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Four different Marlins pitchers walked four straight batters to force in a run last night

Apr 25, 2012, 2:14 PM EDT

Miami Marlins v Washington Nationals Getty Images

Last night the Marlins did something no other team in baseball history has ever done when four different pitchers combined to walk four consecutive batters, loading the bases and then forcing in what was the tying run.

It all began when starter Josh Johnson walked the final batter he faced, Lucas Duda, with two outs in the seventh inning. Ozzie Guillen removed Johnson from the game and brought in Randy Choate, who then walked pinch-hitter Justin Turner. That was it for Choate and he was replaced by Steve Cishek, who walked Scott Hairston. And finally Guillen brought in Mike Dunn, who walked Josh Thole.

Four pitchers, four plate appearances, four walks. Amazing. And here’s the kicker: Marlins pitchers issued zero walks in the game’s other 29 plate appearances … and Miami lost 2-1.

Here’s hoping Showtime devotes an entire episode of The Franchise to that half-inning or at the very least features a montage of Ozzie Guillen walking back and forth from the dugout to the mound while the Benny Hill music plays.

  1. al25ny - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:27 PM

    Should have left Johnson in the game

  2. Old Gator - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:34 PM

    Perhaps the first documented evidence that Steve Blass DIsease (SBD) is infectious.

    • stex52 - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:41 PM

      Man, you must have been gritting your teeth through that sequence, gator.

      • Old Gator - Apr 25, 2012 at 6:41 PM

        No, as a matter of fact, I was at a fantastic Cowboy Junkies concert at the 20th Century Theater in the charming and picturesque Oakley district of Cincinnati (just got off the warp shuttle at Macondo Interdimensional about an hour ago) and was in such a good mood by the time I got back to my hotel room last night that when ESPN ran the story all I could do was giggle.

        Tomorrow, I’ll feel the whiplash.

    • ajcardsfan - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:44 PM

      Gator only saw the first 2 pitchers before he got angry and decided to yell at kids rather than watching the game

      • Old Gator - Apr 25, 2012 at 6:32 PM

        How can you not love W. C. Fields?

    • natstowngreg - Apr 25, 2012 at 5:36 PM

      Back in the day, the Pirates were my favorite NL team. What happened to Steve Blass in 1973 was terrible, and came out of nowhere.

      In 1971, he won two World Series games, including Game 7.
      In 1972, he was 19-8, 2.49.
      By mid-1973, he was finished.

      http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/b/blassst01.shtml

      BTW, Blass turned 70 last week, so a belated Happy Birthday to him.

      Is there a foundation for SBD research, to which I can contribute? Rick Ankiel could do a telethon for it.

      • Old Gator - Apr 25, 2012 at 6:34 PM

        Sure, and Jerry Lewis runs it, and the theme song is – are you ready to cringe for all you’re worth? – “Look at us, we’re walking.”

      • natstowngreg - Apr 25, 2012 at 11:43 PM

        duly cringed

    • bigredleaf - Apr 25, 2012 at 6:23 PM

      This (below) aired earlier in April. The first part includes a recent interview with Steve Blass.

      http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/462/own-worst-enemy

  3. unlost1 - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:43 PM

    i blame Fidel Castro

    • Old Gator - Apr 26, 2012 at 12:07 AM

      A lot of that goes on here in Macondo.

  4. WhenMattStairsIsKing - Apr 25, 2012 at 2:54 PM

    That sequence was Ozzie’s plan all along!

    What a twist!!

  5. randall351 - Apr 25, 2012 at 3:05 PM

    Oh, don’t worry I’m sure the way this year is going the Royals will also do this by the time the season is over.

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