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Angels sign Jered Weaver to five-year, $85 million extension

Aug 21, 2011, 8:59 PM EST

Jered Weaver AP

The Angels have called a Tuesday press conference to announce the signing of ace Jered Weaver to a five-year, $85 million contract extension.

SI.com’s Jon Heyman had the dollar amount.  Yahoo! Sports’ Tim Brown reports that the deal contains a full no-trade clause.

Weaver is making $7.37 million this year after losing in arbitration back in February.  He had one year of arbitration left, so the new deal, which averages $17 million per season, buys out four years of free agency.

The deal matches up nicely with the similar pacts Felix Hernandez and Justin Verlander signed prior to the 2010 season.  Both were two years away from free agency then.  Hernandez signed for $78 million over five years, while Verlander got $80 million for five years.  Weaver receives a little more in part because his contract buys out the extra year of free agency.

At 14-6 with a league-leading 2.10 ERA in 26 starts, Weaver is a top contender for AL Cy Young honors this season.  He’s 78-45 with a 3.30 ERA since debuting in 2006.

  1. tgifinley88 - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:02 PM

    wow…….didn’t see this coming. due to the team and jered going to arbitration before i believed this wasn’t going to happen. good to see though, jered is one hell of a pitcher and angels need all the pitching they can get to compete against texas.

  2. hittfamily - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:29 PM

    I wonder what becomes of David Price. The Rays can’t afford a deal like that. He is under team control through 2015, but next year is arb eligible. They would like to lock him up long term, but not at those numbers. Perhaps Price is gone this offseason, rather than Shields. They could have any prospect in the game, plus 5 more if they choose to move him.

    • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 3:37 AM

      When I posted this hours ago, little did I know that in over 60 posts, it would be one of 2 actually related to baseball.

      • pauleee - Aug 22, 2011 at 11:04 AM

        Just got in, saw the headline (complete surprise) saw the number of comments (more surprised) and figured they must be slammng Weaver for his behavior the last few weeks.

        Didn’t see this threadjack coming.

  3. pjmarn6 - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:36 PM

    Completely obscene. The teacher’s salaries average $43,000 a year. Because he has a natural gift of eye hand coordination, he will earn 400 times a year more than a teacher????? Maybe he might win 17 games. Is he really worth $1,000,000 a game. Say he averages 7 innings a game. and gets 35 starts, is he worth $70,000 an inning or almost twice what a teacher gets paid a whole year?
    With these mad examples, no wonder the U.S. is broke! The inmates are running the asylum! Completely asinine!

    • Chris Fiorentino - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:48 PM

      While I can see what you are saying from a technical standpoint…sure pitchers aren’t worth more to society than teachers…the fact is that pitchers bring more money into the owners pocket than a teacher brings into the school system. If the owners weren’t making this much money, then the players wouldn’t be paid this much money. That’s the fact. And it has nothing to do with the US being “broke” or “inmates running the asylum”.

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:30 PM

        Don’t be ridiculous. The owners push the price everything up to pay these ridiculous salaries and you pay for it. Then complain you don’t have money for necessities and other things in life. The owners always made money. And the players made a good living. Now it is obscene. How much do you make a year? How many years do you have to work to make $17,000,000? Baseball used to be free on tv and radio. Now you have to pay through the nose. You all complain about the cost of gasoline and heating of house and food costs. Yet you shut up and bend over when it comes to sports and these ridiculous salaries. You all need to go back and take econ 101. You like to get shafted. Pay more for everything in sports because the players go on strike to get more money and benefits. Where are the added benefits to the fans? There are none. And since the pay raises far exceed the cost of living increments, the games become a farce.
        Those of you who cry and moan about jobs, gasoline, electrical costs and food costs, just look in the mirror. You are catering to an elite ridiculous cadre of people who can screw you because they can. You probably are the same ones who complain about company CEOs getting big bucks. You don’t have to just look at these people. With no education and nature’s gift of good eye hand coordination and the fans not saying boo, you make instant millionaires.

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:12 AM

        “You all complain about the cost of gasoline and heating of house and food costs. Yet you shut up and bend over when it comes to sports and these ridiculous salaries”

        Ummm? Those are necessities. Baseball games are a luxury. I’m also pissed about how much my flat screen TV costs, my Nikes, and the computer I’m writing on, but I have learned that these aren’t necessary to survival. If I were to complain, it would be to myself for purchasing them. You really need to educate yourself on something other than complaining.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:57 PM

      You post this same screed every time player salary gets mentioned. Every time, you get schooled in Econ 101. Do you enjoy making a fool out of yourself?

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:39 PM

        Bend over again Kevin. When you pay your cable bill or that super duper radio equipment to listen to the games or $10 hotdogs, you are getting it up the arse. And you must like it. The salaries just get bigger and the game looks about the same. I didn’t hear any complaints about the players getting huge salaries for juicing up on steroids and getting huge future salaries based on the illegal advantage they took.
        I know what I am saying. I bet you didn’t ever look up a players stats on this program. You just clic on the name and up comes all his stats from when he began his major league career. Try it. Just find a player’s name and clic on it. Up it pops. It used to give his salary too.
        But ….OOOOOPPPSSS they took down that feature. WHY? Because it is so ridiculous to see a .245 batter getting $5,000,000 a year. Or that 5.65 era pitcher getting $7,500,000 a year. And you are the fool paying him for that. And in five years in the major, he can retire and get a great pension when he retires. CAN YOU? And you are paying for that $200,000 a year pension. Now who is a fool?

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:02 AM

        I’d like to know where those $10 hot dogs are. Most places have them for less than half that price. Not even Yankee Stadium charges that much. But hey, whatever makes your point sound better, right? Super duper radio equipment? AM/FM radio still comes standard in any car, and it still doesn’t cost me anything to tune into the game.

        I’m very aware of what players are making. I’m probably more versed in the details than a ignoramus like you could even hope of comprehending. And you know something? The prices they charge have absolutely everything to do with the public’s willingness to pay and nothing to do with the player salaries. Because guess what? If three million people are willing to pay an average of $20/ticket, and two and a half million people are willing to pay an average of $30/ticket, the team is going to charge $30/ticket regardless of what players are making.

        I went to the Braves/Giants game in Turner Field last Thursday. The two tickets were $17 each, the Long Hammer IPA (which was delicious, by the way) was $6.50, and the chicken tenders w/ fries basket was $6.75. And you know what? Those prices would have been exactly the same if Tim Lincecum was making $80,000 instead of $8 million, because player salary (on a league-wide level) has absolutely no impact on fan experience. I paid those prices because I and thirty thousand of my closest friends were more than willing to pay those prices to watch a baseball game. Any time you feel that the cost of viewing a game is more than the value you get out of viewing the game, you can take your dollars elsewhere. Nobody’s forcing you to buy anything.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:06 AM

        Making this short b/c I’m passing out, but will be glad to continue in the morning

        Bend over again Kevin. When you pay your cable bill or that super duper radio equipment to listen to the games or $10 hotdogs, you are getting it up the arse. And you must like it. The salaries just get bigger and the game looks about the same.

        Good to see you didn’t take people’s advice. Those hot dogs are $10 because people are willing to pay $10 for them! This is what everyone is telling you. Same with your cable bill, same with ticket prices. A good businessman constantly raises the prices of his goods until they plateau. Once the supply outpaces the demand, then prices will fall.

        I didn’t hear any complaints about the players getting huge salaries for juicing up on steroids and getting huge future salaries based on the illegal advantage they took.

        Where did this come from? A, tons of pitchers took steroids so can we cut the crap about how it was only hitters who did it, and then used them to bulk up. In ’05, TB OF Alex Sanchez, he of 5’10” 180lb stature was caught taking steroids.

        Up it pops. It used to give his salary too.

        ESPN.com gives players salaries (only current years), Cot’s Baseball Contracts page gives contracts over everyone in the organization, bref.com gives salaries/signing and draft dates and transactions. It’s all over the web, should check it out.

        And in five years in the major, he can retire and get a great pension when he retires

        Doubt it, as it’s probably 10 years like it is in the NFL. Also, do they really get a great pension? Don’t see too many pro athletes living out their dreams into their 80s or 90s. Hospital bills, bad marriages, drugs catch up to them.

        Oh yeah, you could also just not buy the stuff.

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:15 AM

        Kevin can see you are a big baseball fan. You didn’t read about the Yankee vendors going on strike because the Yankees raised the hotdog prices to $10 for the fans in the box seats? They weren’t getting tips and went on strike.

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:16 AM

        Very, very well said Kevin.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:21 AM

        “in the box seats.”

        Right, the millionaires’ playpen. Glad you’re using that as your representative example.

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:03 AM

        pjmarn6

        It wasn’t because the hot dogs were $10. It had nothing to do with the cost of anything. It was because on the bill, there was a 20% service charge added. The patrons assumed it was a tip. It wasn’t. It was a charge that the Yankees kept. Mario Batali’s restaurant got into the same trouble. Country Clubs get into that same trouble all the time.

        No one went on strike either. They complained to a local newspaper, then filed a lawsuit against the food companies, not the Yankees. Now, the Yankees have signs ups saying the charge on the bill doesnt go to the vendors as a tip.

        http://www.nj.com/yankees/index.ssf/2011/05/yankee_stadium_waiters_file_la.html

    • hittfamily - Aug 21, 2011 at 9:58 PM

      Oh my god. Shut up!!!!

      Everytime someone signs a big deal, someone (likely you) makes this argument. It is supply and demand. Do you disagree with the largest tenet of any trade practice that has ever taken place, be it money for services, or chickens for goats? 5,000 chickens for 1 goat is a lot, but if everyone has a chicken, and no one has a goat, you get what you can get. Everyday, 50,000 people buy tickets to watch people like him play. They buy hot dogs, souveniers, pay to park, purchase gas to go to the games, watch the commercials on TV, then buy the products advertised. Many, many people have jobs and make money because of what this entertainer does. It is good for Los Angeles as a society to have him there, as a lot more money is generated and spent in the community because of what these guys do.

      You are comparing apples and bottles. The 2 aren’t even remotely related. There is a discussion as to whether teachers are underpaid, but there is no discussion as to what a private company pays it’s employees. If they determine Weaver generates 50 million dollars for the Angels, and 50 million dollars for other enterprises like New Era, Comcast, souvenier sellers, souvenier makers, local restaurants and bars, perhaps Weavers 17 million per year is a hell of a deal.

      And for what it’s worth, the US isn’t broke. The poor and middle class are broke. But when 95% of the money is controlled by 5% of the population, we may as well be broke.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 21, 2011 at 10:01 PM

        Not likely – it is him. I think he has the same post saved on his Clipboard.

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:09 AM

        No it is not supply and demand. It is the complete reverse what was before. Before a player signed a contract with a team and he was “property” of the club. That was broken by Catfish Hunter and it has never stopped since then. I didn’t mind when it was a bit more, but then it got out of hand and it was fools like you who paid and paid. Ticket prices went up and you paid. They stopped free games on tv and you didn’t say boo and just paid for cable tv. Then they cut off radio and no public outburst. You just bent over deeper. Now the Yankees have seats at $2300 and $10 beer and you say “PLEASE DO ME AGAIN”. How many of you have kids? Got their college tuition all funded? Got your retirement plans all nicely nestegged? Health insurance funded for the rest of your lives? Or are you pissing it away to make these players all multimillionaires?
        I doubt that they are 50,000 people paying to see a goat play. But I guarantee you that the players are happy to see the 50,000 goats in the stands getting soaked to watch the 2 hour game.
        Right you are an economics and value for money guy. Bet you bitch and moan about $4 a gallon for gas. Or the new taxes that are coming to pay for the debt. See you are happy that food costs are up 10%. And I know you have your pension completely funded. And your grandkids college costs, you have a policy paid up for them don’t you? Just one of those right guys who can’t wait to shell out a few thousand to take your family to a game and grouse when taxes go up! Sure talk to the workers at MacDonalds making $8 an hour and see what they think about Rodriquez getting $40,000 an abat. They will be thrilled to hear your defense of these coddled players.
        Sure making $50,000,000 for a cable network, junk souvenirs, you throw in the trash, and money for baseball executives. JESUS what great value! Hey did you think if you had the extra money if the players earned a decent salary, you could go out more often, or go to a bar more often or put a little more aside for retirement of health insurance or plan for your future better?
        And the middle class is not broke, not even the poor class. Travel a bit, like I have and see real poverty. Thousands of people begging in the streets. A hell of a lot of people in the world would live wonderfully on what we throw away.
        In Mexico, garbage men pay for their jobs. That’s right. They pay the boss so they can get first dibs on sorting the garbage and make money. Cops rent their patrol cars so they can collect the bribes.
        In India a whore will cost you a package of cigarettes. You want a wife? There are millions lined up to meet you. Just subscribe to any service and you got one.
        .25 cents will buy a meal in Africa.
        And $17,000,000 will get you a pitcher for a year in the U.S.
        I doubt you have a family. You would be thinking about them rather than championing a baseball player. And you would know that the economic system in the U.S. is the best in the world. That is why there is a line several million deep to come into the U.S. and the U.S. takes 1,050,000 immigrants a year.
        And the U.S. is broke. If it was a family, it would have applied for brankruptcy a long time ago. You got your numbers wrong hittfamily. The top 10% pay 95% of the taxes. And your great friend Weaver is now among that top 5% you are yelling about. Paying his manager 10% and his business manager 10% so he only has to pay 20% of his earnings as taxes instead of the mandatory 35%. You want to know how he does it? Just look in the mirror.

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:13 AM

        I doubt that they are 50,000 people paying to see a goat play. But I guarantee you that the players are happy to see the 50,000 goats in the stands getting soaked to watch the 2 hour game.
        Right you are an economics and value for money guy. Bet you bitch and moan about $4 a gallon for gas. Or the new taxes that are coming to pay for the debt. See you are happy that food costs are up 10%. And I know you have your pension completely funded. And your grandkids college costs, you have a policy paid up for them don’t you? Just one of those right guys who can’t wait to shell out a few thousand to take your family to a game and grouse when taxes go up! Sure talk to the workers at MacDonalds making $8 an hour and see what they think about Rodriquez getting $40,000 an abat. They will be thrilled to hear your defense of these coddled players.
        Sure making $50,000,000 for a cable network, junk souvenirs, you throw in the trash, and money for baseball executives. JESUS what great value! Hey did you think if you had the extra money if the players earned a decent salary, you could go out more often, or go to a bar more often or put a little more aside for retirement of health insurance or plan for your future better?
        And the middle class is not broke, not even the poor class. Travel a bit, like I have and see real poverty. Thousands of people begging in the streets. A hell of a lot of people in the world would live wonderfully on what we throw away.
        In Mexico, garbage men pay for their jobs. That’s right. They pay the boss so they can get first dibs on sorting the garbage and make money. Cops rent their patrol cars so they can collect the bribes.
        In India a whore will cost you a package of cigarettes. You want a wife? There are millions lined up to meet you. Just subscribe to any service and you got one.
        .25 cents will buy a meal in Africa.
        And $17,000,000 will get you a pitcher for a year in the U.S.
        I doubt you have a family. You would be thinking about them rather than championing a baseball player. And you would know that the economic system in the U.S. is the best in the world. That is why there is a line several million deep to come into the U.S. and the U.S. takes 1,050,000 immigrants a year.
        And the U.S. is broke. If it was a family, it would have applied for brankruptcy a long time ago. You got your numbers wrong hittfamily. The top 10% pay 95% of the taxes. And your great friend Weaver is now among that top 5% you are yelling about. Paying his manager 10% and his business manager 10% so he only has to pay 20% of his earnings as taxes instead of the mandatory 35%. You want to know how he does it? Just look in the mirror.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:18 AM

        And the U.S. is broke.

        Why do you keep saying this?

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:20 AM

        “I doubt that they are 50,000 people paying to see a goat play. But I guarantee you that the players are happy to see the 50,000 goats in the stands getting soaked to watch the 2 hour game.”

        I quit reading your thesis when I got to that brilliant line. Okay, I’ve figured it out. You aren’t uneducated, you’re just fucking retarded.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 21, 2011 at 10:02 PM

      Hi I’m Econ 101, doesn’t look like we’ve met. Should look up supply vs demand and get back to me.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 21, 2011 at 10:06 PM

        I’d say he should look up utility, indifference curves and budget restraints, but his head just might explode.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 21, 2011 at 10:13 PM

        Let’s get people to stop trumpeting that higher salaries = higher ticket prices, then we can move on to 102

      • hittfamily - Aug 21, 2011 at 10:58 PM

        I’m certainly no expert, but I remember when the UFL folded in the 80’s. The salariesgot huge, and so did the ticket prices.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:22 PM

        Start-up leagues trying to compete with an established brand are different. They paid salaries set by NFL revenues in an effort to lure talent, then had to set prices high and hope the demand would be there instead of determining a logical revenue maximizing price that actually considered the relative demand for it’s product. But you do make a good point in demonstrating how salary does NOT drive prices in a financially-healthy league.

      • hittfamily - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:56 PM

        No, I’m saying when the NFL had to pay higher salaries, their prices went up. The 1983 average salary in the NFL was $152,800. The next year, after the USFL began stealing away players, the average salary was $225,600, an increase of 47.6 percent — the largest jump in the league’s history.

        I haven’t found any info on ticket prices for the mid 80’s, but I remember the jump in ticket prices. It took fans out of the stadiums, because the cost was too high. My family was included in those who couldn’t afford it.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:11 AM

        an increase of 47.6 percent — the largest jump in the league’s history.

        It’s still supply and demand, but the goods have changed. In the current NFL the players are a fixed commodity, but watching them means the tickets are in demand. In your example, the players became the demand so prices skyrocketed. Although I’m still shocked that the USF/NFL situation caused the largest increase in prices, some of these deals lately for first rounders have been absurd.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:18 AM

        And if the ticket prices did lead to increased revenues, it simply showed NFL owners that they were pricing inefficiently. Waiting to hear the argument claiming they would have voluntarily left money on the table.

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:31 AM

        “And if the ticket prices did lead to increased revenues, it simply showed NFL owners that they were pricing inefficiently. Waiting to hear the argument claiming they would have voluntarily left money on the table.”

        The Red Sox have sold out every game since 2003. They have one of the smallest stadiums, if not the smallest, in the game. They could add seats, or raise ticket prices so they don’t sell out every game to generate more revenue. Yet they havn’t. They are leaving money on the table

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:42 AM

        Actually, they’ve both added seats AND raised ticket prices. The ticket prices are so high in their case precisely because the scarcity of seats. There’s a reason that the Yankees and Mets both built stadiums with significantly smaller capacities a couple years ago (although the Mets’ plans were fucked six ways to Sunday by incompetence and the economy).

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:51 AM

        I know they have added seats and raised prices, but not to their max. Until they raise the prices or build seats, and only average 80% capacity, they are leaving money on the table.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:03 AM

        Not necessarily. It depends on what they think a 25% across the board price increase would do. If that would drop their ticket sales, parking, concessions, etc. below 80% of current levels, then it’s not worth it. If less than a 25% increase dropped them to 80%, they’d lose money. P1*Q1 = TR1. If (P2-P1) < 1/(Q1-Q2), you don't go to P2, because that makes TR2 < TR1

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:22 AM

        That is only assuming they lose in attendance with a 25% increase. Judging by the price I paid to see the Rays in 2007, (the last time I went to Boston), I don’t think a 50% increase would change their attendance. I paid 6 times ticket value, and was excited to go to the game.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:35 AM

        You said that until they were at 80%, they wouldn’t have maximized their revenues. I’m just showing how that isn’t necessarily true. The Red Sox have done a lot to squeeze revenue out of that stadium. I’m willing to bet they have a pretty good idea of what the relationship between price and quantity change is.

  4. jimatkins - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:16 PM

    Hey- I’m a teacher, I took 14 units of Econ back in the day (accounting major at CSUF), and I have no problem with Weaver making a ton of money. Now, a fair capital gains tax rate so Warren Buffett pays about the same tax rate overall as his receptionist, that I’m for. But people that generate a ton of money for the team and the league, I have no problem with their skill and talent being rewarded.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 21, 2011 at 11:56 PM

      Any chance you saw this article? Buffet is asking to be taxed more. Why do you ask? Because last year his federal tax bill was
      $6,938,744. That sounds like a lot of money. But what I paid was only 17.4 percent of my taxable income — and that’s actually a lower percentage than was paid by any of the other 20 people in our office. Their tax burdens ranged from 33 percent to 41 percent and averaged 36 percent.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/15/opinion/stop-coddling-the-super-rich.html

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:05 AM

        What you paid most likely doesn’t include your employers payroll tax, that was paid on your behalf. Take your SS and medicare/medicaid and double it for what the Fed Gov received on your behalf. Since it caps at $64,000, Buffet doesn’t have to pay any SS or medicaid (I mean he does, but 20x% of 64,000 when you make Xmillion per year is nothing). The most aggravating argument is “The poor and lower middle class pay no federal income tax”. While this is true, they pay other federal tax, such as SS, medicare, gas taxes, internet/cable/phone, etc… In Florida, there is no income tax, yet the state governemnt has yet to bounce a check, proving there are other ways the Fed Gov generates money FOX NEWS!!!

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:14 AM

        Oh I agree, and that’s why I laugh every time politicians discuss increasing taxes on the rich to offset tax cuts on the middle class. Cutting/Raising payroll taxes on individuals who pay minimal amounts is using a thimble to save the Titanic. In that article Buffett mentions lowering middle class taxes but increasing capital gains and dividends, and increasing the tax% on those who make over $1M and further increasing it for those making it over $10M.

        As he put it, back when capital gains was taxed at 39.99%, he was still investing. Rich people want to make money, and will continue to do so.

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:19 AM

        And exemptions. Yeah… about those. The tax code shouldn’t be a policy tool.

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:20 AM

        Yeah was shooting his mouth off again. BUT did you see him write out a check for $100,000,000 to the IRS because he wasn’t charged enough tax?

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:37 AM

        Shooting his mouth off? He’s right. We are in 2 wars, and lowering taxes. When Eisenhower was president, the top tier tax rate was almost 90%. When Reagan took over, the top tax rate was over 50%. It is currently hovering around 30%, and yet the rich…I mean job creators, want it lower. Class warfare has happened, but the rich one that war decades ago.

  5. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:24 AM

    Hittfamily, READ AND THINK! Florida doesn’t need an income tax because it is a vacation state with a large sales tax! Try renting a car or a room and get hit with those state taxes. Knew you weren’t bright on economics, but you can think. Florida wants retirees to pay for everything they buy. And it is a non union state so they don’t pay all those extras to workers. See if you lived there, you could pay more to help your friendly baseball player!

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:28 AM

      Per wikipedia:
      Florida has a general sales tax rate of 6%.[61]…A “discretionary sales surtax” may be imposed by the counties of up to 1.5%…

      This is less than what I pay, and I live in NC (just north of Charlotte). So what else you got for us?

      • pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:34 AM

        church look up the revenue. Last time I looked North Carolina was not a tourist state. Millions of people don’t visit North Carolina in the winter.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:38 AM

        Florida doesn’t need an income tax because it is a vacation state with a large sales tax!

        6% is not a large income tax. It was the same in CT when I grew up (now 6.3% iirc). NYC has 8.25%, that’s large. When the basis of your argument is that “vacation spot + sales tax = large revenue = no income tax”, you should have a large sales tax or your argument falls apart.

    • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:41 AM

      Vacation has nothing to do with it. Want a fishing license in Florida. Half price if you live there. Sales taxes aren’t higher either. They have no income tax because they want to promote rich retirees to come and start a business. They make their money on the backs of the middle class, not the upper.

  6. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:32 AM

    Kevin, I am going to let you in a little secret. The owners are RICH! They hire the best accounting and statistics firms in the world to tell them how much more they can screw you out of without you oinking. They don’t give a damn about you and your needs. They want your money! Now I don’t need their games. I have my memories of the great players and the good games and the great announcers and I remember Yogi Berra catching that pitch that was so far out of the strike zone and the home plate umpire jumping up and calling it a third strike and Yogi jumping into Larsen’s arms! I remember going on long trips and tuning into baseball games in the car.
    You can’t do that now. The game is spoiled. Everyone is yelling and screaming about the billions that the politicians are paying themselves and wasting and throwing away but no one is yelling about the billions spent on these pampered people.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:33 AM

      You can’t do that now

      Why not? Did the men in the white outfits take away your radio?

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:49 AM

      So… you’re completely acknowledging everything we’ve been saying the entire time? Rich people hire smart people to figure out how to make the most money possible? You know, the opposite of reactionary price increases you were shouting about upthread? And you’re going to act like you’re the one giving us knowledge? Seriously, get the fuck out of here, you stupid-ass troll.

  7. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:47 AM

    church just looked it up. North Carolina sales tax generates 1.3 billion dollars. Florida’s sales tax generates 23 billion dollars. Duh you see the difference? Back to the dunce chair for you in econ 101.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:53 AM

      Yeah… volume of sales. Because when one state charges 5.75%, and the other state charges 6%, it’s not the tax rate that’s causing the disparity. Back to the dunce chair in fourth-grade multiplication for you.

      • hittfamily - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:13 AM

        Wow. This dude is incredibly dense. Because 1 state’s tax rate is 1/4 of 1% higher, in his mind, that explains why one state’s tax revenue is 2000% higher than the other. Brilliant

        Hey PJ. You should run for state senate, and raise NC’s state tax to 6%. You would have an extra 20 billion dollars. Free health care, cars, vacations, and hookers to all North Carolinians.

        pjmarn6 – 2012

  8. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:51 AM

    church oh boy. The yankees have set up their own private radio system. You have to pay to listen to their games and you have to pay to watch the games. You are too young to remember watching them free on tv and listening to them free on the radio. The games on tv and radio were free because the SPONSORS paid to have them on tv and radio. Now its pay, pay, pay. And while you are at it, take a look at the cost of seating at Yankee stadium down by the first and third base lines. You see all those nice $2000+ seats?

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:56 AM

      Last time I checked, I still pay zero US dollars to turn the dial to 880 AM. And bleacher seats still cost $15. Do you know why the Yankees ran the prices up on those seats? They saw the secondary market exploding for many times face value, realized they were underpricing their product, and reacted accordingly. Given their difficulty selling those seats, they overshot, but StubHub had more to do with those prices than Sabathia.

  9. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:57 AM

    Right the baseball owners, once they knew you would pay through your nose to watch or listen or go to the stadium decided that you were easily separated from your paycheck. And as you need the latest telephone gizmo or computer gadget or neat new electronic toy, they price them to pry you out of your weekly paycheck. That is a given. Hey I have a double major biology and economics but my parents were depression babies and it stuck with me. I pay for what I need and want AFTER the needs of my whole family are met. That is the way I was brought up and that is the way I brought up my children.
    I got a good look at Jeter’s mansion on Tampa Bay. And I got a good look at Yogi Berra’s house in Montclair, New Jersey. It is only about 7 miles from my house. It looks a bit more elegant but he made his money a little earlier than I did. Now Jeter is single why does he need a 7 bedroom 10 bathroom house on a bay with 6 giant outdoor jacuzzis?

  10. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:00 AM

    Kevin, my boy, what is the Yankee payroll? What is the Tampa Bay payroll? What is the Yankee revenue and where does it come from?

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:11 AM

      International brand recognition. A massive RSN they hold a 35% stake in. A metro area with twenty million residents, many of whom are incredibly wealthy. Thus, the Yankees can afford a much larger payroll than the Rays. Which is what we were saying the entire time. Stop pretending you’re telling us anything. You were trying to say earlier that the cart was leading the horse. You are now arguing against your previous statements. Go reply to those and call your past self the moron it was.

  11. pjmarn6 - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:10 AM

    Kevin and Church, you don’t want to read my complaints about overpaid players, simple don’t read. After all you are paying not me.

    • kiwicricket - Aug 22, 2011 at 2:12 AM

      pjmarn6-
      I see your point, and what you are trying to relay. But your points being made are done so in such an over-board obnoxious manner, it’s very difficult to respond adequately with tact.
      Please remember that when trying to make a point on here, you are being read by many more people than just the two guys you are having a disagreement with. I was interested in your opinion as to why you disagree so strongly, but now find it very difficult to take you seriously. Others on here don’t appreciate your condescending manner.
      I actually sympathise with your ideas about the dollars being made, and the wastefulness of society. I see first-hand every time I pass through the States, small kids with I-pads, expensive phones….adults with every conceivable gadget you can think of. And I happen to bite my lip when you hear about the economy in the States this…the economy that…down the tubes…The basic standard of living is considerably higher than most countries in the world. I understand that. Many do. But is this the correct forum to discuss this?
      I currently live and work in India. I have people who work for me who make under a dollar a day. I don’t need you and your little stories about Mexican garbage workers, or anything else you’ve read in a magazine some place. Yes, it’s a crying shame. I don’t appreciate your half assed swipe at Kevin or the others for not being as ‘Worldly’ as you.
      As a former semi-professional cricket player, I am more than aware of the economics and social issues involved. As I mentioned last week, A guy made 500K last year eating hot-dogs quickly, obscene salaries are not confined to Baseball or professional sports.
      Again, others on here don’t appreciate your condescending manner.
      A teacher, who is God awful at their job, is utterly hopeless, will make 40K per year. An assistant principal at a good school will make 100K plus. See how the scale works? A Baseball player playing at the highest possible level on the planet, in the top few percentile of their chosen profession will make a bucket load of cash. IT’S THE SAME IN ANY INDUSTRY. But don’t think for one minute that these guys won’t be cast aside like used parts or old socks if their skills deteriorate. And so the cycle continues.
      You seem to have two arguments. Salaries and social. One of them has no business on here. The other is your opinion, and you are welcome to it. Just please try add a bit of tact to your posts.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2011 at 8:45 AM

      Then complain about overpaid players. The thing is, you’ll probably get more sympathy if you just complain about them, rather than bring some tinfoiled-hat reason into why they are overpaid because it’s obvious you don’t understand economics.

  12. jimbo1949 - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:38 AM

    If you’re gonna get down and wrestle with a pig in the mud, you might as well enjoy yourself because the pig sure does.
    .
    Don’t nourish the bridge substructure symbionts.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 1:42 AM

      Yeah, but… http://xkcd.com/386/

  13. Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 2:41 AM

    You know, I must be out of it tonight. I could have ended this farcial idea that high salaries are responsible for skyrocketing prices with four letters.

    NCAA.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 2:42 AM

      * Farcical.

      #OldGater

      • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 2:42 AM

        Oh, what the eff? My edit needs an edit?!

  14. florida727 - Aug 22, 2011 at 9:13 AM

    Face it, both sides of the argument are valid. If you complain that ballplayers make too much compared to teachers, firefighters, policemen, etc., yeah, of course they do. Your recourse is simple… don’t support the team by paying $10 for a hot dog or $17 for a ticket or $10 for parking… or watching them on TV (because advertisers contribute to the economics of the game too, and advertisers pay based on ratings; so the argument of, “if you can’t afford to go, just watch it free on TV” doesn’t hold water either). It really is a matter of supply and demand. The owners can get away with charging it, because people are (or I should say ENOUGH people), are willing to pay it. Since the owners are making it, the players can ask for, and get, their share of it. Until EVERYONE says, enough is enough, it won’t change… and there will always be people willing to pay it, so guess what, it won’t, at least for the foreseeable future, change.

  15. hansob - Aug 22, 2011 at 10:00 AM

    The only “baseball players are overpaid” arguement I’ll listen to is the one that involves the continued decisions by politicians to pay for or help pay for stadiums, thus giving owners more money to spend on players that other, non-subsidized businesses don’t get. That’s it. That’s the list. Otherwise, it’s supply and demand. As long as folks are willing to shell out $100 on parking/ticket/food to see a winning team play ball, owners are going to invest in players that will help them attract that customer.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 22, 2011 at 10:14 AM

      Yes, this. Point we missed last night. If you have a problem with players being overpaid, go after the politicians who are complicit in those scams, the way the citizens of Miami did. And even still, it’s the owners doing the ripping off, which they’d do regardless of what the players are getting. But ending public financing would depress player salaries.

  16. paperlions - Aug 22, 2011 at 12:15 PM

    Not a single comment about Boras? People realize that he works FOR his clients right? and that he does what they want, even being the bad guy to deflect blame from the player, right? right? No? You still blame Boras for everything? Okay then…

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