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Alomar, Gillick, Blyleven inducted into the Hall of Fame

Jul 25, 2011, 8:50 AM EDT

2011 Baseball Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Getty Images

I keep telling myself that one of these years I’m going to go to Cooperstown for the Hall of Fame inductions, but I just never get around to it. Maybe when Maddux goes in I will. I don’t know.

For the time being, we have the story about yesterday’s inductions of Roberto Alomar, Bert Blyleven and Pat Gillick.  You can read the entirety of each of their speeches here, here and here.

Gillick’s was characterized by a graciousness for what the game has given him.  Alomar’s, a humility at the honor and a love and respect for the Blue Jays organization and the fans of Toronto in general. Blyleven covered personal history and, as expected, gave it a light touch with moments of humor. There was no “ich bin ein Berliner” moments, but you tend not to get those in this setting. They were all nice speeches.

  1. yankeesfanlen - Jul 25, 2011 at 8:56 AM

    None of them are doughnuts? Guess we have to wait for David Wells to egt in.

  2. Old Gator - Jul 25, 2011 at 9:20 AM

    Congratulations to Bert Blyleven on his successful crusade of hectoring his way into the hall. He sounds like a nice enough guy, but really, all those years of articles that were thinly disguised (when he bothered to disguise them at all) campaigning for his own induction had gotten to be a bit much.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 9:24 AM

      Yes, it’s Rich Lederer is actually an anagram of Bert Blyleven. Look it up, I know you won’t.

      Sarcasm aside, is it really as bad as what the Globe did for Jim Rice?

    • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 9:54 AM

      I have to agree with you, Gator. Bert Blyleven’s whining over the years wore thin with a lot of people, including myself. There’s a reason it took 15 years, Bert. It’s because you had borderline numbers at best. Even after the guy was elected, he still was whining about why it took so long. Unbelievable.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:19 AM

        It’s because you had borderline numbers at best

        Linking this again*. Do you think Jack Morris is a HoFer? Do you think Mariano Rivera is a HoFer? What if you combined both of them into one super-mega-awesome pitcher? You’d get someone with worst stats than Blyleven.

        http://www.platoonadvantage.com/2010/12/blyleven-vs-morris.html

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:32 AM

        Bert Blyleven: 287 Wins, 250 Losses – Horrible win/loss ratio. Career ERA of 3.31 is pretty good.

        One 20 game winning season in 22 years. Not a Hall of Famer to me.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:42 AM

        Why should we judge his pitching based off a context dependent stat like wins/losses? He threw 60 shutouts. He’s 5th all time in K’s. If he pitches a CG giving up 1 run and loses because his offense stinks, that’s Blyleven’s fault?

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:47 AM

        I’ll try to illustrate my point a little better. Look up the career stats of Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer, Nolan Ryan and Steve Carlton and compare them to Bert Blyleven’s and get back to me. When electing Hall of Famers, you have to compare someone to their peers of that era. Blyleven was nowhere near as good as the 4 Hall of Famers that I metioned. It’s not even close.

        It’s not like Bert pitched for some aweful teams during his career. A record of 285-250 should tell you something. He couldn’t win games for his team when it counted. Seaver, Palmer, Ryan and Carlton could.

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:00 AM

        Here’s what a Hall of Famer’s stat line looks like, and this man only pitched for 12 years due to arm problems. Who was he?

        12 years, 165-87, 2.76 ERA, 2396 Ks, three 20 game win seasons, 3 Cy Young’s.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:05 AM

        I’ll try to illustrate my point a little better. Look up the career stats of Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer, Nolan Ryan and Steve Carlton and compare them to Bert Blyleven’s and get back to me

        Will do!

        Ryan – .526 win percentage, 112 ERA+
        Blyleven – .534 win percentage, 118 ERA+

        Carlton – 7.1 K/9, 3.2 BB/9, 2.26 K/BB
        Seaver – 6.8 K/9, 2.6 BB/9, 2.62 K/BB
        Palmer – 5.0 K/9, 3.0 BB/9, 1.69 K/BB
        Blyleven – 6.7 K/9, 2.4 BB/9, 2.80 K/BB

        Taking out wins, he looks to fit right in with everyone else.

      • yankeesfanlen - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:08 AM

        HB- Without looking it up, sounds to me like Whitey Ford, but I bet it’s a Phillie.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:11 AM

        it’s Sandy Koufax, and picking one of the best lefties of all time as the measuring stick pretty much eliminates 90% of the talent in the game.

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:11 AM

        Len,

        Sandy Koufax. If you haven’t before, look up his stats. Here’s the link. Unbelievable how dominate he was. They called him “The Left Arm of God.”

        Here’s his stats:

        http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/k/koufasa01.shtml

      • halladaysbiceps - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:30 AM

        Church,

        You’re right. Now, looking at the stats you provided, not only do I believe that Blyleven is in the same discussion as Ryan, Seaver, Carlton and Palmer, I actually think that Blyleven was a better pitcher than them. I see your point now that games won by a pitcher is meaningless. Wins/losses mean absolutely nothing.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 25, 2011 at 11:42 AM

        Flattery will get you everywhere sir!

        It’s not that wins/losses mean zero*, it’s just context dependent. Another case is Ryan Howard and R(s)BI. You should give Howard credit for knocking them in, but he shouldn’t get 100% of the credit b/c the guys before him had to get on base.

        *for wins/losses, I think you can give some credence to career wins/losses, but single season has too much outside interference, let alone SSS, to judge a person’s ability.

      • cktai - Jul 25, 2011 at 5:53 PM

        “Here’s what a Hall of Famer’s stat line looks like, and this man only pitched for 12 years due to arm problems. Who was he?

        12 years, 165-87, 2.76 ERA, 2396 Ks, three 20 game win seasons, 3 Cy Young’s.”

        How about

        12 years, 190-149, 2.82 ERA, 2389 Ks, 53 Shutouts (Koufax had 40), 805 BBs (Koufax had 817), 189 CGs (Koufax had 137).

        Bert Blijleven in his prime was on the same level as Sandy Koufax’ career. The difference is that Blijleven was more durable, thanks to the advice his dad got from Koufax.

  3. jwbiii - Jul 25, 2011 at 9:44 AM

    Blyleven and Lederer have been photographed together.

  4. hittfamily - Jul 25, 2011 at 9:45 AM

    Open the hall up to more players. They induct 10 dead guys every year. Why wait til Dale and Crime Dog are dead before electing them. 234 players are in the hof, or about 20 per decade. There is no way those guys aren’t top 20 players of their decade.

    • thefalcon123 - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:03 AM

      Come on man! The hall of fame is a sacred institution that can only include the most elite players from the steroid era and only every single player to play in a game from 1928-1935. Seriously guys…Lloyd Waner?!?

  5. girardisbraces - Jul 25, 2011 at 10:26 AM

    Craig, have you ever been to Cooperstown? I live just outside of Utica, a pleasant drive of about an hour or so. Sadly, I have not been back there since they canceled the Hall of Fame game and I refuse to watch a game played by washed up had beens. It used to be a yearly pilgrimage for my father and me. But the only induction I really remember was Phil Rizzuto’s. When you watch how the honor of being elected humbles most of these men, you wonder how some of today’s players can disrespect the game so much.
    I need to take my son to the HOF soon…. He’s almost 12 and it seems a prime opportunity for a father/son bonding moment.

  6. bkunza - Jul 25, 2011 at 1:10 PM

    “It’s not like Bert pitched for some aweful teams during his career. A record of 285-250 should tell you something. He couldn’t win games for his team when it counted. Seaver, Palmer, Ryan and Carlton could.”

    Bert won two world series titles, one with Pittsburgh the other with the Twins! I think those counted!

    • cktai - Jul 25, 2011 at 6:05 PM

      He was a choker examplefied by that one play-off game he lost. His post season record is a miserable 5-1 with a pedestrian 2.47 ERA.

      • bkunza - Jul 26, 2011 at 12:49 PM

        A miserable 5-1 2.47 ERA??????

      • cktai - Jul 27, 2011 at 3:15 AM

        Next time I’ll get some big neon signs saying “Warning, this comment may or may not contain sarcasm”

  7. dirtyharry1971 - Jul 25, 2011 at 2:23 PM

    Gillick shouldnt be in the HOF, the HOF should be for players only not pencil pushers behind a desk like Pat

    • Ari Collins - Jul 26, 2011 at 1:02 AM

      Do you ever say anything that’s not an insult?

    • derpdederpdederp - Jul 26, 2011 at 1:05 AM

      because spending your life in baseball and building WS champs from scratch counts for nothing. fucking troll

  8. derpdederpdederp - Jul 26, 2011 at 1:21 AM

    its literally Disney World for baseball fans. being there during induction weekend is just awesome

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