Skip to content

Orioles draft pick Kevin Grendell suspended 50 games

Sep 5, 2012, 12:48 PM EDT

account suspended

Orioles pitching prospect Kevin Grendell, who was an 11th-round pick in June’s draft out of a California high school, has been suspended 50 games after testing positive for a banned substance called Dehydroepiandrosterone.

Grendell had been pitching in the rookie-level Gulf Coast League, where the left-hander got knocked around for 15 runs in 17 innings during his pro debut.

Because the minor-league season is over he’ll have to sit out the first couple months of next year.

According to my extensive Wikipedia research Dehydroepiandrosterone is a steroid hormone and the same drug NBA players O.J. Mayo and Rashard Lewis were suspended for using a few years back. It is legal to buy in the United States as a dietary supplement.

  1. vivabear - Sep 5, 2012 at 1:27 PM

    So, DHEA? Testosterone precursor, can be purchased as part of a vitapak @ GNC. Too bad he didn’t bother to read the banned substances list.

  2. rr2000k - Sep 5, 2012 at 3:59 PM

    15 runs in 17 innings….sounds like he needs more PED’s.

    • longerlasting - Sep 5, 2012 at 5:17 PM

      15 runs in 17 innings……….sounds like he needs a new profession.

  3. willclarkgameface - Sep 5, 2012 at 4:58 PM

    I love substances I can’t even pronounce.

    Wouldn’t you think that if you can’t pronounce it, you maybe shouldn’t put it in your body? I get the impression that this kid probably can’t pronounce it either.

    • ptfu - Sep 5, 2012 at 6:01 PM

      In that case, don’t read the ingredients list for any mass-market processed or preserved food. There are some real tongue-twisters in there, and you’ll never eat again.

      • willclarkgameface - Sep 5, 2012 at 6:54 PM

        Dude, I don’t eat shit I can’t read. That’s a rule in my house.

    • dowhatifeellike - Sep 5, 2012 at 6:45 PM

      To non-biologists or chemists, most of the molecules in the human body are unpronouncable. Does that mean they shouldn’t be there?

      The same thing applies to everything you eat. Broccoli has a ton of long-named molecules too, but the FDA doesn’t require them to be spelled out.

  4. anthonyverna - Sep 5, 2012 at 5:14 PM

    Who?

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

The Jon Lester-Yoenis Cespedes trade is a win-win
Top 10 MLB Player Searches