 seasons? give me a break!

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 4:15 PM

        @frobaggins

        Applying your logic to climbing Mt. Everest: If I started climbing it, it isn’t mentally draining along the way, only when you’re 1 step from the apex?

        Yes, I suppose Jeter reaching 3k was a matter of time not a matter of if, but if you’re reaching a any milestone very few have ever reached, it HAS to be taxing on your body and mind considering you receive so much (un)wanted stories, reports, ppl always asking you about it, etc. And also the fact that he definitely wanted to do it at Yankee Stadium.

        A-Rod chasing 600, he had 46 at bats in btwn 599 and 600. Don’t think he was pressing? Mentally drained during/after?

        Jeter’s not emotionally exhausted from doing what he’s been doing for 16+ seasons, he drained from all the extra BS that surrounds the road to 3k.

  12. zachcomtois - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:11 AM

    I don’t mind that he bowed out. Asdrubal should be the starting shortstop anyway. I’d rather see him play.

  13. dhbrownsports - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:15 AM

    This article is garbage. Quit babying these athletes. There’s a reason nobody’s ever heard of this Craig guy. What a joke of an article. Whether he should be there or not because of his numbers would’ve been a better argument. Not that he’s exhausted when he hasn’t played as much as anybody else. What a joke. Sweet article dude, hope Jeter takes you out to dinner or something.

    • bjavie - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:12 PM

      Whoa, dude. Don’t attack Craig. How many people have heard of YOU? The purpose of these NBC Sport “Talk” sites is to provide info that people might not otherwise seek out. Example, I don’t read the Plain-Dealer and would never go to that website. Luckily, if there is something that baseball fans might find interesting, it is referenced here. What makes it different than traditional reporting is the format – which includes the posters personal opinion of the subject.

      I for one love the format, I don’t care about Jeter, but I find the overall reaction to these things to be very interesting.

      If you were looking for an expose on the subject you came to the wrong place.

    • Utley's Hair - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:47 PM

      Good job, man. By your jagoff comment, you got me to click on your handle to find out if you had an actual blog. Apparently you do, but apparently nobody reads it—or at least comments on it. Now, if you don’t like this one, feel free to go somewhere else.

      Craig is pretty well known around here, ya know, on his blog, which just so happens to be on the NBC Sports webpage, which is pretty well known itself. There are upwards of 60 or 70—I’m guessing—regular commenters on here, and countless other sporadic commenters, as well.

      By the way, if you bothered to look around prior to getting your panties in a bunch over this “garbage” article, you’d have found God only knows how many HBT posts on Jeter and his quest for his 3000th hit. So ya might want to look around before making dipsh!t comments, Dave.

  14. jkay1818 - Jul 12, 2011 at 11:42 AM

    people are missing a huge point here. this article never once said jeter said “im sitting out because im exhausted” people are citing and assuming that…hes 37, he just got off the DL, give me a break.

  15. churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:09 PM

    this will lead to a lot of people laying even more scorn on his decision to avoid the All-Star Game and a lot people saying “he should get over it.

    The worst part was hearing Kruk meander on about how if people are voted in they should be there. Oh really Kruk, the player who took himself out a game and retired on the spot? He has a lot of balls* doing something like that and having this viewpoint.

    *(teehee)

  16. londonvince - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:11 PM

    Jeter is in a no-win situation. The comment that she should have missed Sunday’s game in order to play on Tuesday is silly and fails to take into account that a huge number of people bought tickets for Sunday’s game to see him play with the possibility that they might see him hit Number 3000. If he had sat that out there would have been complaints, this time from his own fans (those that can actually claim to ‘pay’ his wages).

  17. jerseydevi1 - Jul 12, 2011 at 12:17 PM

    I say let him take the day, and I don’t care what the reason is.

    As a Yankee fan, I want them all to take the time off. I’ll admit I’m being selfish. Jeter is 37. I want him as healthy as possible late in the season and hopefully playoffs.

    While it was fun watching Robbie and his Dad beat out Adrian Gonzales last night, I selfishly wish he hadn’t. I would rather see him take some rest.

    That being said, if you are elected to the game by the fans, you should probably at least show your face, even if you don’t play.

  18. mgp1219 - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:06 PM

    All all star games are a joke. What gets me is that when analysts and reporters are talking about a professional athelete, they so often include how many times he has been (or was) an all star. Who cares how many times he was popular enough to be voted in by the lemming-fans that actually vote? They make it sound as if being an all star means he is, or must have been, a great player.

    All star games are just another money maker for the owners and the league paid for by the fans who are duped into believing that the games actually mean something.

  19. needadad - Jul 12, 2011 at 1:42 PM

    Instead of flying to and from Arizona he’d rather spend 3 days putting it to Minka…ok is everyone happy now

  20. ricofoy - Jul 12, 2011 at 2:01 PM

    Maybe Jeter forgot when the All-Star game was. After all, that was the reason he gave for not attending the great Bob Sheppard’s funeral last year. Let’s face it, Jeter does what’s best for Jeter. He’s very selfish but that trait is well hidden under the guise of only caring about the team. Naturally the media eats it up and fawns all over the guy.

    • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 4:19 PM

      “Let’s face it, Jeter does what’s best for Jeter.”

      dude, everyone does what’s best for them. it’s called life.

      • ricofoy - Jul 12, 2011 at 6:10 PM

        junior, you need to learn about life. Now go clean your room.

      • youngyankee - Jul 12, 2011 at 6:22 PM

        senior, you need to learn that doing what’s best for you doesn’t make you selfish. Now go clean your eyes.

        Question: What was your opinion on Christian Lopez giving the ball back to Jeter for nothing?

  21. spudchukar - Jul 12, 2011 at 3:11 PM

    Sure Jeter is entitled to sit this one out. Probably would have been more prudent if he chose to use his recent injury over “emotional exhaustion”, but maybe that answer is actually more honest. The one problem I have with the decision goes like this. All week long, that is A.D., after Derek’s canonization, I listened to the Mt. Rushmore garbage, and his place in Yankee lore. Somehow I find it hard to imagine Lou Gehrig sitting out an All-Star game due to “emotional exhaustion”.

  22. rcali - Jul 12, 2011 at 3:55 PM

    I’m visionally exhausted from watching him ground into double plays. Two more years on that contract!

  23. 3kittymama - Jul 18, 2011 at 1:16 PM

    Derek Jeter is a big wuss, pure and simple. Cal Ripken, Jr. set a record that no one will ever come close to equaling, and he played the very next day, and every one after that for some 500+ games. “Emotional exaustion”? Puh-LEEZE. Only a little girl would use that lame excuse for thumbing his nose at all the people who took the time to vote for him to play in the All Star Game.

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