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Rangers, Rockies on pace for historic finishes

Jul 2, 2012, 2:36 PM EDT

Nelson Cruz, Josh Hamilton, Michael Young

With two teams already there and the rest set to hit the halfway point of the season within the next few days, I wanted to look at what kind of pace each team was on. Below are the number of wins each team would finish with given its current pace, plus how that would stack up against the team’s history. As things stand now, there’s one team on pace for its most wins ever and another on pace for its fewest.

AL East
Yankees – 100 – most since 2009
Orioles – 87 – most since 1997
Red Sox – 86  – fewest since 2001
Rays – 84 – fewest since 2009
Blue Jays – 82 – most since 2010

AL Central
White Sox – 86 – most since 2010
Indians – 83 – most since 2007
Tigers – 80 – fewest since 2008
Royals – 74 – most since 2008
Twins – 69 – most since 2010

AL West
Rangers – 101 – most ever
Angels – 90 – most since 2009
Athletics – 77 – most since 2010
Mariners – 68 – most since 2009

NL East
Nationals – 95 – most since 1979*
Mets – 87 – most since 2008
Braves – 85 – fewest since 2008
Marlins – 79 – most since 2010
Phillies – 72 – fewest since 2000

NL Central
Reds – 89 – most since 2010
Pirates – 87 – most since 1992
Cardinals – 84 – fewest since 2007
Brewers – 75 – fewest since 2006
Astros – 66 – most since 2010
Cubs – 60 – fewest since 1981**

NL West
Giants – 91 – most since 2010
Dodgers – 89 – most since 2009
Diamondbacks – 81 – fewest since 2010
Rockies – 62 – fewest ever
Padres – 61 fewest since 1993

*The Expos were 74-40 and on pace to win 105 games when the strike ended the 1994 season.

**The 1981 Cubs went 38-65 in that strike-shortened season, which also works out to 60-win pace. Their last full season under 60 wins was 1966, when they went 59-103.

If the Rangers keep at it, they’ll set a franchise high for victories for the second straight year, topping last year’s total of 96. Before that, their high was 95 win sin 1999.

The Rockies are on pace for their fewest wins, excluding the 1994 strike season (they were on pace for 73 wins that year). Their low total is 67 wins, from both their inaugural season in 1993 and from 2005.

The Yankees and Rangers are both on pace for 100 wins. Only one team, the Phillies, got there last year. No team did in 2010. If the Yankees can do it, it’d be their sixth 100-win season since 1998.

And then there’s the Pirates, on pace for their first .500 season since Barry Bonds left. Their high total since was 79 wins in 1997.

  1. jimbo1949 - Jul 2, 2012 at 2:42 PM

    “*The Expos were 74-40 and on pace to win 105 games when the strike ended the 2004 season.”
    And that’s news to me. STSF

    • Matthew Pouliot - Jul 2, 2012 at 2:45 PM

      Whoops.

    • number42is1 - Jul 2, 2012 at 3:27 PM

      im usually pretty good at this… but for the life of me i cannot figure out or find what STSF means…

      • ajcardsfan - Jul 2, 2012 at 4:34 PM

        According to google’s search results it stands for “Star Trek Simulation Forum” so HBT is going through some odd changes if that’s the case

      • jimbo1949 - Jul 2, 2012 at 5:51 PM

        Shouldn’t type so fast.

      • Utley's Hair - Jul 2, 2012 at 7:04 PM

        Would that make Craig Picard—you know, with the hair…or lack of hair?

  2. uyf1950 - Jul 2, 2012 at 2:57 PM

    Matthew in the case of the Yankees I think it’s the most since 2009. The Yankees won 103 in 2009 and only I say only 95 in 2010.

    • Matthew Pouliot - Jul 2, 2012 at 3:03 PM

      You’re right. Thanks for the fix!

      • skids003 - Jul 2, 2012 at 5:01 PM

        Good article. Very interesting.

  3. vanmorrissey - Jul 2, 2012 at 3:09 PM

    And why does Tracy still have a job?

    • tuloisgod - Jul 2, 2012 at 6:16 PM

      Quite frankly, Tracy isn’t the problem (OK, the four-man, 75-pitch-limit rotation is a bit dumb). I mean, it’s not as if his managerial decisions have been costing the Rockies games. Talent — or the lack thereof — has been costing them games. That stinking pile lands right at the feet of GM Dan O’Dowd, who couldn’t identify good pitching if Bob Gibson himself knocked him down with a high hard one. The list of former Rockies pitchers who have gone on to greener pastures is significant, including Jason Hammel, Houston Street and Ubaldo Jimenez just the past year. The list of busts in the draft has been huge. And the list of dumb experiments is unfathomable. I mean, seriously, did anyone actually think that 49-year-old, missed-all-of-last-season Jamie Moyer was actually going to help this staff? Jeff Francis? And Jeremy Guthrie has been atrocious. But team owner Dick Monfort insists that O’Dowd is “the best GM in baseball.” I guess that a team’s record (and not just this season — for all 10!) has no bearing on how we measure a GM’s value, according to Monfort.

  4. dondada10 - Jul 2, 2012 at 3:37 PM

    Two points:
    1. I didn’t realize the Twins had been flounder that past couple of seasons (N.L. fan here)
    2. Wow, the NL Central sucks.

    • Jeremy T - Jul 2, 2012 at 4:44 PM

      AL Central is pretty embarrassing, too, although the NL has a slightly worse bottom end.

  5. pipkin42 - Jul 2, 2012 at 5:25 PM

    66 is the Astros’ most since 2010. I know it’s only two years, but still. Yeesh.

    And they’ll probably dump some guys if they can, which means they might get worse.

  6. borderline1988 - Jul 3, 2012 at 3:11 PM

    Has there ever been a year in which every team in a division finished above .500?

    If there were ever a time to split up the AL East, now’s probably it. They easily have 5 of baseball’s top 15 teams.

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