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Here’s a neat baseball road trip

Apr 30, 2012, 12:32 PM EDT

CAC Road Trip

I love baseball and I love road trips, so when I see stuff like this, I’m gonna pass it along to you:

Wrigleyville, the neighborhood around Wrigley Field in Chicago, is the best baseball neighborhood in the country. But, for me, a road trip from Louisville, Ky., to Cooperstown, N.Y., is the quintessential baseball journey — from the place where bats are shaped to its greatest shrine, with stops along the way at great baseball parks.

The Louisville and Cooperstown parts of it are obvious, but there are some neat Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York stops in between that most of you probably haven’t considered.

Including Columbus, so if you make the trip, give me a call and I’ll let you buy me a beer.

  1. hojo20 - Apr 30, 2012 at 12:37 PM

    I’ve been to Cooperstown a couple of times, a 250 mile drive. It’s only so-so and not worth the trip anymore with these gas prices. For all the baseball history there is, I went through the entire museum in 4 hours. it’s quite small.

    • yankeesfanlen - Apr 30, 2012 at 12:41 PM

      Was going to put in a similar crack, but thought they might have expanded it in the 20+ years since I’ve been there

    • mybrunoblog - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:15 PM

      I went up there last spring. Always a neat place to visit but I agree that you can see the whole museum in 4, 5 or 6 hours. It drives me nuts when the HOF proudly says, ” we have so much material that at any given time 90% of our items aren’t being displayed” Ummm, hello, we want to see that stuff people!
      I understand logistically that they display all of it but 90% unseen? Awful job HOF.

      • mybrunoblog - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:18 PM

        Last sentence from above post was supposed to read

        I understand logistically that they can’t display all of it but 90% unseen? Awful job HOF.

      • kopy - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:28 PM

        For what it’s worth, the NFL HOF in Canton, OH has a comparable ratio of items not on display.

      • nolanwiffle - Apr 30, 2012 at 2:51 PM

        I went to the NFL HoF 20 years ago and thought I was on Candid Camera….it was horrendous (other than the bronze busts). It was mostly mannequins in team uniforms standing in front of a few action photos of each teams’ inductees.

  2. yankeesfanlen - Apr 30, 2012 at 12:39 PM

    When you get to the middle of nowhere, Cooperstown is fifty miles northwest.
    Louisville, on the other hand, has the Derby coming up and a mint julep is mighty refreshing. Just don’t bet on the race- the field is much too large. Unless you like trifectas with random numbers.

  3. contraryguy - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:15 PM

    I’ve basically done this amount of mileage on a similar trip (starting from Columbus), but Cooperstown was in the middle of it, not the end. There are very few hotel rooms in that area (incl. Oneonta), and I wouldn’t recommend a plan to stay the night there.

    And no visit to Cooperstown should skip a visit to the Ommegang brewery, few miles south of town. Small but interesting operation.

    • pharmerbrown - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:24 PM

      I was just thinking about Ommegang. That place is awesome. I feel like you could cover the hall with 1 afternoon, and would be better informed if you watched Ken Burns’ series first. But few American brewers do Belgian better than Ommegang.

  4. justinreds - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:19 PM

    I have been to Wrigleyville, the Louisville Slugger factory, and Cooperstown. The only thing I havent done is make the 90 minute drive up I-71 to buy you a beer Craig. Challenge Accepted!

  5. ianrbarbo - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:19 PM

    Whoever thinks Wrigleyville is the best neighborhood in baseball should sign a year-long lease behind the McDonalds across from Wrigley…Like i stupidly did in 2007-08. Woops!

  6. stlouis1baseball - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:21 PM

    I am fortunate to live within a (5 – 5 1/2) hour drive of (8) MLB parks. You talk about a neat roadtrip.
    Eight parks within (5 – 5 1/2) hours. A whole lotta’ Baseball.

  7. WhenMattStairsIsKing - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:26 PM

    Wrigleyville is good in terms of a lot of local spots dedicated to the Cubs. It’s not good for all the douchebags that go to the local bars though – especially Barleycorn, Cubby Bear and Rebel. It’s getting too flashy over there, too.

    I live a mile and a half away from there – and I was out there for drinks recently, for the first time in several months.

  8. JB (the original) - Apr 30, 2012 at 1:49 PM

    Being in the Twin Cities it makes it a little harder to do a “long weekend” roadtrip that far east, but I have done the Beloit (Twins Class A team), Milwaukee, Chicago (whoever’s in town) trifecta a couple times by taking a Friday or Monday off. Haven’t managed to squeeze 4 in yet do to my and baseball’s schedules, but someday.

  9. roadwearyaaron - Apr 30, 2012 at 3:21 PM

    So since I also live in Columbus, do you buy the beer?

  10. dparker713 - Apr 30, 2012 at 5:51 PM

    Our patronage allows someone to work in from their mother’s basement in their PJs. So who owes who a beer?

  11. jlovenotjlo - May 1, 2012 at 1:55 AM

    Wrigleyville the best baseball neighborhood? If you’re into former and current frat guys parading around in an overly-crowded and extremely loud bar. I’ve never been up there during a Cubs game, but Friday and Saturday nights are the pits. I should also mention that you’ll be lucky to meet or come across anyone that is, you know, FROM Chicago, something that should probably constitute a good baseball neighborhood.

    I have spent time in 7 baseball neighborhoods, and I have enjoyed the area around Coors Field in Denver the most. For the love of God it just cannot be Wrigleyville.

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