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Drake Britton “extremely remorseful” following DUI arrest

Mar 8, 2013, 3:31 PM EDT

Drake Britton

Red Sox prospect Drake Britton, who was arrested earlier this week and charged with driving under the influence while being clocked at 111 miles per hour, made a brief statement today:

I’m extremely remorseful. It’s an internal matter that’s going on right now. I’m sorry for the negativity that I brought, but that’s about all I can say right now. I’d really rather not say anything else.

Obviously it’d be nice for Britton to apologize for the actual behavior, rather than “the negativity that I brought” due to the behavior, but considering the legal implications that was never going to happen.

Shortly after the arrest the Red Sox optioned Britton to Double-A and reassigned him to minor league camp. In addition to the DUI he was also charged with reckless driving and property damage for allegedly hopping a curb and driving through a barbwire fence into the woods, but as usual because there were no performance-enhancing drugs involved there won’t be an MLB-issued suspension of any kind.

  1. shaggylocks - Mar 8, 2013 at 3:48 PM

    Ugh. Baseball players should save the triple digit MPH’s for their fastballs.

  2. historiophiliac - Mar 8, 2013 at 4:01 PM

    Does “internal matter” mean “blood alcohol level”? WTH does that mean?

    • unclemosesgreen - Mar 8, 2013 at 5:49 PM

      It’s the “Jason Giambi” – a non-specific public act of contrition. The lawyers say that he can’t make any specific comment regarding the case, so as not to provide the prosecution any further evidence or angles to pursue against him.

      • historiophiliac - Mar 8, 2013 at 7:01 PM

        They could’ve come up with a better way to say it…something that didn’t sound like indigestion at least.

      • paperlions - Mar 8, 2013 at 7:50 PM

        I suppose. But if you are actually sorry, wouldn’t that involve willingly taking your punishment for the violation (which, in this case, included putting people’s lives in danger), as well as not repeating the offense?

        To me, trying to get out of the conviction shows that he is sorry he was caught, not that he is sorry for driving drunk.

      • bigharold - Mar 9, 2013 at 1:12 AM

        “To me, trying to get out of the conviction shows that he is sorry he was caught, not that he is sorry for driving drunk.”

        Really, because to me only an imbecile would willingly seek to put himself in the worst possible circumstance even when he screwed up. What are you a thousand years old? Have you NEVER done anything stupid or is it that it was just so long ago you don’t remember it/them? Try reining in the sanctimonious BS and look at the whole issue.

        First and foremost regardless of what he says, .. his behavior going forward will be far more indicative of his intent with regard to his statement. Secondly, .. he’s a 23 year old kid that did something stupid. That’s what 23 year old’s do. God forbid somebody was following me around at 23, back in the 70s, with a camera reporting on every stupid thing I did. Cause, I’ll fess up and say I drove my car and motorcycle too fast and partied too much.

        Nobody is in favor of or is minimizing DUI but to date he’s only harmed himself. Only he will deal with the consequences, both legally and professionally. Let him be responsible for what he’s done, .. not every horrific possibility. Save the sanctimony for those that really deserve it.

  3. jarathen - Mar 8, 2013 at 4:07 PM

    Baseball needs to own this. Cars for everyone a phone call away (I know the NFL does this – does baseball?), and suspensions in place. When a ballplayer drinks himself to oblivion and kills someone, what then?

    • chc4 - Mar 8, 2013 at 4:14 PM

      Seriously? This is MLB’s fault? So when you do something stupid in your off time is it your employers fault? Give me a break. Ever heard of the term “personal responsibility”?

      • jarathen - Mar 8, 2013 at 4:24 PM

        Baseball should protect its brand by putting official consequences in place for players who damage their brand with criminal activity. It should also endeavor to provide services for players to not only keep them out of trouble, but contributing to the future of that brand.

      • cosanostra71 - Mar 8, 2013 at 4:37 PM

        It wouldn’t be that hard for the MLB to set up a service similar to the NFL’s. Whether it works or not (the NFL’s hasn’t) is a separate question, but I don’t think it is asking too much of the MLB for them to set up a safe rides program.

      • sabatimus - Mar 8, 2013 at 5:02 PM

        I didn’t read “this is MLB’s fault” in the OP. Not sure where you read it. But suspensions for DUIs in MLB are LONG overdue.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Mar 8, 2013 at 6:03 PM

        It wouldn’t be that hard for the MLB to set up a service similar to the NFL’s. Whether it works or not (the NFL’s hasn’t) is a separate question, but I don’t think it is asking too much of the MLB for them to set up a safe rides program.

        Isn’t the MLB minimum like $450K a year? Hire a damn driver and take some responsibility for yourself.

  4. psuravens19 - Mar 8, 2013 at 7:09 PM

    I don’t feel bad for this kid whatsoever. He’s lucky he didn’t hurt or kill somebody.

  5. jcmeyer10 - Mar 8, 2013 at 7:53 PM

    “Yah, I really my chances of making the big club in the leg, and for that I apologize,” *someone whispers in his ear and he looks over*, “What do you mean apologize for being arrested,”?

    • jcmeyer10 - Mar 8, 2013 at 7:54 PM

      “Yah, I really shot my chances of making the big club in the leg, and for that I apologize,” *someone whispers in his ear and he looks over*, “What do you mean apologize for being arrested,”?

      This is a Highlights magazine challenge, spot the difference.

      • historiophiliac - Mar 8, 2013 at 11:29 PM

        There’s a gun in the 1st picture?

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