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Details emerge in Bryan Stow case arrests; Stow gives a thumbs up to family

Jul 22, 2011, 5:05 PM EDT

Giants Fan Attacked AP

Some details are emerging in connection with the arrests in the Bryan Stow case. Specifically, an anonymous law enforcement official is saying that the two men who were arrested yesterday made incriminating statements that implicated them in the attack. There was not, however, any forensic evidence against the men, so this could all be based on their confessions — if, indeed, these are confessions — and circumstantial evidence.

Charges are expected to be filed Monday.  Which is awesome, but let us remember that the LAPD was confident that the last suspect — Giovanni Ramirez — was their man, and that turned out to be wrong.  Even if they don’t waver on these two new suspects, you have to figure any decent defense lawyer would make much of the LAPD’s early uncertainty, thus making convictions far short of a sure thing.

In other news, this is interesting:

The family of the San Francisco Giants fan severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium says the hospitalized father of two appeared to mouth his last name and might have tried to give a thumbs-up.

Thin stuff to be sure, but if it’s something that gives the family hope, it’s good enough for me.  Here’s hoping that good news continues to roll in.

  1. koufaxmitzvah - Jul 22, 2011 at 5:43 PM

    Big Thumbs Up to Bryan.

    In terms of Ramirez, the guy is a parolee, has a history of being on the street, and it could be that for whatever reason, cracking him was the key to getting these two. I’m no fan of LAPD (they tend to shoot people when they don’t have to), but if these ARE the guys, then I’m not going to fault them in how they were caught.

    Good vibes, people. This case needs to be solved.

    • clydeserra - Jul 22, 2011 at 6:01 PM

      I agree that it is great news on Bryan Stow.

      Your speculation on Ramirez is completely unfounded. I am certain he had no hand assisting LAPD in this, I think his lawyer has made that pretty clear.

      • Utley's Hair - Jul 22, 2011 at 6:35 PM

        How is it unfounded? He’s been convicted before. His criminal history tells what kind of guy he is. As it says, he is being held on a parole violation, meaning he was convicted before. Did you ever think that maybe the LAPD used his arrest to try to get the real culprits to slip up? Yeah, hopefully these guys are the slugs that did it. But apparently Ramirez is no saint.

      • clydeserra - Jul 22, 2011 at 6:42 PM

        Because asking him about it would result in in inadmissible evidence and would totally torpedo any case.

        This is not “The CLoser,” LAPD, what ever you think about them try to follow the law when investigating cases.

      • koufaxmitzvah - Jul 23, 2011 at 12:08 PM

        You know what’s great about your perspective of Ramirez is that it holds absolutely no bearing on the case.

        My points about Ramirez was to provide positive vibes that the latest arrests are the proper ones.

        And seeing as how neither you nor me are members of the LAPD investigation team, we can only speculate as to why this case has gone the way it has.

        But, hey, just keep arguing for no reason and continue telling the rest of the world that our heads are buried in the sand. Because you most definitely are the clearest thinking individual I’ve read on this here blog.

        I hope that makes you feel better.

    • mplsjoe - Jul 22, 2011 at 10:45 PM

      So the LAPD should falsely arrest someone just to convince the real suspects to let their guard down. Scary world. I’ll bet you hope you’re never the dude falsely arrested.

      • koufaxmitzvah - Jul 23, 2011 at 12:09 PM

        If it really matters, maybe you should just read the comment again.

      • mplsjoe - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:57 PM

        OK, I read both comments again. Yours was:

        “In terms of Ramirez, the guy is a parolee, has a history of being on the street, and it could be that for whatever reason, cracking him was the key to getting these two. I’m no fan of LAPD (they tend to shoot people when they don’t have to), but if these ARE the guys, then I’m not going to fault them in how they were caught.”

        You’re vague, which give you some after-the-fact wiggle room. But you seem to be arguing that arresting an innocent guy (you know, innocent, like, he didn’t beat up Brian Stow) was “the key to getting these two,” because the innocent guy might have “crack[ed].” I assume you mean that the innocent guy, in order to convince the cops that he was in fact innocent, gave up the next two guys arrested. Which is all fine – unless you’re the innocent guy. In which case you got arrested and dragged through the press for something you didn’t do, which is a shame. Again, I bet you hope you’re never that guy.

        Utley’s Hair took the conspiracy theory one step further when he said, “Did you ever think that maybe the LAPD used his arrest to try to get the real culprits to slip up?” So his theory is that the cops arrested an innocent guy on purpose to try and convince the real bad guys to let their guard down, and it might have worked. Hey, great if you’re the LAPD! Not so great if you’re the innocent guy.

        And to answer your question – yes, it does “really matter[]” when innocent people get arrested. What doesn’t matter is if there’s some “greater good” behind the arrest of an innocent person.

  2. SmackSaw - Jul 22, 2011 at 5:44 PM

    The LAPD will find a way to screw the case up.

    Get better Stow.

  3. clydeserra - Jul 22, 2011 at 5:58 PM

    That is great news. Thumbs up.

  4. Utley's Hair - Jul 22, 2011 at 6:30 PM

    Good for the Stows. Here’s hoping his recovery continues.

  5. crispybasil - Jul 23, 2011 at 1:03 AM

    Definitely good news.

    If there was more conclusive evidence, I’d want the charges to be two counts of attempted murder.

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