Skip to content

Remembering Buck O’Neil, Seven Years Later

Feb 27, 2013, 5:16 PM EST

Soul of Baseball

Seven years ago today, I was sitting in a conference room above the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City with my friend Buck O’Neil. It was the day that the Negro Leagues Special Committee was announcing who it had elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame … and it was widely assumed that Buck O’Neil would be one of those elected.

Maybe it should not have been widely assumed. The Hall of Fame case for Buck O’Neil is not a one-sentence exclamation. It is not “3,000 hits!” or “300 wins!” or “Hit in 56 straight games!” It is not simple or blunt or in-your-face. Buck’s case, like Buck’s life, is a patchwork quilt – he was a very good player (Negro Leagues batting champion in 1946), a very good manager (managed the dominant Kansas City Monarchs), a legendary scout (scouts, so far, are not elected to the Hall of Fame), the first black coach in the Major Leagues (for the Chicago Cubs), a joyous presence in the game (Ernie Banks said he learned “Let’s play two” from Buck O’Neil), the leading force in building the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, an unmatched baseball storyteller and a tireless champion of the Negro Leagues and the game of baseball. It is a Hall of Fame case that, from above, seems breathtakingly simple and powerful and undeniable – he profoundly impacted the game of baseball like few who ever lived. The game, without him, would be so much less.

You have to see the whole thing, though.

Point is, most people seemed to think Buck was going to be elected, and, yes, Buck too thought he was going to be elected. He sat in the conference room waiting for the good word, and reporters waited at the museum for Buck to come out and regale them with stories. When word came through that seventeen people – all of them long dead – had been elected, but Buck had not, I was looking right in his eyes. His face showed no emotion at all.

“Oh well,” he said, a little bit too quickly. “That’s the way the cookie crumbles.”

At the time, I was working on my book, “The Soul of Baseball: A Road Trip Through Buck O’Neil’s America.” I had been traveling the country with Buck for a year and watching how people responded to him, watching how much joy he passed on, watching how he simply let go of his bitterness, all of it, let it go and replaced it with good feelings and hope.

I admit, I was like most others. I thought, for sure, he was going to the Hall of Fame. Heck, I’d been told by someone who would know that one of the big reasons the Negro Leagues Special Committee had been put together was to honor Buck. I had expected this moment to would be the big ending for the book. I could imagine the movie scene (with Morgan Freeman as Buck). Sweeping music plays, and Buck gets the word that after all these years – after living a baseball life on the margins – he was going to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

And instead, Buck sat there and tried hard not to look disappointed. He was hurt. I know that. But he was not going to show that. This was a grandson of a slave, a man who was not allowed to attend Sarasota High School because of the color of his skin, a man who could not play in the Major Leagues, a man who never got to manage in the Major Leagues, a man who – even as Cubs coach – never got to coach at either first or third base. This was a man who had seen some of the worst of 20th Century America, who wore a grass skirt and put on war paint just so he could play ball, a man who told me that once his wife was in a department store, and she touched a hat. They made her buy it. That was the rule – if a black woman touched a hat, she had to buy it.

“So degrading,” he said. “So degrading.”

He had never let any of that make him hate … or lose faith … or give up hope on people. What was the Hall of Fame compared to those things?

“Let me ask you something,” he said after a long silence. “Who do you think will speak for the 17?”

“What do you mean?”

“At Cooperstown,” he said. “Who will speak on behalf of the 17 who go into the Hall of Fame?”

“I don’t know Buck. What difference does it make?”

“Well,” Buck said. “Do you think they’ll ask me?”

I looked at him then to see if he was serious. He was serious. It didn’t make sense at first.. I was angry for him. I was hurt for him. I was furious at the committee for not seeing Buck O’Neil from a high enough elevation. I was furious at the Hall of Fame and all of us for building up his hopes. In the moment, I honestly did not care who spoke for the 17 who were elected.

“You would do that?” I asked Buck. He smiled a little bit.

“Son,” he said. “What’s my life been all about?”

And he did speak for them. It was his last national public appearance … he spoke in front of the Hall of Fame on behalf of 17 people who had made the Negro Leagues robust and alive. And then, he led everyone who had gathered in Cooperstown in song. His favorite song.

The greatest thing … in all my life … is loving you.

The greatest thing … in all my life … is loving you.

The greatest thing … in all my life … is loving you.

The greatest thing … in all my life … is loving you.

That was the better ending, of course.  He died about two and a half months later. The last time I saw him in the hospital, he told me that he felt loved. Well, sure, he was loved.

Latest Posts
  1. Today was a good day for the Tigers

    Mar 2, 2015, 7:45 PM EST

    tigers logo Getty Images

    Some key players are making some encouraging strides on the health front.

  2. Alex Rodriguez to make Grapefruit League debut Wednesday

    Mar 2, 2015, 6:29 PM EST

    Alex Rodriguez AP AP

    After facing a pitching machine during an intrasquad game today, Alex Rodriguez is ready for his first real-live game action since September of 2013.

  3. The Yankees have a lot of retired numbers. Other teams should try to be more like them.

    Mar 2, 2015, 4:26 PM EST

    Retired numbers

    Trammell and Whitaker in Detroit? Carter and Hernandez with the Mets?

  4. Cubs name Jon Lester as Opening Day starter

    Mar 2, 2015, 3:45 PM EST

    jon lester getty Getty Images

    Lester joined the Cubs on a six-year, $155 million deal in December.

  5. Another weird spring training injury: Corey Hart and a hot tub

    Mar 2, 2015, 1:48 PM EST

    Corey Hart AP

    Hart is attempting to resurrect his career on a one-year deal as a part-timer in Pittsburgh.

  6. Chase Utley still not recovered from January ankle injury

    Mar 2, 2015, 11:50 AM EST

    utley getty Getty Images

    GM says “they’re not going to play him for a little while.”

  7. Glen Perkins is “strong and healthy” after late-season arm problems

    Mar 2, 2015, 10:47 AM EST

    Kansas City Royals v Minnesota Twins Getty Images

    Since shifting to the bullpen full time in 2011 the Minnesota native has a 2.74 ERA and 286/63 K/BB ratio in 256 innings.

  8. Rockies add John Axford to 40-man roster, guarantee $2.6 million salary

    Mar 2, 2015, 10:15 AM EST

    John Axford AP

    Axford had a 3.92 ERA and 63/36 K/BB ratio in 55 innings for the Indians last season.

  9. Charlie Brown: the worst manager of all time?

    Mar 2, 2015, 9:15 AM EST

    Pow

    Patrick Dubuque of The Hardball Times mounts an in-depth study of the Peanuts’ Gang’s manager.

  10. John Baker, Jeremy Brown, coal mines and class

    Mar 2, 2015, 8:17 AM EST

    Coal Miners

    The lives of a couple of “Moneyball” players serves as a jumping off point for a good Monday morning rant.

  11. Carlos Rodon will take Chris Sale’s rotation spot in Cactus League action

    Mar 1, 2015, 10:25 PM EST

    Carlos Rodon Carlos Rodon

    Though pitching prospect Carlos Rodon is taking over for Chris Sale, he likely isn’t pitching for an Opening Day role with the White Sox.

  12. Yoenis Cespedes would like to play for the Tigers beyond 2015

    Mar 1, 2015, 9:20 PM EST

    Yoenis Cespedes Yoenis Cespedes

    Yoenis Cespedes could see himself wearing a Tigers uniform for many years.

  13. Bryce Harper: “I have to step up a little bit.”

    Mar 1, 2015, 8:15 PM EST

    Bryce Harper Bryce Harper

    Bryce Harper wants to do more to help out on offense for the Nationals.

Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. J. Santana (2746)
  2. E. Cabrera (2642)
  3. M. Upton (2457)
  4. A. Simmons (2379)
  5. H. Bailey (2359)