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Derek Jeter will not be returning on or around May 1

Apr 16, 2013, 6:31 PM EDT

derek jeter getty Getty Images

Jon Heyman of CBS Sports reported a little less than two weeks ago that “Yankees people” were targeting May 1 as a potential return date for injured shortstop Derek Jeter. But that’s not happening anymore.

According to MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch, Jeter is “not close to game action” and the Yankees are easing off any sort of projections for his return. “He’ll be back when he’s back,” manager Joe Girardi told reporters on Tuesday evening.

Jeter is taking daily rounds of batting practice and fielding ground balls at the Yankees’ spring training complex in Tampa, Florida, but his surgically-repaired left ankle is simply not where it needs to be.

  1. uyf1950 - Apr 16, 2013 at 6:44 PM

    Hopefully he’s on the mend sooner rather then later but in any case let him get completely healthy before he’s back in the line up.

  2. scrock25 - Apr 16, 2013 at 7:16 PM

    Right, next year.

    Poor guy. Too bad his career is starting to end like this.

  3. rbj1 - Apr 16, 2013 at 7:32 PM

    O Captain! My Captain!

  4. turdfurgerson68 - Apr 16, 2013 at 8:19 PM

    Kiss Pete Rose, Ty Cobb and 4000 hit territory goodbye…

    Can even the most extreme Jeter fans let it go now?

  5. maritime85 - Apr 16, 2013 at 8:45 PM

    Not where it needs to be? How the f do u work out a bone?

  6. ytownjoe - Apr 16, 2013 at 9:22 PM

    Maybe by the 4th of July?

  7. mybrunoblog - Apr 16, 2013 at 9:34 PM

    Memorial Day weekend. Maybe a week prior to that. Jeter….. You can’t stop him you can only try to contain him.

  8. fathersworkandfamily - Apr 16, 2013 at 10:25 PM

    Reblogged this on Fathers, Work and Family and commented:
    The First Paternity Leave of the 2013 Major League Baseball Season- The Oakland A’s Brandon Moss
    It is only 72 hours, but it’s a step in the right direction. Baseball’s policy, unique among major sports, represents a formal endorsement of the concept of paternity leave.
    Prior to this policy, players were often excused for a day or two by their teams- but it was totally at management’s discretion, and the team would have to play with the disadvantage of one fewer player on the roster until the new dad returned.
    Now, teams can call up a player from their minor league system to replace the new dad on the roster for the 2-3 games he misses and the team cannot deny up to a 72-hour leave.
    … and, of course, congratulations to Brandon Moss and his wife!

    • jwbiii - Apr 16, 2013 at 10:34 PM

      Wrong thread but good sentiment.

  9. historiophiliac - Apr 16, 2013 at 10:30 PM

    Doom!

  10. buffalomafia - Apr 17, 2013 at 6:14 AM

    They said during Yankees game that he is fine & is taking BP & 20 ground balls?

    • historiophiliac - Apr 17, 2013 at 7:28 AM

      BTW, I did enjoy the little contest they had the other night when I was watching the Yanks game. The point was to pick which player was set to come back from the DL first. I’m NOT kidding. It was tragically hilarious.

  11. kellea15 - Apr 17, 2013 at 7:29 AM

    Unfortunately father time waits for nobody…

  12. daniel10017 - Apr 17, 2013 at 8:26 AM

    Why don’t the Yankees and Jeter finally admit what we have known all along: That he’s finished. It’s time for Jeter to retire. There’s no shame in that. He had a hell of a run.

  13. dinkydow - Apr 17, 2013 at 11:58 AM

    Bobby Valentine was a very good player until he broke his ankle. He was never the same player after. Jeter is a proud, all out type of player. If he can’t perform the way he did last year and the way he has throughout his great career, I think he may hang them up.

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