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The Yu Darvish winner will be announced tonight

Dec 19, 2011, 9:27 AM EST

darvish getty japan team Getty Images

The Nippon-Ham Fighters will announce the winner of the Yu Darvish sweepstakes Tuesday morning, Japan time, which means we’ll know who gets the chance to negotiate with him tonight.

It was reported on Friday that the Blue Jays are the likely top bidders.  We’ll see. The fact that it has not been confirmed by a bunch of people makes me wonder, but we do know that the Yankees were low, so Toronto could definitely be it.

As we learned over the weekend, the posting fee will set a record, landing the Fighters north of $51 million.  At times like these I just choose to ignore how ridiculous the whole posting system is.

  1. proudlycanadian - Dec 19, 2011 at 9:42 AM

    The bids are supposed to be secret, so there is no way that we know for sure. By the way, a couple of reporters have written that the Jays were finalists for Latos, so it makes sense that they are also interested in Gio Gonzalez. I am not surprised that they are trying to land a couple of starting pitchers. The Rays have shown that pitching is important in the AL East.

    • b7p19 - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:02 AM

      The Rays have been very successful the last six years, but I don’t think we can give them credit for the revelation that pitching is important.

      • proudlycanadian - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:25 AM

        Pitching tends to win in the playoffs. New York won the AL East last year, but their sub standard starting pitching rotation faltered a tad in the playoffs.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Dec 19, 2011 at 12:27 PM

        New York won the AL East last year, but their sub standard starting pitching rotation faltered a tad in the playoffs

        Not sure if serious, but this is blatantly false.

    • chadjones27 - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:14 AM

      I can picture the thought process in the Blue Jays management: Good bye Roy Halladay, we won’t need pitching since we have Batista who will crank us about 600 HR’s/ year. What? Pitching is important? Crap…

      • proudlycanadian - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:21 AM

        Crappy argument. Halladay had told the team that he planned to become a free agent. They were fortunate to get decent players in return.

      • chadjones27 - Dec 19, 2011 at 3:25 PM

        Wasn’t really an argument. More of a random thought, albeit, not a very well executed one. Just thought it was kind of odd that they’d drop that kind of cash (if the reports are true) for the right to negotiate a contract with an unproven commodity. Figured the money spent between the posting and a new contract could have been used to try to keep Doc in Toronto. Granted, hind sight and all that, Toronto probably didn’t foresee any of this and did get “prospects.”

    • Ari Collins - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:35 AM

      Pitching is no more important than hitting. (Less, actually, maybe, since fielding also accounts for a lot of run prevention.)

      If the Rays have shown that pitching is important in the AL East, than the Sox and Yankees have shown that hitting is important in the AL East.

      There’s a lot of ways to get there, is what I’m saying. And a lot of ways to do well once you do.

      • bowens3181 - Dec 19, 2011 at 11:20 AM

        I’m pretty sure that this passed season Boston actually proved that pitching is more important, as they had one of the best hitting corps , but their pitching disintegrated and they fell out of a playoff spot.
        Using the Yankees as an example also doesn’t make sense since while their hitting was great, they also had, while not elite, a good pitching staff that was capable of stealing games for them at times.
        I would agree that both aspects are important but if you want two clear pieces of evidence that illustrate why pitching can win you more games then hitting can, you simply have to look at the difference in success between the Jays and Rays (I’m a poet) in recent years. The Rays always score a below average amount of runs, yet make regular appearances in the playoffs due to their stud pitching staffs, and in recent years the Jays have ranked among the league leaders in runs scored and yet their pitching has been keeping them out of the playoffs.

      • Ari Collins - Dec 19, 2011 at 12:21 PM

        Boston actually proved that you can win 90 games with poor pitching. They only proved that 90 games isn’t enough to make the playoffs, but winning 90 games is no small feat.

        Compare that to the Angels, who had the 2nd best pitching staff in the league, but couldn’t score runs, and won 86 games.

        The Yankees had good pitching but not great last season, and they won 97 games. In 2009, they won 103 games and a championship despite being in the middle of the pack in pitching.

        What’s more, while I’ve said “pitching,” what I’ve really meant is “run prevention,” and the fact is that a not inconsiderable portion of teams like the Rays’ run prevention is a result of their team defense.

      • Ari Collins - Dec 19, 2011 at 12:46 PM

        And the Jays, while technically “among the league leaders” in runs scored last year (5th out of 14), they were as far from 1st as from 13th (14th was the Mariners, who set records for being bad at scoring).

  2. buffalochris - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:04 AM

    Question here: are the Nippon-Ham Fighters at liberty to “choose” the winning bid, or are they bound to select the HIGHEST bid? I ask b/c it seems plausible that the highest bid might not be the most logical seeing as if the winning team is unable to come to terms of a contract with Yu then the Nippon-Ham Fighters have to return the posting bid $$$.

    So given that Yu is collecting $18m/yr over there and all reports are suggesting it will take $75/5years to land him then maybe the BJ’s aren’t the best fit even though they might have the largest bid.

    Get what I’m saying here…. the Fighters might be better off selecting a lower bid b/c they might actually stand a chance of keeping the posting fee from say the Yanks @ $20-30m because then the contract would keep him under the $100m total. Otherwise the Fighters might not collect any of the posting fee just because some nimrod dumped in a retarded bid.

    And given this question…. could a team then tank all other teams possibilities of landing a Japanese talent via this process by just bidding $1 Billion and then not coming to terms on a contract therefore returning the player to the Japanese league?

    • hittfamily - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:24 AM

      Don’t ask questions about the process here. It is a very confusing process, but these bastards will be real shitty to you for asking about it.

      • jwbiii - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:36 AM

        It’s a fairly simple process. My parents were married. I’ll explain anything I know and I try to do it in a non-condescending manner (unless you have been an asshole to me in the past). I like having more well-informed people to converse with.

      • hittfamily - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:40 AM

        what???

        My parents are married too???

      • bowens3181 - Dec 19, 2011 at 11:23 AM

        You referred to bastards. He said his parents are married, meaning he is not a bastard. Very simply…

    • lardin - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:27 AM

      They have to take the highest bid, but they dont get paid until the MLB team works out a contract. If MLB and the Japanese league think the MLB team did not negotiate a contract in good faith then they can award Darvish’s rights to the next highest bidder. This means, the if the Blue Jays were in fact the high bidder just to block the Yankees or the Sox from getting him and offered him a three year 10 million dollar deal, The powers that be could award him to the next highest bidder. If the MLB team negotiates in good faith and still no contract is agreed to, Darvish goes back to Japan, and the Fighters receive no money.

      • buffalochris - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:35 AM

        Great, thanks for the info!

    • jwbiii - Dec 19, 2011 at 10:30 AM

      “Question here: are the Nippon-Ham Fighters at liberty to “choose” the winning bid, or are they bound to select the HIGHEST bid?”

      Only Chairman Bud knows what the other bids are. He forwards the highest bid the Japanese commissioner who forwards it to the Japanese team. The team decides if it is high enough and accepts or declines it.

      “And given this question…. could a team then tank all other teams possibilities of landing a Japanese talent via this process by just bidding $1 Billion and then not coming to terms on a contract therefore returning the player to the Japanese league?”

      That bothers me, too. If Chairman Bud decides there are shenanigans of this sort going on, he can submit the next highest bid. This has never happened.

      Paragraphs 8 through 13 cover the posting procedure.

      http://bizofbaseball.com/docs/USJapaneseAgreement.pdf

      The repeated use of “U.S.” in this document bothers me, as sometimes a Canadian team may be relevant.

      • cur68 - Dec 19, 2011 at 11:02 AM

        “The repeated use of “U.S.” in this document bothers me, as sometimes a Canadian team may be relevant.”

        Yeah, but so many of you Americans are charming and pleasant people that we cool with it….

      • bowens3181 - Dec 19, 2011 at 11:24 AM

        Speak for yourself…

      • cur68 - Dec 19, 2011 at 12:17 PM

        Yeah, yeah, edit fail on my part, because I generally try to speak only for myself. Still, one of my favorite things about my fellow Canucks is how untouchy they are. Y’know, generally pretty tolerant? When I was in Tahiti last year I recall shamelessly eavesdropping on a family from Texas who all had Canadian flags on their various bags. The father was struggling to order a Shriley Temple for his daughter but didn’t know how to do it in french. I did it for him (bartender didn’t know the recipe so it was a bit of a process). My new Texan friend was quite surprised to find out that I was a Canadian since I looked like a local to him. Myself and my Canadian friends pointedly, by unspoken agreement, didn’t ask him where in Canada he was from. We cool like that.

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