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Edwin Jackson stops wandering the Earth, is introduced as a Cub

Jan 3, 2013, 10:31 AM EDT

Edwin Jackson

Edwin Jackson has been traded six times and has pitched for seven teams in the past eight seasons. You’d be excused, then, for assuming that there’s something teams don’t like about that guy. But yesterday, when he was announced as the Cubs’ latest acquisition, there was no suggestion of that at all. Patrick Mooney of CSNChicago.com reports:

“We did all the digging we could do,” Hoyer said. “The reasons for him moving around certainly weren’t (because) he wasn’t a good teammate or didn’t work hard. It was kind of more contractual.”

As Jackson said with a smile: “Everyone likes me.”

For what it’s worth, I’ve never heard anything about Jackson being disliked or anything. In addition to the contractual stuff — which has mattered the past couple of seasons, as everyone has known he would not sign a long-term contract before reaching free agency — I think there is just something unique about him as a pitcher that has made him ultimately tradeable.

He’s a lottery ticket. Or a coin in a fountain. He’s got great stuff at times, and everyone can watch him pitch for a while and imagine him paying off huge. But at other times, when one is being rational, one can see his flaws and risks. In this regard he reminds me of Sid Fernandez. And to some extent Matt Clement. Guys who, at times, look unhittable and at other times, man do they get hit.

Anyway, because of his highs and lows, this back and forth happens with Jackson more than it does with other pitchers.  It leads to a greater-than-usual frequency of one team (his own) being tired of him and another team wanting a piece of that lottery ticket. That’s my theory anyway.

Maybe he pays off for the Cubs. Maybe he doesn’t. But it’ll be interesting to see how he’s handled now that he’s a long-term investment rather than a lottery ticket.

  1. El Bravo - Jan 3, 2013 at 11:13 AM

    I for one will enjoy seeing Eddy Jax on the North Side.

  2. 18thstreet - Jan 3, 2013 at 12:35 PM

    I’ve always been suspicious of guys who play for many, many teams. It was the unheeded red flag about Carl Everett.

  3. dodger88 - Jan 3, 2013 at 12:53 PM

    Considering he’s looking to comeback, much of the same can said about Javier Vasquez. He was lights out at times and dreadful other times and thus played for several teams usually via trade.

  4. sportfandc - Jan 3, 2013 at 1:07 PM

    He was well-liked in DC. I heard Mike Rizzo refer to him as “one of the finest human beings I’ve been associated with in baseball.”

    Consistency, not likeability, has been his problem.

    Good luck to EJax!

  5. cur68 - Jan 3, 2013 at 1:30 PM

    He could be the Jose Bautista of pitchers. Traded all over the place. not because he’s a bad teammate but because no one wanted to take the chance. And rightly so. Like Bautiista, flashes of what he could become, but also lots of dreck.

    Good luck, Edwin Jackson.

  6. iladel90 - Jan 3, 2013 at 9:01 PM

    Check out this fun free baseball game

    http://brushbackbaseball.com/index.jsp?rf=1233

    Create & train players or run a team.

  7. cardsman - Jan 4, 2013 at 4:53 PM

    Perfect for the Cubbies. Full of promise and potential. Hope he comes into his own in Chitown. Maybe He can be part of the Cubs, breaking thru the jinx. It might be, it could be, I doubt it.After seemingly, a whole City, made a “GOAT”, out of a innocent, loyal fan.Just for being one of several fans, trying to catch a foul ball, I became a believer in the “Cubs Curse”. If it was about too end, I believe that ridiculous lynching, of an innocent Man, renewed it! Unbelievable!

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