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And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

May 1, 2012, 5:56 AM EST

Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish gestures to fans during their MLB American League baseball game in Toronto

Rangers 4, Blue Jays 1: I think it’s safe to say that, after a couple of rocky starts to begin the year, Yu Darvish is starting to get comfortable. He struck out nine Blue Jays while giving up a single run in seven innings. The homer was by the incredibly hot Edwin Encarnacion, who has gone long in four straight games. He hit this one two innings after getting hit by Darvish.

Brewers 8, Padres 3: Ryan Braun hit three homers, one of which landed on the top deck of the Western Metal Supply Co. down the left-field line at Petco, which is a serious poke, especially for a night game in San Diego when it’s around 60 degrees. He also socked a triple. Mercy.

Red Sox 11, Athletics 6: Darn. I thought Sunday’s loss would send them off on some new, horrible, drama-filled losing streak but wouldn’t you know it, the Red Sox bounce back and win their seventh of eight. Dammit, it looks like we need another narrative besides “the Red Sox are doomed!” Maybe Clay Buchholz still is, as he gave up six run on seven hits in six and two-thirds. But Tommy Milone had it worse.

Rays 3, Mariners 2:  Tampa Bay rallied in the 11th and the 12th. Evan Longoria and Miguel Olivo each left the game early with injuries, but each of their replacements on defense — Elliot Johnson and Jesus Montero — had big hits.

Phillies 6, Cubs 4: A four-run first inning wasn’t all the Phillies needed — Placido Polanco broke a tie in the eighth with a two-run double — but it was a good start. Vance Worley allowed one run over seven but didn’t get the win thanks to a Chad Qualls give-up-a-tying-homer-and-then-hang-around-for-the-offense-to-pick-me-up vulture job.

Yankees 2, Orioles 1: Hiroki Kuroda outduels Jason Hammel. A 2:22 Yankees game. You don’t see a ton of those.

Pirates 9, Braves 3: It’s been a while since the Bucco’s bats did anything decent, but they went off last night. Pedro Alvarez and Yamaico Navarro each went yard. It was the first time all year that they had scored more than five in a game.

Astros 4, Mets 3: A Jed Lowrie RBI single broke a 3-3 tie in the eighth. The Astros used seven pitchers to get through this one even though their starter went six and two-thirds innings. That’s not something you see every day.

Diamondbacks 9, Marlins 5: Patrick Corbin won his major league debut.  Cody Ransom and Justin Upton hit two-run homers. The Marlins have lost eight of nine and the home crowds are booing. Or maybe they weren’t booing. Maybe they were just saying “Boo-uehrle, Boo-uehrle …”

Angels 4, Twins 3: Torii Hunter was 3 for 4 with a homer and three driven in. C.J. Wilson cruised into the eighth where he ran into a bit of trouble but still picked up his third win.

Rockies 6, Dodgers 2: Matt Kemp homered again — that’s 12 already — but the Dodgers didn’t do much more against Juan Nicasio, who scattered nine hits and allowed only two runs to the previously-hot Dodgers.

Royals vs. Tigers: POSTPONED: April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring. Dull roots with spring rain. And Yuniesky. He was stirred too, I imagine.

  1. royhobbs39 - May 1, 2012 at 6:25 AM

    You just penned the new Sox narrative: What has Bobby V done to Buckholz?

  2. btwicey - May 1, 2012 at 6:31 AM

    Yu. Beast. Braun. Beast. Kemp. Beast.

  3. phillyphreak - May 1, 2012 at 6:37 AM

    Stir-oyids. Amirite?

    • kopy - May 1, 2012 at 9:18 AM

      Nope.

  4. kranepool - May 1, 2012 at 6:53 AM

    Brad Mills was audtioning for a role on the new reality show “The Next Tony LaRussa” as he tried using 6 different pitchers for 6 different batters, Mills said after the game he was trying to show the Astros fans what it will be like when the Astros become contenders again but the sad truth is Mills will be long gone from the Houston dugout when that occurs

    • stex52 - May 1, 2012 at 8:40 AM

      I expect that he was a little too quick on the trigger after being too slow to make good changes on Sunday. They threw away a win against the Reds; I think he was desperate to keep it from happening again.

      I am still undecided about Mills. He was dealt a very bad hand when he took the job. His reputation is that he is good with the young players. I am feeling uncomfortable right now about whether he can handle his pitchers.

  5. Ari Collins - May 1, 2012 at 8:02 AM

    Should have saved that rain recap for a Rays game, when you could have referenced a Mr. T.S. Elliot Johnson.

  6. dwrek5 - May 1, 2012 at 8:59 AM

    Face it Craig, Chad Qualls knows how to win. He did what he had to do to get the W.

    • Jonny 5 - May 1, 2012 at 9:11 AM

      If a win was a an object, Qualls should have handed it to Worley last night.

      So, when can we call W/L a team stat and stop fooling around calling it a pitching stat?

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - May 1, 2012 at 9:13 AM

        Pretty sure Klaw penned the death knell for pitching wins back on 9/21/10 in this article

        http://insider.espn.go.com/mlb/insider/columns/story?columnist=law_keith&id=5599365

      • Jonny 5 - May 1, 2012 at 9:21 AM

        Nobody understands this more than the Phillies pitching staff. Well, besides Felix H. anyway.

      • natstowngreg - May 1, 2012 at 1:34 PM

        And the Nats rotation. Gio should be sent down for giving up 2 whole runs Sunday. He should know by now that he might get zero run support, so he needed to keep pitching those scoreless innings.

  7. uyf1950 - May 1, 2012 at 9:08 AM

    Maybe just maybe the Yankees starting pitchers are starting to come around. Moving Garcia out of the rotation and with CC’s and Kuroda’s last outings (combined 15 innings 3 ER’s) the Yankees can kick it into gear. Although I’m still waiting for Tex and Cano to show up offensively this season.

    • Panda Claus - May 1, 2012 at 10:07 AM

      Nope. The Orioles lineup rarely makes anybody’s ERA go up. Don’t be fooled by one game.

  8. pw38 - May 1, 2012 at 9:37 AM

    I’m trying to be realistic here about Yu and let the season play out before saying he’s arrived but man is he starting to look good. He has such good movement on his pitches I wonder if the league’s gonna need more than a few outings against him to try to figure it out. He definitely has good stuff and knows how to get himself out of jams. I’m impressed to say the least.

  9. Old Gator - May 1, 2012 at 9:53 AM

    No, they were booing. The fresh booted three behind Buehrle yesterday. Their scrbbies hit two dingers and they scored five but shot themselves in the ass with their Three Stooges fielding anyway.

    Meanwhile Fido, our odd, fuzzy new puppy with the Bryce Harper hairdo, came in from the yard yesterday with something in his mouth and climbed up to his favorite spot in the corner by the ceiling with it. We figured it was just another episode of puppy coprophagia but when he finally got bored with itand dropped it on top of the armoire it turned out to be something like a potato chip with feathers on it. When I get back to Macondo I’m going over to S-Mart to see if they have any more treaties like that.

  10. bravojawja - May 1, 2012 at 9:55 AM

    Isn’t it possible for the official scorer (or whoever) to assign the Win to the pitcher who pitched well? I think that happened within the last few years — the W went to a reliever who didn’t stink up the joint even though he wasn’t in line for it. Not that this would have worked in the Phillies game last night, but still.

    There should at least be a rule that the player who blows the lead/save can’t get the Win. If you have to, go back to the starter for the W. Then again, why assign the Win at all? There are plenty of games without a Save, why not a game without a Win?

  11. APBA Guy - May 1, 2012 at 11:14 AM

    Buchholz earned every bit of his 1.90+ WHIP last night, hurling the ball outside the zone in a sort of Anti-Colon movement all his own. But he at least has major league caliber stuff, allowing him to Houdini his way out of inning after inning with multiple baserunners until the 7th. No mention that he had a 2-2 count on Crisp, fired strike 3 on the inside corner, a strike which was ignored by Phil Cuzzi. Five runs later, Buchholtz exits, no longer Houdini. Major league pitchers have to overcome blown calls, fielding mistakes, etc.. But Buchholz, already living on the edge, couldn’t find a way out of the 7th.

    Tommy Milone, the incarnation of all that is Moyer, also received his due from a Grateful Red Sox nation last night, as his mushball repertoire was treated with the respect it deserves by first Ortiz, then the entire rest of the lineup. I have a feeling this will happen again. And again. You have to actually be Moyer to survive with stuff topping out at 88 and sitting 85. Command must be absolute. Even then, quality hitters will punish you. It’s one thing to fare well with that stuff against Seattle. But don’t bring that to Boston. Especially when you are missing your spots.

    • mornelithe - May 1, 2012 at 4:40 PM

      The movement on his curve was pretty damn vicious last night, that’s for sure. He really just needs to tighten up on his control (ergo, get a handle on walks).

  12. DJ MC - May 1, 2012 at 4:07 PM

    In case anyone is curious, the last time the Yankees played a game in 2:22 or less was last July 10, when they beat the Rays 1-0 in 2:11. They played a game against the White Sox in the same time in April (yep, Buehrle pitched), and a seven-inning game on August 2 in 1:59 (obviously that doesn’t count).

    The Red Sox had one on April 11, losing 3-1 to Toronto in 2:13, and three last season.

    This was already the third game this year that the Orioles played in 2:22 or less.

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