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Ron Swanson’s Baseball Hall of Fame

Jan 11, 2012, 10:06 AM EDT

Ron Swanson

As happens every year, the days after the Hall of Fame announcement are filled with people making suggestions about how to fix the Hall of Fame, the voting and all of that.

There are tiers suggested, in which Babe Ruth and Willie Mays sit on top and Jim Rice, George Kell and Lloyd Waner rest on the bottom.  Alterations to the voting, ranging from the “panel of experts” to the “million monkeys with a million typewriters” models are suggested. Clearly, when it gets to this part of the season it is the best of times and it is the blurst of times, in terms of discussion topics, depending on your point of view.

Here’s one more suggestion though, floated by The Common Man:  The Ron Swanson Hall of Fame. It comes with induction categories such as guys who are elected by virtue of their toughness, their “unquenchable iconoclasm” and for their love of meat and scotch.  The latter of which should probably be its own Hall of Fame, but that’s a topic for another day.

Anyway, if you know who Ron Swanson is you should enjoy it. If you don’t, well, “Parks and Rec” is available on Netflix Instant.

  1. danteswitness - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:22 AM

    Iconoclasm plus a love of scotch and meat probably puts Babe Ruth at the top of the list, but that criteria might put Tony LaRussa at number two.

    • Roger Moore - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:55 AM

      I doubt it, given that LaRussa is a vegetarian, and the number of spectacular drunks in the Hall of Fame.

      • thefalcon123 - Jan 11, 2012 at 12:26 PM

        Yeah, the photo on LaRussa’s twitter page (smiling, holding a puppy in one hand and a kitten in the other) would disqualify him immediately.

  2. kiwicricket - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:24 AM

    Without trying to illicit crude or unnecessary comments towards me, this guy looks IDENTICAL to my father.

    • b7p19 - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:33 AM

      Your Father has a great mustache…and he’s awesome.

    • shea801 - Jan 11, 2012 at 12:30 PM

      Then your father is a great great man. I hope you provide him plenty of turf and turf meals accompanied with a good scotch.

  3. lyon810 - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:25 AM

    How Ty Cobb is not in every category of this list is ignorant and blasphemy

    • kpow55 - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:36 AM

      He got more votes than Babe Ruth.

      I think the book that turned into the Tommy Lee Jones movie that turned out to be a work 0f 80% fiction from a sports writer chasing a check really damaged his modern day perception.

      Statistically and physically he was the best of his era.

      Not the best comparison (as he can’t be justly compared) but he is to Pujols to Ruth’s David Ortiz. Both great, one is just distinctly better.

      • kpow55 - Jan 11, 2012 at 4:44 PM

        For all the thumbs down who think Babe Ruth was the greatest ever because their dad told them so…

        wiki: After enduring several years of seeing his fame and notoriety usurped by Ruth, Cobb decided that he was going to show that swinging for the fences was no challenge for a top hitter. On May 5, 1925, Cobb began a two-game hitting spree better than any even Ruth had unleashed. He was sitting in the dugout talking to a reporter and told him that, for the first time in his career, he was going to swing for the fences. That day, Cobb went 6 for 6, with two singles, a double, and three home runs.[71] His 16 total bases set a new AL record. The next day he had three more hits, two of which were home runs. Cobb’s single his first time up gave him 9 consecutive hits over three games. His five homers in two games tied the record set by Cap Anson of the old Chicago NL team in 1884.[71] Cobb wanted to show that he could hit home runs when he wanted, but simply chose not to do so. At the end of the series, 38-year-old Cobb had gone 12 for 19 with 29 total bases, and then went happily back to bunting and hitting-and-running.

        At 38!

      • K. Harker - Jan 11, 2012 at 4:58 PM

        Well, I know from Ken Burns’ Baseball that he was a heck of a player, and one of the worst human beings to ever put on a uniform. You can’t really beat him hospitalizing a handicapped fan (stomped on him with his cleats), or physically assaulting the black wife of the groundskeeper just for talking to him. I haven’t read the book or seen the Tommy Lee Jones movie, but they’d have a hard time making him worse than he was (unless you meant specifically his skill on the field was downplayed).

        I always thought the stats of the time were biased though. Cobb was spectacular, but the best? They didn’t let him play against the best in those days. And when they did play the Negro League teams, they lost 75% of the time. So… was he the best? We don’t know cause he wasn’t playing the best to get those stats.

        Don’t forget Ruth was as good a pitcher as he was a hitter. That’s the remarkable thing about him. I heard someone once describe it as similar to finding out Beethoven and Cezanne were the same person. Don’t know that it makes him the best all-time, but it’s a good argument.

      • K. Harker - Jan 11, 2012 at 5:01 PM

        Well, I know from Ken Burns’ Baseball that he was a heck of a player, and one of the worst human beings to ever put on a uniform. You can’t really beat him hospitalizing a handicapped fan (stomped on him with his cleats), or physically assaulting the black wife of the groundskeeper just for talking to him. I haven’t read the book or seen the Tommy Lee Jones movie, but they’d have a hard time making him worse than he was (unless you meant specifically his skill on the field was downplayed).

        I always thought the stats of the time were biased though. Cobb was spectacular, but the best? They didn’t let him play against the best in those days. And when they did play the Negro League teams, they lost 75% of the time. So… was he the best? We don’t know cause he wasn’t playing the best to get those stats.

        Don’t forget Ruth was as good a pitcher as he was a hitter. That’s the remarkable thing about him. Daniel Okrent said, “It is as if imagining that Beethoven and Cézanne were one person producing the same work.” Don’t know that it makes him the best ever, but it’s a good argument.

      • K. Harker - Jan 11, 2012 at 5:02 PM

        Stupid double post. Sorry about that.

      • paperlions - Jan 12, 2012 at 7:26 AM

        So….we are supposed to believe that Cobb played worse on purpose? That he could hit .667 swinging for the fences, but chose not to? Uh huh.

      • Cris E - Jan 12, 2012 at 11:55 AM

        Wow.

        For all you baseball historians who think this web thing is awesome and new because your dad told you so, go google “he could have if he wanted to” and “cordially”. There’s little new under the sun.

        Also, if Cobb is Pujols to Ruth’s Ortiz, go back and review just how good a pitcher Ortiz was.

        Finally, to be fair it’s probably true that too much of Cobb’s legacy does turn on that book/movie, but that doesn’t really justify overturning their records. What they chose to do or to emphasize is as important as anything else when it comes to posterity’s account of redefining the game and rewriting the record books. If Cobb still could have hit .367 while jacking 25 bombs a year, was it esthetic concerns that made him choose otherwise or did he really think trading average for power wasn’t worth it?

  4. a125125125 - Jan 11, 2012 at 10:26 AM

    Curt Schilling is already preparing the acceptance speech for his first ballot induction into the Jim Rice-tier.

  5. mreezybreezy - Jan 11, 2012 at 11:28 AM

    …THE BLURST OF TIMES?!?!

  6. paperlions - Jan 11, 2012 at 12:01 PM

    Isn’t the “million monkeys with a million typewriters” the model already used for HOF elections?

  7. klownboy - Jan 11, 2012 at 12:20 PM

    Barry Larkin’s induction was well deserved.

    http://theklowntimes.net/2012/01/10/barry-larkin-deserving-of-hall-of-fame-induction/

  8. joshftw - Jan 11, 2012 at 2:50 PM

    The Hall of Fame should adopt the Ron Swanson Pyramid of Greatness. It’s a much better system than the one in place now.

  9. kpow55 - Jan 12, 2012 at 12:06 AM

    They played in the same era so the competition argument won’t float. Their peers gave Cobb more hall votes and voted him a better player in polls. If you buy the despicable personality stories as fact and not part of a self created legend/ mental intimidation game….. His peers would have to hate him and still vote Cobb a better player.

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