Skip to content

Oblique strain sends Matt Carpenter to disabled list

May 23, 2012, 3:22 PM EDT

San Diego Padres v St. Louis Cardinals Getty Images

Another day, another Cardinal on the disabled list.

Matt Carpenter left last night’s game with a strained oblique muscle and the Cardinals have placed him on the shelf, calling up Steven Hill from Triple-A to serve as a third catcher. Hill has also played some first base and outfield, so he could move around a bit off the bench.

Carpenter would have been in line for significant playing time at third base and first base, but instead his injury all but guarantees fellow rookie Matt Adams will be an everyday player while the Cardinals wait to hear exactly how long Lance Berkman will be out following knee surgery.

Before the injury Carpenter hit .282 with three homers and an .875 OPS in 39 games after finally getting his first extended chance in the majors at age 26.

  1. bigleagues - May 23, 2012 at 3:27 PM

    Well at least Wainwright hasn’t been on the DL yet this year . . .

  2. WhenMattStairsIsKing - May 23, 2012 at 3:29 PM

    Too many hurt players out there. Talk about an o-BLEAK situation.

    • ajcardsfan - May 23, 2012 at 3:33 PM

      Oh you’re so punny

      • WhenMattStairsIsKing - May 23, 2012 at 3:59 PM

        I try not to strain for them too much.

  3. thefalcon123 - May 23, 2012 at 3:30 PM

    Somehow, improbably, the Cardinals are now playing their 4th(!) option at 1st base. If Matt Adams goes down, I guess Kyle Lohse will have to play there on his off days.

    God speed Mr. Adams.

    • ramsfan1818 - May 24, 2012 at 12:59 PM

      Actually, 6 Cardinals have played 1st base this year:
      Adams
      Yadi
      Matt Carp
      Puma
      Craig
      Descalso

      They did bring up Steve Hill to back up Adams. So, there may be a 7th that plays 1st base in the first two months of the year…crazy.

  4. ajcardsfan - May 23, 2012 at 3:33 PM

    At the rate we’re going, Saint Louis is slowly becoming Memphis. I’ll allow this only if we’re allow to call up Beale Street and put it by Soulard

  5. Nick C - May 23, 2012 at 3:37 PM

    “… finally getting his first extended chance in the majors at age 26.”

    Aaron – The implication here is that Carpenter has been languishing in the minors. The reality is that he was drafted in 2009 as a 23 year old. Carpenter redshirted during his college career (TCU) because of Tommy John surgery. Thus he was a 5th year senior when drafted.

    The net result is that Carpenter spent about 2 and 2/3 seasons in the minors. That is a relatively quick path from draft to MLB.

    • Nick C - May 23, 2012 at 4:19 PM

      I am just curious about the thumbs down. Is it because I challenged Aaron about his implication? Is it because I concluded that 2-2/3 seasons is a quick path to the majors? I am genuinely curious.

      • paperlions - May 23, 2012 at 4:26 PM

        I wouldn’t worry about it Nick. Some jackhole will thumbs down just about anything.

        I agree with your observation, it was an inaccurate characterization (this isn’t a LaHair situation). Similarly, saying that Hamels changed his story and said that he didn’t hit Harper on purpose is inaccurate. Hamels said he didn’t do “it” on purpose….the “it” was stirring the pot…not hitting Harper. He meant to hit Harper, he just didn’t think it would have such broad repercussions. He never said hitting Harper was accidental.

      • Nick C - May 23, 2012 at 4:32 PM

        paper – I’m not worried about it. I’m just curious. I don’t really care “what” people think but I am curious about “how” people think.

      • pharmerbrown - May 23, 2012 at 4:54 PM

        I thumbs-downed it because I disagree with your assessment that Aaron’s comment implied that he languished anywhere. What Aaron stated was factual and concise. Lots of ballplayers spend careers in the minors, never getting called up… I don’t see anything wrong with being called up at 26, whether or not injured during college. To be called up, at any age, does not state that the player is lazy, unmotiviated, or unsuitable for the promotion, but rather the opposite. Its like the arguement over whether someone is a first-ballot HoF’er… He’s there, does it matter how many times some cranks had to vote about it?

        And I thumbs-downed paper, too. That was just for spite ;)

      • pharmerbrown - May 23, 2012 at 4:55 PM

        I thumbs-downed it because I disagree with your assessment that Aaron’s comment implied that he languished anywhere. What Aaron stated was factual and concise. Lots of ballplayers spend careers in the minors, never getting called up… I don’t see anything wrong with being called up at 26, whether or not injured during college. To be called up, at any age, does not state that the player is lazy, unmotiviated, or unsuitable for the promotion, but rather the opposite. Its like the argument over whether someone is a first-ballot HoF’er… He’s there, does it matter how many times some cranks had to vote about it?

        And I thumbs-downed paper, too. That was just for spite ;)

      • paperlions - May 23, 2012 at 5:06 PM

        He spent 3 years in the minors, only 2011 was in AAA. There is nothing “finally” about his chance to play in the majors. “Finally” in that context, implies a long wait. No such wait existed. He moved through the minors at a pretty quick pace for a guy taken in the 13 round.

        Words mean thing, and if you are going to earn your living by them (e.g. as a blogger), then you should learn to use them to convey proper meaning. In this case, the author either did a poor job of conveying information or was not aware of the proper information to begin with.

        In other news, the final game of the Cardinal-Padre series is FINALLY going to be played tonight.

      • Nick C - May 23, 2012 at 5:59 PM

        pharmer – Thanks for the explanation. As paper indicated I was challenging the word “finally” as if he had spent a long time in the minors. That Carpenter is getting his first chance at age 26 is not a reflection of spending a long time in the minors but rather a reflection of his advanced age when drafted. For most players age 26 would indicate a long stretch in the minors. I am not saying that is a bad or good thing. I was just pointing out that Aaron probably isn’t aware of Carpenter’s background and is assuming a long minor league stint based solely upon his age.

      • forsch31 - May 23, 2012 at 8:50 PM

        @pharmer–actually, as paperlion pointed out, what Aaron wrote was very inaccurate. Carpenter’s the very definition of an aggressively pushed prospect. After being drafted in 2009, he went through three levels of Single A ball the rest of the season, finishing in Palm Beach (St. Louis’s High A club) with 32 games. In 2010, he started in Palm Beach, but was promoted to Double A after just 28 games. He spent most of 2011 in Memphis (Triple A) minus a brief injury-fill-in call-up when Freese went down, and then he made the St. Louis roster out of spring training as the primary back-up at third (where he played in the minors) and a bench player for first and the corner spots in the outfield. Every year, Carpenter moved up at least one level, and he hasn’t “spent his career in the minors”; he’s actually spent a very short time in the minors.

        Aaron’s mistake is exactly that–just a bit of miswording that gives the wrong impression. It’s something that a copy editor would have caught, but bloggers don’t have editors. That’s the devil you get.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

This was 'the perfect baseball game'
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. G. Springer (3890)
  2. I. Davis (2942)
  3. C. Kimbrel (2822)
  4. B. Harper (2754)
  5. M. Machado (2692)
  1. M. Cuddyer (2648)
  2. C. Granderson (2491)
  3. J. Chavez (2392)
  4. J. Reyes (2334)
  5. K. Calhoun (2234)