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Roger Clemens acquitted on all charges

Jun 18, 2012, 4:54 PM EST

Roger Clemens

All those tax dollars and all those weeks of a trial equaled Roger Clemens being acquitted on all charges this afternoon.

And of course absolutely no one should be surprised.

Clemens was charged with six counts of perjury for denying to Congress in 2008 that he took steroids. His trial involved nearly two months of testimony from more than 40 witnesses, including Clemens’ wife and Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, and the overall case stretched over two years.

What a colossal waste of time, money, and energy.

  1. eddiecrash1976 - Jun 18, 2012 at 11:35 PM

    So when does the Lance Armstrong trial begin? Here’s me guessing there’s some genius who’s pushing for that just to fill his egotistical orgasms and wasting tax payer money. I can already see it now, c’mon, he’s pushing 40. Let’s do face it no one’s scorching for porn no more. No more frequent flyer bitch miles for my boy Peck. How’s a G8 and lots of money? Big d!@k player, swinging passed your knees.

  2. bozosforall - Jun 18, 2012 at 11:45 PM

    Look at all of the Boston crybabies bitter that Roger made them look like idiots again. Stick to bashing those who actually tested positive…like David Ortiz. Now there is a liar if I ever saw one, still denying using PEDs, even though the test didn’t lie. Roger wins over Boston yet again.

  3. badintent - Jun 19, 2012 at 12:04 AM

    Gary Sheffield said he used the same “Flaxseed cream” that Bonds used, because he got it directly from Bonds when he spent a winter working out with him. Gary was pissed when he found out from the media the cream was roids. H e realized he got played by Barry. I believe Gary over Bonds “Andre the Giant’s head” and Roger “the Dodger” any day. But for the Sox haters, us Yankee fans thank roger for his all his fine pitching in the World Series, playoffs and many seasons.

  4. grudenthediva - Jun 19, 2012 at 8:29 AM

    “2. Sports and politics shouldnt mix”

    I love how this episode has become a chic way of bashing the government, their prosecutors, etc. for, oh I don’t know, following the law. News flash: the involvement in steroids has less to do with sport and more to do with the fact that it involves a federal crime. Here’s a tip – U.S.C isn’t another way of referencing the Trojans or Gamecocks.

    Also, it’s hilarious to hear the “waste of time/better things to worry about” lines….predictable, but hilarious. Just because you can barely form a coherent thought whilst scratching your balls doesn’t mean that a cadre of prosecutors can’t handle one controversy, while other attorneys or elected officials handle their respective cases, committees, and constituents. Not everyone is incapable of multitasking.

    Guess you just want selective prosecution then? Is it only okay to follow the law when it’s not your guy/political party or when the vast breadth of your legal knowledge deems it worthy? Wonderful precedent, there. For all we know, you types would be the first to cry about preferential treatment the next time one of these high profile cases fails to see the courtroom.

    Save your “outrage” for the real criminals and thieves who get coddled, pardoned or elected without so much as an investigation. Just because Clemens didn’t get convicted doesn’t mean the prosecutors weren’t doing their job (aka, following the letter of the law about which a great deal of you know squat).

  5. prrbrr - Jun 19, 2012 at 1:27 PM

    They should go after his wife!

  6. klownboy - Jun 20, 2012 at 9:04 PM

    Clemens may have been declared innocent, but he is guilty of sheer stupidity…

    http://wp.me/p1gCK6-pk

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