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Ken Davidoff, Tom Glavine and the New York Marathon

Nov 5, 2012, 9:05 AM EDT

Glavine Mets

There isn’t much of a baseball connection between the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, the New York Marathon controversy from late last week and over the weekend and baseball, but New York Post baseball writer Ken Davidoff has a good column up on it today.

Scroll down past his stuff about his free agent predictions and you’ll see where he talks about how he had been training for the New York Marathon for almost a year. He talks about the weirdness and uncertainty of last week when, despite there being no good reason on the planet to run the marathon and a million good ones not to, the New York Road Runners and the city insisted that the thing still go on, only to finally bow to common sense on Friday afternoon (and then said flat out dumbass things in the wake of it over the weekend).

After that, Davidoff makes a good analogy to Tom Glavine’s last performance in a Mets uniform that, in moments when baseball fans lose perspective, is often referred to as a disaster. Go check it out and remember it the next time someone uses extreme terms to talk about things that happen on a baseball diamond.

  1. proudlycanadian - Nov 5, 2012 at 9:33 AM

    An enjoyable read Craig. Thank you for the link.

  2. schlom - Nov 5, 2012 at 12:25 PM

    Everyone knows that only NFL and NBA games may go on during the aftermath of a big storm!

  3. tomgallagher76 - Nov 5, 2012 at 2:43 PM

    despite there being no good reason on the planet to run the marathon and a million good ones not to, the New York Road Runners and the city insisted that the thing still go on, only to finally bow to common sense on Friday afternoon

    Not true. There were actually 340 million reasons to run the race. The race brings an average of $340 million to NYC’s economy, a big help towards the recovery, and would have taken little to nothing away from the recovery effort. The big generators that were sitting in Central Park for the media that everyone was making a big deal about have now, predictably, gone back into storage and are not being used where they would be most useful in the recovery effort. All in all, by canceling the Marathon NY successfully kept itself from $340 million and gained nothing.

  4. nyfootballgiants - Nov 6, 2012 at 9:48 AM

    The reason the race was canceled was becaue the sponsors were abandoning ship. Canceling the marathon did not cost the city $340 million – because many of the hotel rooms were taken by people who lost their homes, etc….

    Running the marathon also required pulling police officers from their jobs protecting the people who lost their homes, and the rescue effort to do crowd control.

    As a Staten Island resident, the only bad decision was waiting until the 11th hour to cancel the race. The NYRR (which i am a member of) thoroughly embarrassed themselves and the NY Metro Area with their incipid comments in the aftermath of canceling the race.

    • tomgallagher76 - Nov 6, 2012 at 11:05 AM

      If the city makes an estimated $340 million from the race, and the race was canceled, how did that not keep the city from making $340 million? The $340 million was for more than hotel rooms it also includes travel, entertainment and retail spending. I don’t get how the taken hotel rooms negates the entire $340 million.

      As for pulling police officers from their jobs, let us go to the source: Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said police officers will not be taken off storm-recovery duty to work the marathon. He said the estimated 2,000 officers on the marathon route come in on their days off, on overtime, while those on storm duty work extended shifts on their regular work days. – http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ny-mayor-criticized-not-canceling-marathon

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