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Michael Morse does a bit of mime work

Sep 29, 2012, 10:08 PM EDT

Nationals slugger Michael Morse hit a grand slam in the top of the first inning Saturday against the Cardinals’ Kyle Lohse. But the ball barely cleared the right field wall at Busch Stadium and was initially ruled a base hit, which caused some confusion on the basepaths. Thus, we get probably the best highlight since replay for home runs was instituted:

There’s nothing in the rule book that requires that sort of thing, but the umpires wanted to be sure that all of the bases were touched and that no one was lapped. And Morse was apparently asked to mimic a swing to start the runners. It seemed to draw laughter, then boos, from the sold-out crowd in St. Louis.

The Nats defeated the Cards in 10 innings by a score of 6-4 to earn their 96th win of the season.

  1. dl3mk3 - Sep 29, 2012 at 10:23 PM

    That was fun.

  2. natstowngreg - Sep 29, 2012 at 10:25 PM

    After more than a half-century of watching MLB games, I hesitate to say it was the weirdest play I’ve seen. It was the weirdest play I’ve seen.

    Meanwhile, Drew Storen blew the save. Tied at 4 after 9.

    • paperlions - Sep 29, 2012 at 10:50 PM

      That’s ok. TLR never learned that IBB were bad ideas…..Matheny hasn’t figured it out yet either.

      • natstowngreg - Sep 29, 2012 at 10:54 PM

        Especially to one of the MLB leaders in strikeouts.

        BTW, someone is going to have to explain why the A’s gave away Kurt Suzuki for almost nothing.

      • clydeserra - Sep 30, 2012 at 3:58 AM

        in 75 games he was hitting 218/250/286 for an OPS+of 50. following a seasons of OPS+ 65, 89, and 83. Prior to signing his extension he was around 100 for three years (like he is for the nats in 39 games.

        Thats why.

      • natslady - Sep 30, 2012 at 7:16 AM

        natstowngreg==> Don’t you know the Nats have a great hitting coach?

  3. natstowngreg - Sep 29, 2012 at 10:59 PM

    Nats blew the lead provided by Morse’s grand slam, then got 2 in th 10th. Magic number for the NL East is now one.

    Dodgers 2, Rockies 0, bottom 6. Switched to it to hear me a little Vin Scully.

    • Brian Donohue - Sep 29, 2012 at 11:22 PM

      Vin showed the highlight of the “phantom GS” and concluded: “never in all my years…”

      Now: if Vin Scully has never seen it before, you know it’s a unique moment in beisbol history.

  4. dcfan4life - Sep 29, 2012 at 11:06 PM

    That was great. Every baseball analyst saying they have never seen that. Every player saying they have never seen that. i think I have already heard or read like 300 years of baseball experience all saying the same thing, that they have never seen a play like this. Now we all have haha.

  5. cur68 - Sep 29, 2012 at 11:07 PM

    Awesome. Next, can we get him to mimic sliding into 2nd to break up the DP? Young fella’s got a gift.

    • indaburg - Sep 30, 2012 at 8:29 AM

      That was the most absurdly sublime thing I have ever seen on a baseball field. While he does appear naturally gifted in the art of mime, he looked like he mimicked a weak grounder to third. Come on, Morse, put a little muscle in that fake swing.

      • cur68 - Sep 30, 2012 at 8:38 AM

        Shoulda called his shot, too.

      • indaburg - Sep 30, 2012 at 9:26 AM

        Oh, man, that would have been priceless. If he had done that, he would have instantly become my favorite baseball player.

      • natstowngreg - Sep 30, 2012 at 11:42 AM

        It was OK for Morse to take the fake swing. After all, per Adam Kilgore of The Washington Post. Yadier Molina encouraged him.

        http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/nationals-vs-cardinals-kurt-suzukis-10th-inning-double-lifts-washington-magic-number-down-to-1/2012/09/29/e57854ec-0a6d-11e2-933e-28d53c6ac092_story_1.html

        Some Cards fans booed, which was understandable, not knowing what was going on at the plate. Props to Yadi and the Cards for understanding how ridiculous the situation was. However, if Morse had done the 1932 Babe Ruth impersonation, I suspect the Cards would have been really ticked. Justifiably so, IMHO.

      • indaburg - Sep 30, 2012 at 1:04 PM

        So Craig was right about Nats fans being pretty close to humorless? ;-)

      • cur68 - Sep 30, 2012 at 3:25 PM

        Seriously? A grown man has to stand up there and play “lets pretend” and if he DARES inject a bit of humour into it, its a bad move? Well dang that noise to heck. Not only should he have “called the shot”, he should have “flipped the bat”, “pimped it” & gone full cadillac as he admired the flight. Lets get real (ish): it was a farcical situation. Give the crowd a show.

  6. number42is1 - Sep 29, 2012 at 11:40 PM

    First player in MLB history to hit two grand slams in one at bat. FACT!

    • paperlions - Sep 30, 2012 at 9:47 AM

      First player to hit one without a bat.

  7. tomtravis76 - Sep 30, 2012 at 1:02 AM

    Morse is a great character for baseball, he brought back the “low tens” this season. The national baseball stage is going to enjoy rooting for this Nats team in the post season.

    • indaburg - Sep 30, 2012 at 8:37 AM

      I don’t know about the national baseball stage rooting for the Nationals. There seems to be a schadenfreude faction of pundits who will enjoy yelling “I told you shutting doing Strasburg was a mistake! I told you so! But you wouldn’t listen, would ya!” if the Nats fail.

    • koufaxmitzvah - Sep 30, 2012 at 8:49 AM

      Not so sure about that, but the Nats will earn some respect from me with a win today for their division championship.

      Je me souviens les Expos. Especially in ’94.

  8. jayscarpa - Sep 30, 2012 at 8:46 AM

    The play-by-play guy was on the ball.

  9. westcoastredbird - Sep 30, 2012 at 9:55 AM

    The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Apparently Matheny hasn’t figured out that Salas keeps giving up game winning homers and has 0 saves. I would sure like to see Jose Oquendo in the dugout and Matheny doing a windmill impersonation at third.

    • paperlions - Sep 30, 2012 at 10:27 AM

      That is a definition, but not a very good one. By that definition, every human is insane. Examples abound…just stand in front of a broken elevator, or listen to someone complain about their problems (which are typically a result of doing the same thing over and over and the problem getting worse and worse, whether it is with respect to work, relationships, choices, whatever).

      • natstowngreg - Sep 30, 2012 at 11:46 AM

        Um, dude, every human IS insane.

      • paperlions - Sep 30, 2012 at 12:12 PM

        That wouldn’t be a very useful concept then….would it?

  10. bcjim - Sep 30, 2012 at 10:24 AM

    Gotta hand it to the Braves, they just havent laid down, but looks like they are out of time.

  11. 4cornersfan - Sep 30, 2012 at 12:53 PM

    The real question in all of this is why Morse did not point to the outfield and call his shot like Babe Ruth. Another great opportunity in the history of mime squandered.

  12. randygnyc - Sep 30, 2012 at 5:08 PM

    Cur- your analysis was spot on. Morse should have gone all in on the recreation.

    I didn’t catch wind of this until now and reviewed the play. Morse had no idea what to do. As he retraced his steps to first base, he pointed at home as if to say, “do I have to go back to the batters box?”. Then, as he approached home plate, he swung his hands as if asking, “do I have to swing too?”

    Surreal. Along with the blue jays’ Jenkins’ line drive catch, (while imitating Charlie brown, except his clothes didn’t fly off), it’s possible to see something new everyday. And I’ve been watching baseball for more than 40 years.

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