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Criticism of Joe Girardi has reached PalinFey levels of ridiculousness

Aug 10, 2012, 10:31 AM EDT

Palin Fey

Don’t know what “PalinFey” is?  Read on, my friends, read on.

It’s always been strange to see the New York media go after Joe Girardi for use of actual information to inform his decisions. Things like scouting reports, statistics and stuff. You know, the things smart managers have always done. Except Girardi dared organize his information into a binder, so that apparently makes him weird.  Never mind that he has a World Series ring and has won the manager of the year award. He’s a crazy, pencil neck geek! Binderboy!

That line has now gone beyond self-parody thanks to Wallace Matthews of ESPN New York, who just loved the fact that Girardi got angry and argued a call yesterday, leading to his ejection.  Here’s Matthews’ lead-in:

For once, he wasn’t “G.I. Joe” or “Joey Looseleafs” or “Binder Boy,” the guy who is on autopilot in front of a reporter, and at the mercy of his splits, his spray charts and his heat maps in the privacy of the manager’s office.

For the five minutes or so that he shouted at, gestured at and lectured the umpires on the field at Comerica Park, culminated by a stage exit complete with waving arms and rolling eyeballs, he was a living, passionate, fire-breathing human being.

King Kaufman has coined a term called “PalinFey.” It refers to Tina Fey’s impression of Sarah Palin, and it describes a parody that is essentially indistinguishable from the real thing. It sort of renders the parody superfluous, because you really can’t outdo the reality for pure silliness.

When it comes to Boston reporters describing the Red Sox disarray and New York reporters going after Girardi’s binder, I think we’ve reached a perfect state of PalinFey.

  1. southpaw2k - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:36 AM

    Wouldn’t calling it “Feylin” be better? I think it rolls off the tongue more easily.

    • Old Gator - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:32 PM

      Tina could have done a great routine on the Glenn Rice episode. Then she could have called it Poleinfay.

  2. carlosologist - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:39 AM

    Didn’t know that being prepared for work is equivalent to ridicule. ESPN-NY is a joke.

    • chill1184 - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:49 AM

      “Didn’t know that being prepared for work is equivalent to ridicule. ESPN is a joke.”

      Fixed for you

      • protius - Aug 11, 2012 at 4:51 AM

        WTG

    • saints97 - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:49 AM

      People on this site ripped Tony LaRussa apart for it unmercifully, including Craig. It has nothing to do with preparedness or making informed decisions, it all just boils down to whether or not you like the guy. If you like him, you defend him. If you don’t, you pan him. This is Journalism 101, and bloggers are not above it either.

      • Craig Calcaterra - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:58 AM

        I don’t think you’ll fine one example of me ever ripping La Russa for his preparedness or for his overall managerial acumen, which I have described as him being the best manager in the past 50 years on multiple occasions.

        I have ripped La Russa for his ego. And his imperiousness. And his occasional dishonesty. And I have said that he had a habit of overmanaging, which is undeniable.

        But I don’t know of anyone who has ever ripped La Russa simply for being prepared to do his job.

      • paperlions - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:25 AM

        LaRussa frustrated me as a fan, but even I (who has probably ripped TLR more than all other HBT posters) have never complained about TLR’s level of preparedness.

      • skids003 - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:50 PM

        Craig, I’m disappointed in you. I thought you were a Braves fan. Bobby Cox is the best manager of the last 50 years.

      • stlouis1baseball - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:59 PM

        Paper is right Saints97. He busted TLR’s balls more than anyone. To the point of me fully believing he was making shit up. But preparation was NOT something you could fault TLR for. And yes Paper…I truly believe you made most of that shit up. Hahaha!

    • Stacey - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:26 AM

      ESPN NY’s coverage of the Yankees is awful. Wally Matthews and Andrew Marchand are the worst.

    • djpostl - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:59 PM

      Wallace Matthews is a joke. And a closet Red Sox fan/Yankees hater.

      After Kuroda’s first start of spring training he tried to inflame fear in the masses…all but writing him off as a bust.

      I found an awesome piece titled “Wallace Matthews Will Not Rest Until All Yankee Fans are Miserable” that sums it best.

      http://mystiqueandaura.com/2010/04/05/wallace-matthews-will-not-rest-until-all-yankee-fans-are-miserable/

  3. miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:43 AM

    To be fair, a lot of the criticism of Girardi’s management is warranted. The “binder” is just another way to get on Girardi for being all cute with his management style. For example, on opening day he decided to order his ace, CC Sabathia, to walk Sean Rodriguez to load the bases for Carlos Pena…with 2 outs…in the 1st inning.

    Stuff that defies logic like that example are what prompts the binder talk. His reliance on analysis is not the issue, it’s making the wrong decision after weighing all the info available to him. Naturally, Pena hit a grand slam in that case. Great way to start the season.

    • raysfan1 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:06 AM

      yes, it was a great way to start the season.

    • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:13 AM

      Carlos Pena is hitting .195. Yeah, he’s hit 15 HR in 389 AB’s. The rest of the time he sucks. I’ll take the binder for $400 please.

      • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:22 AM

        So you see no issue with walking Sean Rodriguez to load the bases in the 1st inning of the season with 2 outs with your Ace on the mound?

      • paperlions - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:27 AM

        Mike is right. Walking the bases loaded is always a bad idea….the only possible exception is a close game with the pitcher on deck with him guaranteed to stay in to hit….but even then it is probably poor game management as the 8th place hitter probably kind of sucks, and you get the pitcher to start the next inning and a leadoff out severely decreases a teams chances of scoring.

      • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:15 PM

        Your Ace can’t get a .195 hitter out? Some Ace.

      • raysfan1 - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:41 PM

        No argument, Natslady. The pleasure from Carlos.Pena was brief indeed. I’ve posted before that I’d really rather have someone more effective than Mario Mendoza at 1B. But I did enjoy that one moment.

      • APBA Guy - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:04 PM

        Really. And Pena’s split against lefties is even worse: .162 BA and .591 OPS. Which has been his story for the past few years. Sean Rodriguez had a higher BA and OPS vs. lefties by a significant amount last year, .273 BA and .864 OPS.

        Definitely the right decision to face Pena.

      • djpostl - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:04 PM

        The binder also said the guy you intentionally walked sucks, career slash line of .224/.299/.356/.655.

        He was the better choice to pitch to & it showed in the end result.

    • bigharold - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:56 AM

      “… he decided to order his ace, CC Sabathia, to walk Sean Rodriguez to load the bases for Carlos Pena…with 2 outs…”

      Because Pena had at the time a .114 BA with about 8 strike outs. Statistically it was a good gamble that just didn’t work.

      • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:18 PM

        Exactly. Live by the stats, die by ‘em. Pena hitting worse than 3 of 4 starting pitchers on our staff. All you need is a little tapper to the mound or a K, a popout, lots of chances (you did say 2 out, right?).

      • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:26 PM

        Uhh ever hear of a thing called sample sizes? If you’re going to use stats, try to use them correctly.

      • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:27 PM

        Also, by loading the bases you are increasing the likelihood of something going wrong. What’s the worst that Sean Rodriguez can do to you in that situation? 3 run homer. The worst that Pena can do? Grand slam. The Yanks ended up losing the game by one run. It was, and will always be, a poor decision based on flawed logic of relying on a statistically insignificant sample.

      • bigharold - Aug 11, 2012 at 1:27 AM

        “Uhh ever hear of a thing called sample sizes? If you’re going to use stats, try to use them correctly.”

        Actually, I was wrong; “Pena, who entered the at-bat batting .114 lifetime (4-for-35) against Sabathia, including 11 strikeouts and no hits in his most recent 14 at-bats, ..”

        Girardi made the right call but unless the layer executes the stats won’t help.

        “Also, by loading the bases you are increasing the likelihood of something going wrong.”

        No it doesn’t, .. it only impact the results if the player doesn’t execute. The bottom line is the strategy was sound, .. the execution was faulty.

    • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:24 PM

      Hey Natslady, you still haven’t said whether or not walking the bases loaded with 2 outs in the first inning of the season with your ace on the mound is a good decision.

      • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:28 PM

        How was I not clear??? Yes, it was a good decision. It didn’t work, but you should expect your Ace to be able to get Carlos Pena out when he has a chance at every base.

      • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:30 PM

        Pooh. By that logic you would never walk anyone intentionally because 8 innings later you might lose by exactly one run.

      • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:31 PM

        I would mostly agree with the logic of not walking people intentionally. And yes, you certainly don’t walk Sean Rodriguez intentionally to load the bases in the first inning.

      • hittfamily - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:11 PM

        Sean Rod has an .800 OPS vs lefthanders. Pena has a .650 OPS vs left handers. Pena hits .114 vs CC. Sean Rod hits .300+ vs lefthanders (at the time). I walk Sean Rod to get to pena 10 times out of 10 in that situation. Statisically, Pena makes an out 9 times out of 10. Sean Rod, 7 out of 10. It is a no brainer.

      • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:41 PM

        It’s the first inning the season and you’re intentionally walking a guy to load the bases with your best pitcher on the mound. How about let your best pitcher pitch?

        ALSO SAMPLE SIZE ISSUES.

    • protius - Aug 11, 2012 at 6:19 AM

      miketorrez:

      You wrote: “To be fair, a lot of the criticism of Girardi’s management is warranted.” If you were interested in offering fair criticism of Joe Girardi’s management skills, then why did you present the readers with unfair, unwarranted and absurd criticisms, based on nothing more than your uninformed opinion?

      For example, you wrote: “on opening day he (Girardi) decided to order his ace, CC Sabathia, to walk Sean Rodriguez to load the bases for Carlos Pena…with 2 outs…in the 1st inning.” Your criticism here is based solely on hindsight. Unless you can explain to the readers why you believe that it’s unreasonable for a manager to consult his reference material and conclude that the left-handed batter on deck has shown susceptibility to the slider from a left-handed pitcher, and is therefore a good candidate to either strikeout or ground out, then your critique has no value what so ever?

      Pẽna, at that point in his career, was only 4 for 35 against Sabathia, which is a .114 batting average against (Peter Kerasotis: The New York Times, April 6, 2012). What is it about Girardi’s common sense approach to baseball decision-making that you find so perplexing? Furthermore, what is it about Girardi’s “management style” that appears “cute” to you, and can you explain to the readers what “cute” is, and why it’s relevant to managing a baseball team?

      Girardi referencing Pẽna’s stats against Sabathia from his binder does not defy logic. What does defy logic; however, is that you can misrepresent common sense and common practice as unorthodox procedure, and then have the gall to malign Girardi’s decision after the fact.

      In sum, for your brand of critical thinking to have any validity, it must occur before Pẽna hits the ball, and not after.

      • miketorrez - Aug 12, 2012 at 1:52 PM

        “Cute” managing is intentionally walking the bases loaded in the first inning of the season to face a power hitter. Again, my point remains that it is not a logical move at that time because there is a greater chance of more runs scoring if you load the bases with two out than if you have only 2 on. It’s a simple concept.

        Also, your snarkiness aside, you can use critical thinking before Pena hits the ball and you still come out with it being the wrong move. Below are some sources that analyzed the move more in-depth:

        Here’s an interesting piece on the Yankees use of IBB over time from Pinstripe Alley. Key note from the game as well:
        “When Girardi opted to walk Rodriguez in front of Pena, he was expecting Sabathia to continue his dominance over the Rays’ first baseman. However, this wasn’t the late innings of a mid-season game. It was the first inning of the first game, and Sabathia had shown early signs of lacking command. Maybe if it had been later in the game, when Sabathia had a feel for all his pitches, the move would have made more sense, but in the opening frame, the big lefty didn’t appear to have his entire arsenal at his disposal. So, instead of dominating Pena with breaking balls, as he did later in the game, the Yankees’ ace was forced to rely on the fastball (10 of his first 13 pitches leading up to the walk were fastballs), and the Rays’ slugger made him pay.” http://www.pinstripealley.com/2012/4/7/2931988/intentional-fallacy-first-inning-free-pass-backfires-on-yankees

        The Replacement Level Yankees Blog has a good post on how Runs Expectancy “for pitching to Rodriguez with runners on second and third is lower than the RE for pitching to Pena with the bases loaded.”

        http://www.rlyw.net/index.php/RLYW/comments/was_intentionally_walking_sean_rodriguez_to_pitch_to_carlos_pena_in_the_fir/

        Also just for fun, here’s Craig commenting on the issue at the time: http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/04/06/great-moments-in-over-managing-joe-girardi-edition/

        I’m not arguing this anymore. Intentionally walking the bases loaded in the first inning of the season is a bad move especially with your ace on the mound. You have no margin for error in that situation and it backfired. It’s overmanaging…cute even.

      • protius - Aug 13, 2012 at 3:59 AM

        Sorry Torrez, but your response just doesn’t cut it. You have failed to address the central theme of my arguments.

        As I said in my original post to you, “Your criticism here is based solely on hindsight.”

        Gathering a list of like-minded thinkers to support your weak position does not adequately challenge my argument: “In sum, for your brand of critical thinking to have any validity, it must occur before Pẽna hits the ball, and not after.”

        All you’ve managed to do is assemble the insights of people who have all reasoned with information after the fact. Even the “Runs Expectancy” stats you hide behind are gathered after the fact.

        Now, I understand why your ego compels you to end the conversation on your terms, but you can’t run from the fact that your arguments, and the evidence you use to support your arguments, rely solely on hindsight for their validity.

        You hurl brickbats at Girardi for his forethought, while hiding behind a barricade of hindsight, and that’s not cute; it’s rather ugly.

      • miketorrez - Aug 13, 2012 at 10:22 AM

        Apparently you have an issue with reading. I did address your point re: “hindsight”. Girardi should have seen that Sabathia does not have command. That should have informed his decision. Read again:

        “Maybe if it had been later in the game, when Sabathia had a feel for all his pitches, the move would have made more sense, but in the opening frame, the big lefty didn’t appear to have his entire arsenal at his disposal. So, instead of dominating Pena with breaking balls, as he did later in the game, the Yankees’ ace was forced to rely on the fastball (10 of his first 13 pitches leading up to the walk were fastballs), and the Rays’ slugger made him pay.”

        Also the run expectancy information, which should be common sense, can be garnered before the at bat and should be taken into account. You risk giving up more runs loading the bases than you do facing Rodriguez with 2 on. Especially if you’re basing your analysis on a handful of at bats, which is what 35 at bats is. The fact that RLYW did the analysis after the fact is moot. The evidence is there beforehand.

        In any case, I’ve answered your questions and I can see I’m not going to change your flawed opinion. The decision remains flawed and the result showed why.

      • protius - Aug 14, 2012 at 12:17 AM

        Torrez:

        Clearly, you have many issues. The two most glaring; however, are reading comprehension and word definition.

        Hindsight: Also known as the knew-it-all-along effect or creeping determinism, is the inclination to see events that have already occurred as being more predictable than they were before they took place (Wikipedia). In your case, the know-it-all effect also applies. (I will see your snarkiness, and raise you three sarcasms.)

        You wrote: “Girardi should have seen that Sabathia does not have command. That should have informed his decision.” For your edification, the operative words here are “should have”.

        If you have to use the words “should have” in your explanation, that means you are relying on hindsight to inform your opinion, and if you insist on using information gleaned from past events, then it is clear that you have not addressed my arguments, because you obviously don’t understand them. What underscores my point is your unmistakable reference to what “should have” been done to avoid what happened.

        You also wrote: “Maybe if it had been later in the game, when Sabathia had a feel for all his pitches, the move would have made more sense.” This line of reasoning with information makes it clear that you are seeing “events that have already occurred as being more predictable than they were before they took place.”

        If you would be so kind, please explain to the readers why you think that Run Expectancy statistics, which are the product of after the fact events, should not be considered hindsight support material? You are engaging in a circular argument. Hindsight, supported by post facto information.

        Let me put my argument to you in the simplest terms: Can you compose an in-the-moment critique of Joe Girardi’s use of his binder information without any mention of past events, or “should have” and “maybe if” references, i.e., no hindsight? In addition, you must be able to support your arguments without using Run Expectancy statistics (Data that is compiled from past events).

        If you cannot, then you have not proved that Girardi’s decision was flawed, as you contend.

  4. danaking - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:47 AM

    Thanks to the Internet and MLB.tv, I am able to fully immerse myself in Pirates information, even though I now live in Maryland. The team has stunk for a long time, and this year’s outcome is still in doubt (though an end to the losing streak seems all but assured), but they’re a lot more fun to follow than the Yankees-Red Sox BS.

    I lived In Boston in the 80s for a few years and became a fan for a long time. lately they’ve become Yankees Light, both in how the team is run and how they’re treated by the local media, and that’s just not any fun.

    Beat ‘em Bucs!

    • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:22 PM

      I tell you, of all the teams in the NL with playoff chances, I LEAST want to meet the Pirates. Good luck to ya. Just, not too good.

  5. thefalcon123 - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:49 AM

    So…research, knowledge and informed decisions= Bad

    Ranting, anger= Good.

    There’s so much I just don’t know about baseball. Like how David Ortiz apparently doesn’t know how to hit as well in the 5th inning as he does the 9th.

    • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:45 AM

      Falcon-

      It applies to politics too.

  6. realgone2 - Aug 10, 2012 at 10:49 AM

    I do not know who is more annoying Tina Fey or Sarah Palin.

    • mrfloydpink - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:05 AM

      Let me help you with that. The answer is…Sarah Palin. There you go!

      • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:47 AM

        The funniest thing is Fey would probably be a better governor than Palin, and Palin is so naturally stupid and contradictory that she’d make a great comedienne (she wouldn’t realize she was funny though.)

    • paperlions - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:30 AM

      Palin quit her job as governor of a state so she could go on a self-promotion tour….and you aren’t sure who annoys you more? A person that abandons the state they lead….or a cute/funny/smart comedienne? Regardless of your politics, the answer should be pretty straight forward (even if you don’t live in Alaska).

    • bigharold - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:53 AM

      “..who is more annoying Tina Fey or Sarah Palin.”

      Here is a hint, .. one is a comedian that is suppose to make you laugh. And, the other is a an imbecile that was entirely unqualified for the position that she was attempting to attain. And, when that didn’t work out she abandoned the only important job she had to capitalize financially on her new found fame without actually having to actually know or do anything.

      • stlouis1baseball - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:32 PM

        “the other is an imbecile that was entirely unqualified for the position that she was attempting to attain.”
        Oh I see Harold.
        Quite similar to the community organizing 2 minute State Senator we currently have in office?
        The difference is…
        Palin was a State Governor (which means she has more qualifications in one hand than he has in his entire body).
        Disclaimer: I would NOT vote for her. I think she is a twit.
        I just think she is far more qualified than Barry.
        Of course…you are at least equally qualified as him Harold.

      • stercuilus65 - Aug 10, 2012 at 4:21 PM

        Fey is a comedian?

      • mrfloydpink - Aug 10, 2012 at 9:58 PM

        @stlouis1: Once again,. you prove yourself to be a nitwit and a jerk.

        To start, what is your professional or academic background that makes you such an expert in who is and is not qualified to be president? I suggest you examine the resume of some of our best presidents–say a Washington or a Lincoln. Then take a look at someone like James Buchanan, who came to the Oval Office with more experience than just about anyone and failed worse than just about anyone. The upshot: The presidency is such a unique job, there is no meaningful way to identify a candidate’s fitness for the job based on their previous political experience.

        Further, even if resume does matter, Palin had a term as mayor of a dinky little town and then served half a term as governor of a state with a tiny population. Obama had a term in the Illinois legislature, and a partial term in the U.S. Senate. Their relative level of political experience is not easy to compare, since one served in legislative roles while the other served in executive roles. But Obama certainly had FAR, FAR more constituents than Palin did, which probably tips the balance in his favor. Whatever the case may be, to suggest that Palin’s experience VASTLY outweighs Obama’s is laughable.

        Then, finally, there are the non-political elements of their resumes. Obama graduated from Columbia and Harvard Law. Palin went to FIVE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS before finally squeezing a degree out of upper northwestern Idaho Tech (or whatever podunk place she has a degree from). Obama worked as a college professor, lawyer, and community organizer. Palin was a TV news reporter and a soccer mom.

        And so I ask: In what world can one POSSIBLY argue that Sarah Palin was “far more qualified” to be President than Barack Obama?

        Furthermore, you do not not know Harold, nor are you familiar with his background. For all you know, he’s a three-term U.S. Senator or a Nobel Laureate. So your ad hominem attack on him is largely just an exercise in confirming what I said above, namely that you are an ass and a twit.

      • bigharold - Aug 12, 2012 at 12:04 AM

        “Palin was a State Governor (which means she has more qualifications in one hand than he has in his entire body).”

        What utter nonsense!! Palin was the Governor of a state that has about 600K people for less time than Obama was a US Senator. He was far more than a community organizer, .. and his ” .. 2 minute State Senator..” gig was actually from 1997 to 2004, .. about seven years, .. then he was a US Senator from 2004 to 2008. Not to mention he became a US Senator of a state with 12 million people. Big difference from the Mayor of some tiny town in Alaska AND Governor for two years of one of the least populous states in the union. And, don’t forget his Columbia and Harvard Law school education. And, last but not least, the stupidity that flows from her his astounding. If see looked like Madeleine Albright and said the idiotic things she says she wouldn’t even be taken serious.

        So yeah, Obama was head and shoulders better qualified if for no other reason Palin is an imbecile wholly unqualified.

        “I just think she is far more qualified than Barry.”

        You entitled to think whatever you like. Just like I don’t think you know what your taking about. Mostly because you got so many basic, known and easily corroborated facts completely wrong. If you don’t like him fine, .. but at least know what you’re talking about, .. have facts. Just don’t pull thing out of your ass and expect everybody to be as ignorant as you! Most aren’t.

      • stlouis1baseball - Aug 14, 2012 at 11:37 AM

        Harold:
        Please know I meant no dissrespect whatsoever (apparently Mr. Floyd feels I have somehow insulted you). Personally, I feel to be President one should have previously held the position of State Governor (at a minimum). As a result, when you questioned Palin’s qualifications I (personally) felt it was incredibly ironic considering we have (in my opinion) a President who has done nothing more than serve the role of Community Organizer and 2 minute Senator. His law degree(s) and teaching positions mean absolutely nothing to me (as they relate to the office of the Presidency anyway). There are a great number of bird-brained Lawyers and Professors who have absolutely zero qualifications to be President. So again…his law degrees and teaching positions mean nothing (to me personally) as they relate to his qualifcations to be President.
        When I said you are at least equally qualified as him…I meant it.
        Hell…this would include myself as well. Unless you have served as State Governor.
        If so…you are more qualified than him (in my opinion).
        In a nutshell…I am not in love with the Man like a lot of people (mostly under the age of 30). I don’t believe he is the be all-end all. To put it crudely…I don’t believe the sun rises and sets in his ass. I could care less how “cool” or “hip” or “trendy” it makes people feel to have him as President. Cool, hip and trendy don’t get the job done. I am NOT better off than I was four years ago. The Man won’t even debate his record as President. His “accomplishments” if you will. He will NOT touch them. That also makes me question the job he has done as President and the job he will do (if God forbid) he does get re-elected.

    • jimeejohnson - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:30 PM

      Failin’ Pailin quit because she couldn’t bear to be investigated for unscrupulous acts. Palin is a model of Conservative hypocrisy, but does have amazing eyesight: she claimed she could see Russia from her backyard in Alaska. All Tina Fey did was bring the joke that is 6-pack Palin to the masses.

    • stlouis1baseball - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:33 PM

      Let me help you with that. The answer is…Tina Fey. There you go!
      And on the bright side…Palin is about 10 times hotter. Still annoying…just way hotter.

      • psousa1 - Aug 15, 2012 at 4:45 PM

        Tina Fey does have that sexy librarian thing going on………………

    • protius - Aug 11, 2012 at 6:30 AM

      Tine Fey, without question.

      It is the job of a humorist to make the mundane appear funny; thus any professional comedian can successfully satirize any politician.

      The degree of humor/laughter derived is directly related to the viewer’s political orientation

  7. Ben - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:00 AM

    This is one of Baudrillard’s key ideas (if you can get through the obscurantism)–the idea that modern technologies of representation make possible a slippage from the real to the simulation of the real, where the simulation becomes the real. Umberto Eco probably put it best when he described the problem of simulacrum as “the authentic fake.” It’s certainly an improvement over Horkheimer and Adorno’s argument in “Dialectic of Enlightenment” by providing something of a phenomenology of late capitalism. I’m not sure that makes the simulacra any less silly though.

    • cur68 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:53 AM

      Ben: I never thought I’d ready any of that on a baseball blog. A “+ thumb” for you. Just to extend all of that (in slightly less impenetrable language) I’d just like to revel a bit in the rare and beautiful moments when the fake is more worthy, valuable, desirable, or in some intrinsic way, better than the original. In the world of stamp forgery such things happen. There are many, many highly sought after fakes that, due to circumstance, artist, or use (in some cases all 3), have grown beyond the worth of that which they copied. In even a cursory examination of the lives of Ms. Fey and Mrs. Palin I do believe we have another fine example. In fact, to anchor this little theory to the originally cited Baudrillard concept, that of technology enhancing the effect of the simulation, we can say that without modern marketing, TV, internet access, or many other modern technologically derived effects there is no Sarah Palin (a fine simulation of a politician) as we know her (which neatly ties in to the phenomenology of late capitalism). However equally, and more powerfully, there is no Tina Fey either. Both ladies are creations of our times and, without a doubt in my mind, Ms. Fey is the superior, especially when she’s pretending to be Mrs. Palin.

      All that argy bargy aside, I do believe many media members actually strive for the PalinFey state. Once they’ve become the caricature of actual news people then they get big money thrown at them and A Job On FOX. That network, as far as I can tell, is completely staffed by such individuals.

      • jimeejohnson - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:35 PM

        They don’t call it FAUX FAKE news for nothing, nor is it the most popular news thanks to the plethora of useful idiots for the rich and powerful.

      • Ben - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:39 PM

        What can I say, cur? I just dropped out of my phd program, so I gotta keep myself entertained somehow until I find a job.
        I was actually thinking about just that with Fey/Palin–the problem with Palin is she’s already a simulation, so what does that make Tina Fey? Your possibility is certainly one possibility, and I think we could argue that Stephen Colbert’s impersonation of a rightwing blowhard politician makes him more of a politician than most rightwing blowhards. I think what they actually point to is the larger nullification of politics tout court in America.

      • cur68 - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:49 PM

        Ah, you mention Steven Colbert, on of my heroes. He, being a Bill O’Rielly simulation, is pretty much the original PalinFey as far as I’m concerned.

        Pity about your PhD program. To have even made it that far demonstrates a certain amount perseverance and wit. The trick with employment and grad studies I’ve found, is to find that niche that presumes you’ll finish the degree before you actually do. Then, when they’ve got you all hired up and trained and you’ve become indispensable, then you can loaf along, turning in 1/3 of a chapter every 6 to 8 months. I speak from experience here.

  8. kopy - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:02 AM

    Indistinguishable parodies are dangerous. I don’t like them. People really think Sarah Palin said she could see Alaska from her house. “Identity theft is not a joke, Jim! Millions of families suffer every year!”

    • Francisco (FC) - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:11 AM

      People really think Sarah Palin said she could see Alaska from her house.

      Given that she lives in Alaska (or lived in Alaska at the time of that famous quote) why couldn’t she it from her house? Or do you mean Russia?

      • kopy - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:30 AM

        Ha! I did mean Russia. What Palin had really said was that you can see Russia from parts of Alaska, which is true.

      • jimeejohnson - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:37 PM

        Not from Palin’s house you can’t. She put her foot in her big stupid mouth and then ran for vice-President. What the hell were those Republicans thinking putting a dumb as sin phony on the ticket? McCain might have won if it was not for Failin’ Palin.

    • kiwicricket - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:15 AM

      Michael!!

    • nobody78 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:21 AM

      Not everyone knows this, but I have it on good authority that she was HARBORING ALASKANS IN HER HOUSE!

    • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:51 AM

      Well with all the uncategorically stupid things she HAS said, what’s one or two more that she hasn’t?

  9. Kevin S. - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:09 AM

    It’s fair to criticize Girardi for how he uses his data (he puts entirely too much emphasis on data points that are entirely too granular to draw conclusions from), but ripping him for trying to seek out the information that can give his team an edge? That’s his bloody job.

    • paperlions - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:35 AM

      This * 1000.

      In fairness to managers, they are often pressed to make a decision, and typically sample sizes to make informed decisions are lacking….so the rely on what they have….if it works, he’s a genius (according to the media), and if it doesn’t he’s a geek (again, media). In reality, he usually just got lucky/unlucky as anything can happen in any single AB no matter what choice a manager makes.

  10. kiwicricket - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:10 AM

    Who are these two witches?

    • Francisco (FC) - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:12 AM

      I know New Zealand is on the ass end of the world Kiwi, but how do you not know who they are?

      • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:18 AM

        Now, now, you can see from his post that the internet reaches down there.

        Honestly, I have no idea who’s ever run for President in NZ. Or is it Parliament. No clue. I certainly have no idea if they have satire–do they? Yeah, they prolly do.

      • Francisco (FC) - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:24 AM

        Kiwi has been playing in our FB league, with lots of chats, so there has been many cultural exchanges during the season, I’m almost certain Palin-Fey came up at some point.

      • kiwicricket - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:25 AM

        I was at a little seaside restaurant in Croatia a couple years ago. The final remaining group of tables joined together for a few drinks and high spirits. Played a distorted game of pictionary among the muti-national group, which was interesting. The American girl, very pleasant, astute, pleaded her case but no one managed to understand her case. It was Sarah Palin. Moral of the story????
        Not many people outside of the States gives a f*ck about some bumpkin political mouthpiece. Prefer it that way.

      • kiwicricket - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:29 AM

        I am still getting over Trump and the other gentleman sitting with him at the ballgame. I did not need to learn about him.

      • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:54 AM

        Sadly Kiwi a good percentage of Americans hold that bumpkin political mouthpiece in high regard.

      • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:54 AM

        Sadly Kiwi, a good percentage of Americans hold that bumpkin political mouthpiece in high regard.

      • cur68 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:56 AM

        he never heard of Calvin & Hobbes, either. Where did we go wrong, FC? The boy’s grown up ignorant of the finest things in life.

      • The Rabbit - Aug 10, 2012 at 5:47 PM

        FC
        As has been pointed out, this week it was Calvin and Hobbes and Calvin’s snowmen, in particular the French Revolution series and last week it was douchebag Bill O’Reilly after he was observed at a ballgame.
        Cur and I have tried our best as foster parents to get kiwi up to speed on this hemisphere’s strange fascination with those who are firmly planted on the left side on intelligence bell curve, but so many topics…so little time. Hell, we are still debating who won the War of 1812. (Who said FB leagues were boring?) So, we haven’t mentioned Palin-Fey. Cur, we have failed!
        In fairness to kiwi, he spends a lot of time in rural sometimes third world regions so he may not be exposed to the same level of cr*p that we are. Lucky him!

    • miketorrez - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:28 AM

      Well you should care, because whoever becomes President of the US has repercussions for the rest of the world. See 2000-2008.

      • kopy - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:32 AM

      • nightman13 - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:56 AM

        Kopy-

        If I could thumbs up 1,000 times I would

      • stlouis1baseball - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:27 PM

        Or…see 2008 – 2012. Let’s just hope he doesn’t get the chance to carry that through 2016.

  11. kiwicricket - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:17 AM

    Excuse me?? I would like you to prove it’s at a particular ‘end’.
    One’s some troll a decent chunk of the US thought was a good idea to try elect….the other….no fricking idea.

    • natslady - Aug 10, 2012 at 11:20 AM

      Use your google. It was funny for a while, but I long ago lost interest.

  12. bigleagues - Aug 10, 2012 at 12:33 PM

    I don’t believe these writers truly believe half the stuff they write. I truly believe that Editors strategize the storylines they assign to their columnists in order to reflect the voice of ‘Joe Fan’ and maximize readership.

    I mean God-forbid that more sports columnists attempt to be cerebral and make logical sense in their arguments and observations.

  13. panktics - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:38 PM

    Why do other Yankee fans hate him hes no joe torre but he’s good

    • Kevin S. - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:04 PM

      I actually prefer him to Torre. It’s not like Torre was some kind of strategic savant, and the difference between the two at managing the bullpen is massive.

  14. panktics - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:41 PM

    Check out my Yankees/celtics/packers blog at panktics.wordpress.con

  15. panktics - Aug 10, 2012 at 1:42 PM

    Also leave some comments

    • raysfan1 - Aug 10, 2012 at 5:50 PM

      better idea–you leave comments here, and if they tend to be interesting, then someone might follow your link. Otherwise all you’re doing is wasting everyone’s time/boring people.

  16. electstat - Aug 10, 2012 at 2:21 PM

    What’s his record as a manager? I’ll take his stats.

  17. yahmule - Aug 10, 2012 at 3:38 PM

    Anybody defending Palin should read Game Change. Her own handlers were painfully aware of how inept and unqualified she was for the job. Although, I imagine anyone defending Palin shares her intellectually incurious nature and wouldn’t be capable of reading a book that spanned over 400 pages.

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