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So, someone sent Cubs owner Tom Ricketts a goat’s head

Apr 10, 2013, 11:47 PM EST

Tom Ricketts AP

As everyone knows, the Cubs have been plagued by the “Curse of the Billy Goat” since 1945. Well, that and a lot of bad management and not all that much incentive to win since fans keep packing Wrigley Field regardless.

But someone is taking this goat thing rather seriously, it seems. Dropped off at Gate K at Wrigley on Wednesday was a suspicious package addressed to owner Tom Ricketts, according to CSNChicago.com. Inside was a goat’s head and nothing else. There was no note. Not a return address. Police were called to the scene and are investigating the matter. They might want to check if all of the rooftop owners have alibis.

This is the second straight year with a goat incident at Wrigley. Last year, someone strung up a severed goat’s head outside of the ballpark.

  1. yankeesgameday - Apr 10, 2013 at 11:55 PM

    This was just a promo for Hannibal from the same department at NBC responsible for their fifth place ratings behind Univision.

    – Jay Leno

  2. Old Gator - Apr 10, 2013 at 11:57 PM

    Theo Epstein sleeps with the goats.

    • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 9:48 AM

      You see what’s happening here? As we go deeper into daylight, more and more folks who actually saw The Godfather are giving me thumbs up. Interesting demographic study of American sleeping habits….

  3. chill1184 - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:12 AM

    Sending threatening messages to ownership is really not the way to go about changing things

    • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 9:49 AM

      Correct. One needs to grab these owners by their platinum tiepins and beat the living crap out of them.

  4. larryboodry - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:15 AM

    Never thought I’d say this, but maybe the Cubs should say screw it to renovating Wrigley Field, and take Rosemont up on their offer…See how fast the rooftop owners and other Wrigleyville businesses (who’ve been getting rich off the Cubs for decades) go belly-up without the cash cows (fans) flooding the area every summer.

  5. andreweac - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:16 AM

    Stop killing poor animals.

    • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 7:10 AM

      The goat was already dead when it got there.

      • stlouis1baseball - Apr 11, 2013 at 11:43 AM

        The Galapagos Islands?

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:36 PM

        Yep. The islands have a problem with feral goats left there by sealers and whalers, who figured they’d breed and then the ships would have a ready source of meat on the islands when they sailed past. Unfortunately the goats have done a lot of environmental damage to the native foliage and are still abundant, so the Ecuadorian national parks people put a bounty on them. As a result, all the restaurants and eco-tourist boat provisioners in the islands’ two main towns, San Cristobal and Puerto Ayora, have plenty of goat meat on hand and the locals have developed a range of recipes, original and imported. A small harborside cafe in San Cristobal served us up that amazing stew I mention below, along with some of the best coffee I ever drank.

        We can find plenty of goat here in Macondo – aside from all the different Latino cuisines that use it, the local houngans and santeras breed them for sacrifice in their respective rituals. It’s probably the cheapest red meat you can buy down here – and, as Paperlions notes, when done right it’s mighty tasty.

        However, the coffee is harder to come by. It’s an arabica bean shade grown in some of the richest, most succulent volcanic soil on the planet, which somehow makes it a bit heartier yet smoother than your usual arabica. We order the stuff directly from two sources: Treefrog Coffee and The Coffee Fool. Treefrog is a bit more expensive but they’re fair trade, whereas Fool doesn’t make any statement about that. We use Treefrog most of the time, but when they’re occasionally out of stock we use The Fool. I strongly recommend, if you’re a wine snob about your coffee, that you get ahold of some and try it.

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:47 PM

        PS – da wife and I spent a two week honeymoon cruising the islands in a chartered 40-foot sailboat called the Bronzewing, which I think is actually still in use for private tours out of Puerto Ayora. Mind you this was over thirty years ago, and when we pulled into James Island the captain and his assistant went ashore with a rifle and bagged a goat for dinner while the guide took us hiking across the lava fields. We’re examining a patch of pahoehoe lava when we hear this BOOOOOOOMMMMMMMMMMM reverberate – and man, let me tell you, away from the areas of the island with foliage, that noise really shakes the air as it echoes off all the bare rock – and that, of course, was an omen of dinner. We had the goat a couple of nights later because the captain wanted to marinate the meat a bit, and it was just a pretty straightforward brown stew with yams, carrots and so forth, but boy was it good. The more highly developed and spiced version we had fifteen years later in San Cristobal, on our third trip to the islands as heretofore related, was, however, otherworldly.

    • paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 7:49 AM

      How do you know the goat was poor, might have been a middle class goat. Besides, goat is freaking tasty.

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 7:59 AM

        Indeed. We had a goat stew in the Galapagos Islands that rolled our eyes up in our heads. Of course, when we came to our wallets were missing, but, wow, what a dinner. I can’t duplicate that recipe since it contained native herbs that are probably illegal here, but I do have a great local one from down the street. Want Mama She’s infallible recipe for post-sacrificial cabrito?

      • paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 8:00 AM

        Sure, who doesn’t?

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 9:58 AM

        Mother She’s Lwa-Pleasing Post Sacrificial Goat Stew (for when the Lwa are happy, everyone is happy):

        2-1/2 lbs of goat meat cut into 3″ strips or pieces (it’s a good idea to roll the meat in cheesecloth and work it with a veal mallet and/or soak it in papaya nectar for a day in the fridge first).
        8 tablespoons of crushed garlic (if you can find the big Brazillian garlic bulbs, use those).
        4 tablespoons of ground yellow chili/pepper
        1 cup of olive or coconut oil
        1/2 onion, chopped
        1 tomato, skinned and seeded, chopped
        1 cup of hard apple cider or red wine
        9 oz of butternut squash
        1 1/2 cups of ground cilantro (absolutely critical!)
        3 yellow chili/peppers, seeded and coarsley chopped (use sweet peppers if you’re a wuss)
        7 oz of beans soaked from the previous day, or of canned white or cannelini beans
        3 cloves of garlic, minced
        1/2 teaspoon of dried oregano
        Kernels of 5 corns
        1/2 green bell pepper
        4 cups of cooked rice
        Corn husk or banana leaves
        Salt, pepper, cumin
        Preparation:

        Mix in a bowl the kid with four tablespoons of crushed garlic, ground yellow chili/pepper, salt, pepper and cumin. Cover and let marinate overnight in the refrigerator. Drain. Heat five tablespoons of oil in a skillet over medium heat and brown the pieces of kid. Reserve.

        Prepare a seasoning with four tablespoons of oil, half the onion, tomato and a tablespoon of crushed garlic in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the kid, chicha, squash, half cup of cilantro and two yellow peppers into strips. Let simmer for 30 minutes. Reserve.

        Cook the beans in a saucepan over medium heat covered with water for 45 minutes. In a skillet over medium heat, prepare a seasoning with two tablespoons of oil, remaining onion and the garlic. Add it to the beans, stir and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and sprinkle with oregano.

        Blend the corn, bell pepper, and remaining hot pepper and cilantro. Prepare a seasoning with the remaining oil and crushed garlic. Add it to the corn mixture and mix. Season with salt and pepper. Place two tablespoons of mass in each leaf and wrap.These are tamales! put them in a pot, cover with boiling water, cover and cook over medium heat for 20 minutes. Discard the water and let stand for 10 minutes.

        Serve the goat with rice, beans and tamales. Oooooooo, good.

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 10:09 AM

        Oops, my mistake – I lapse into local idiom if I overcontextualize myself sometimes. “Chicha” is the booze in the recipe.

      • paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 11:52 AM

        Thanks again.

        To clarify, are “5 corns”, 5 ears of corn?

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:25 PM

        No, those lumps growing on your toes….aww, of course I mean five ears of corn. I should change that to “two cups of medium-ground masa harina cornmeal.”

      • paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 1:21 PM

        Ha. Ha. Just wanted to make sure it wasn’t 5 oz of corn or something.

  6. joecool16280 - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:28 AM

    Someone find out where Mick Jagger was last night.

    Anyone under 38 might not get that.

    • Caught Looking - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:33 AM

      Wasn’t him. He was with Bowie.

    • deepstblu - Apr 11, 2013 at 6:24 AM

      When life gives you a goat’s head, make goat’s head soup.

      • paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 7:50 AM

        That was my first thought. Saaaweet! Free goats head, let’s make soup. Waste of a perfectly good goats head.

      • heyblueyoustink - Apr 11, 2013 at 8:12 AM

        If the person was classy, they would have sent Boar’s Head.

      • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 1:05 PM

        Ackcherley, if the were really classy, they would have sent a boar’s head to the funeral ceremony for Richard III in Leicester last weenter.

  7. surefooted1 - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:29 AM

    Look on the bright side. It’s better than him waking up to a horses head. lol

    • polonelmeagrejr - Apr 11, 2013 at 6:50 AM

      people that lol their own comments lola

  8. darrkkomens - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:48 AM

    Better than a horse’s Ass in a box..

    • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 8:00 AM

      They send those to Scrooge McLoria all the time. Not even news anymore.

  9. Stiller43 - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:54 AM

    The police responded to this? Seriously?

    • djpostl - Apr 11, 2013 at 1:41 AM

      You have a problem with them responding to a severed goats head being mailed to someone? Seriously?

      • fanofevilempire - Apr 11, 2013 at 6:51 AM

        many her have said you are a goat head ……

  10. stercuilus65 - Apr 11, 2013 at 3:00 AM

    Very b-a-a-a-a-a-d!

  11. paperlions - Apr 11, 2013 at 7:54 AM

    I love love LOVE that the story notes there was no return address? Really? No fucking shit, someone that dropped off a goat’s head in a package “addressed” to the owner (which probably just means it had his name the box Christmas gift style), didn’t leave a note, name, address, SS#, email address, and multiple phone numbers in case someone wanted to chat about the goat’s head? Well, that is just shocking.

    • fat4jc - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:57 PM

      I legit choked on my water while reading this.

  12. jaguar0413 - Apr 11, 2013 at 8:43 AM

    It only seems fair. The Cubs have been mailing their fans a big, steaming pile of shit every year for about the past 100.

  13. e5again - Apr 11, 2013 at 10:44 AM

    So was this a goat’s head like the horse head in the Godfather? Or was it just a goat’s head that you can get from a butcher?

    • Old Gator - Apr 11, 2013 at 12:50 PM

      Depends on whether or not someone’s neighbor is wondering what the hell happened to their pet goat’s head. Maybe it was the pet goat in My Pet Goat, which might account for some, but not all, of GWB’s perpetually confused look.

  14. thenaturalmevs - Apr 11, 2013 at 10:58 AM

    It was me

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