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The Dodgers and Clayton Kershaw have “mutual interest” in a contract extension

Feb 7, 2013, 10:03 PM EDT

Clayton Kershaw AP AP

As soon as word surfaced this afternoon that the Mariners and Felix Hernandez were on the verge of a record $175 million extension, many speculated that Dodgers left-hander Clayton Kershaw could eventually push the $200 million mark. We’ll have to wait to find out, but Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti told Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times this evening that there is “mutual interest” in getting something done.

“This is not going to be a daily discussion point for us publicly,” Colletti said. “But there is a mutual interest.”

Colletti wouldn’t confirm whether the two sides have begun negotiations, but he said earlier this winter that he could look into the matter after addressing the team’s needs in free agency. Kershaw, who turns 25 in March, is under contract for $11 million in 2013 and will be eligible for free agency following the 2014 season.

Justin Verlander and David Price also figure to do very well with their next contracts, but given Kershaw’s age and the Dodgers’ free-spending ways, he might be best-positioned to be the game’s first $200 million hurler.

 

  1. echech88 - Feb 7, 2013 at 11:24 PM

    If I’m Kershaw I try to get this done before the season before teams realize this is crazy.

  2. djjackson81 - Feb 8, 2013 at 1:27 AM

    Ya La Give him 200$ it has Arod written all over it

  3. escapingexile - Feb 8, 2013 at 8:22 AM

    I totally see the similarities. I mean one is a left handed pitcher, the other is a right handed third baseman. One is a Dominican born in NYC and the other an American born in Dallas. One is 24, the other is 37. One spends his off-season in Zambia helping orphans, the other spends it in Miami doing well, you know. Come on people, it’s like they’re twins…..

    You see, the difference is not handing over an obscene amount of money, but rather the rest of the factors involved. At 32 years old when ARod signed for 10/275m, it should have been a pretty safe assumption by most that at best he was in the plateau portion of his career which only leaves one way to go. At 24 years old, dare I say we haven’t even seen the best of Clayton yet. That in itself makes it pretty scary for a guy whose aged 22-24 seasons has averaged 222 innings pitched with an ERA of 2.57 and also racked up one CY and a second place finish.

    I know, people will point to the inherent risk of handing out large contracts to a pitcher, which I agree with in principal. However, in this day and age if a team wants to be a landing spot for superstar players they have to be willing to take risks and hand out large contracts. If the Dodgers won’t pay Clayton, you can sure bet that somebody will. As a Dodger fan, I would be totally fine with making him the highest paid pitcher in the game, but that comes with a stipulation. The key is to not make it so far in front of everyone that over the course of the contract the upper echelon of elite pitchers signing new contracts won’t be passing him up. The thinking there is that the contract itself becomes financially more valuable at the end in relation to other pitchers around the league and the production you will still be getting from Clayton in his early thirties The problem with ARod is that at this point, halfway through his contract, his salary is still quite a distance out in front of everyone with a rapidly declining skill set. That doesn’t make him valuable to the Yankees or anyone else.

    • paperlions - Feb 8, 2013 at 8:59 AM

      People born in NYC are “Americans”, unless you want to call Kershaw an Englishman born in Dallas, that would be fair.

      • escapingexile - Feb 8, 2013 at 9:15 AM

        In deed…. I suppose that was a poor way to describe what that point was aiming for.

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