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White Sox have discussed extension with Chris Sale

Mar 5, 2013, 7:05 PM EDT

chris sale getty Getty Images

CSNChicago.com’s Dan Hayes has the story:

White Sox pitcher Chris Sale confirmed Tuesday his representatives have had discussions with the club about a contract extension.

“We’ve been kind of back and forth but nothing too crazy right now,” Sale told reporters on Tuesday.

The 23-year-old lefty isn’t eligible for arbitration until next winter, so it’s far from imperative that something gets done before start of the 2013 regular season.

Sale posted a superb 3.05 ERA, 1.14 WHIP and 192 strikeouts across 192 innings in 2012 — his first full season as a starter. He had a 2.79 ERA, 1.11 WHIP and 79 strikeouts in 71 innings as a reliever in 2011.

  1. soobster - Mar 5, 2013 at 8:13 PM

    If he was smart he would wait for free agency. With all the lung studs getting hometown extensions of he hit the market he would blow their deals out of the water bc not many great young pitchers hit the market.

    • paperlions - Mar 5, 2013 at 8:34 PM

      Of course, the likelihood that he makes it through the next 5 years without injury or a decline in performance is small. Especially since most scouts seem to think with his delivery an TJ surgery is in his near future.

      Injuries for young pitchers are so common, that if he can get a deal that just buys out his arb years, he should jump on it.

      • Reflex - Mar 6, 2013 at 1:59 AM

        Fully agree. He’s another Inverted W pitcher, so yeah TJ surgery is highly likely in his case. If he can get a guaranteed contract now, he should jump on it.

  2. unclemosesgreen - Mar 5, 2013 at 8:42 PM

    Last year in my friendly neighborhood mixed-league auction I spent my last dollar on Gerardo Parra as a second reserve outfielder while my buddy waited it out and ended up getting Chris Sale for a dollar. True story.

    Sale should ask Mike Trout how much leverage he has as a non-arb eligible player.

    • Kevin S. - Mar 5, 2013 at 9:51 PM

      Trout and Sale are two different cases. Negotiating a single, pre-arb year gives the player absolutely no leverage – he takes what the team gives him. Negotiating an extension gives the player much more leverage. He has the ability to go year-to-year and deny his team cost certainty if they do not meet his price. Obviously the team is still in a stronger position, but the player isn’t completely powerless.

      • unclemosesgreen - Mar 5, 2013 at 10:25 PM

        You are right, sir, factually. However, as far as exagerating to make a point on the internet goes, I am holding trump cards. They are somewhat different cases.

        To state exactly what I meant, Chris Sale has marginally more leverage than Mike Trout, but will continue to be similarly underpaid for the time being.

      • paperlions - Mar 6, 2013 at 7:09 AM

        Sale actually has far less leverage because 1) he isn’t as good, and 2) injury rates for pitchers are sooooo much higher, that if the WS extend Sale now, there is a good chance they’ll be paying more than if they went year-to-year. In contrast, even though Trout will regress, he performance should vary less and his risk of significant injury causing the loss of 1+ seasons during the next 4 years is tiny compared to any 23 yr old starting pitcher. Teams know both of these things and would act accordingly….of course, agents know them too….meaning Sale should be happy with a smaller/shorter deal than Trout should.

      • Kevin S. - Mar 6, 2013 at 11:14 AM

        He has less leverage than Trout for a long-term deal, but it was pretty clear that whole “ask Trout how much leverage he has as a non-arbitration player” was referring to Trout only being renewed for $20k over the minimum, not his ability to work out an extension buying out arbitration and possible FA years.

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