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Mets minor leaguer suspended

Apr 23, 2013, 5:03 PM EST

Rachel Leigh Cook

I wish they’d reveal whether “drug of abuse” is marijuana or something actually harmful. Would totally change the way I view these things:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball announced today that New York Mets Minor League right-handed pitcher Christian Montgomery has received a 50-game suspension without pay after a second violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program for a drug of abuse.

The suspension of Montgomery, who is on the roster of the rookie-level Kingsport Mets of the Appalachian League, will be effective at the start of the Appalachian League season.

On the bright side, that’s 50 games he doesn’t have to spend in Kingsport.

  1. historiophiliac - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:18 PM

    Appalachian League? Then it’s moonshine.

    • oltanya - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:20 PM

      As someone who lives in Johnson City, half an hour from Kingsport, Montgomery wouldn’t have had to drive far to find a treasure trove of meth.

      Hat tip to Calcaterra, though; nobody wants to spend any time in the Kingsport smell. Mmm, paper plant.

  2. jeffa43 - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:25 PM

    So team execs called a meeting, had a couple of beers and tried to figure out how to deal with the serious harm that’s been done. I don’t get being punished for something as harmful as eating fruit you grew… But consume all the liquid poison you can!

    Maybe his arm or legs were hurting?
    Don’t take the natural, zero toxin, God given medicinal plant!
    Take the addictive, proven killer, Vicodin!

    • dowhatifeellike - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:47 PM

      There’s nothing medicinal about pot. It makes you feel good. That’s all.

      Most painkillers are derived from plants anyway – ever hear of opiates?

      • jeffa43 - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:50 PM

        So… Do you work for big pharma? Or are you just stupid?

      • dowhatifeellike - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:00 PM

        Those are really the only options, aren’t they? Everyone who disagrees must be dumb or have an agenda, amirite?

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:13 PM

        What possible motive would a private citizen have for defending a dangerous, addictive, deadly, and WIDELY abused option over a much safer, healthier alternative?

        That’s the only reason we have this discussion….because the marijuana lobby can’t overcome the pharmaceutical lobby or the financial benefits involved in charging and fining people for a 100% victimless crime.

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:15 PM

        And, for the record….there’s nothing “medicinal” about painkillers aside from the fact that they….you know….kill pain.

        What they DON’T do is increase appetite for people undergoing Chemo. Marijuana does. That would be a medicinal benefit.

        But of course, they have other DRUGS on the market that can do the same thing half as well for ten times the cost.

      • thebadguyswon - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:23 PM

        I agree. Marijuana as medicine is a joke. Alcohol is medicine then too.

      • dowhatifeellike - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:24 PM

        tf, since when is being against pot mean someone is pro-pharma? I don’t use either.

        No, dulling pain is not a medicinal quality. Stimulating an appetite is not either. Neither of them have any direct, restorative quality on the human body. They are tangental benefits. If someone can fight through their pain, they can fight down a sandwich, too.

      • dondada10 - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:33 PM

        I suffer from anxiety. Prescription meds make me lethargic and vapid. Marijuana makes me…what were we talking about?

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:23 PM

        Are you SERIOUS right now?

        Stimulating the appetite of someone who is wasting away because they can’t keep food down IS ABSOLUTELY restorative to the body because it HELPS THEM NOURISH THEIR BODY.

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:30 PM

        And another thing….it’s anecdotal, naturally….but personally, I can get pretty high strung and have a touch of an anxiety disorder….

        But when I smoke pot regularly, even when I’m not high, I am the calmest, most easy-going individual you will ever meet.

        Those aspects of my personality aren’t problematic enough that I’d seek out DRUGS to alter them, nor are they problematic enough that I smoke pot all the time for that reason….but the fact is, those diminish not just slightly….ENTIRELY, for me, when I have a consistent level of THC in my body.

        If you don’t think that’s a shitload better than someone being permanently on Xanax or anti-psychotic or any other meds that alter the brain chemistry in often unpredictable ways you’re nuts.

        Ditto for people who suffer from CHRONIC pain and HAVE to have the pain dulled just to be able to move. Painkillers destroy your liver, and have diminished effects over time which makes you have to up your dosage (I watched one of my grandfathers suffer from a severe opiate addiction because of a broken back and the pain he suffered from for 40 years). It’s a vicious cycle that can be avoided completely but for one archaic and pointless law that’s only purpose was locking up black people and protecting the paper industry almost 100 years ago.

      • dondada10 - Apr 23, 2013 at 9:41 PM

        I never realized we had so much in common. You are my HBT brother forever, buckfutter.

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 9:58 PM

        I’ll post something dumb when I’m drunk that will piss you off.

        It’s generally advisable to not hold too fast and strong to any one opinion of someone on the internet.

      • thebadguyswon - Apr 24, 2013 at 12:18 AM

        A lot of fucking potheads here, clearly.

      • badintent - Apr 24, 2013 at 3:07 AM

        Make pot legal, take the criminal element out of it. Then tax it, tax it some more.For states and cities. Then line up all the POS CEOs of big Tobbaco that lied to Congress about addictive chemicals not being in ciggarettes and SHOOT ALL OF THEM. My mother died of liver cancer at age 50 from smoking 2 packs of Winstons for 36 years. God blessher, but she never had a chance.

      • blacksables - Apr 24, 2013 at 5:14 AM

        My mother died of cancer after smoking 4-packs a day for 50 years.

        I remember her telling me about the day someone put a gun to her head and forced her to smoke her first cigarette.

        And every time she tried to stop, how that same guy came to her house and put the gun to her head and forced her to keep smoking.

        Lack of will power and refusal to take responsibility for your actions is just as addictive as anything put in cigarettes. Can I sue the human race for killing my mother?

  3. Stiller43 - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:33 PM

    “I wish they’d reveal whether “drug of abuse” is marijuana or something actually harmful. Would totally change the way I view these things:”

    Im not one to demonize pot and portray it as this terrible evil…(i dont do it, but i dont care if others do) BUT Craig, it IS illegal (and even im states its not, its still against baseball rules), regardless of what you think of it. And no, you dont deserve to know what it was for either.

    • jeffa43 - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:40 PM

      My 43 is also for Troy P….

      If its going to be made public, tell the public which it is… In the badeball world it will be assumed P.E.D. Which can hurt him in contract talks, the other will soon be viewed as less harmful than beer.

      J. Singleton of the Stros was just busted for pot… Club is not worried that his power is fake, as he was not popped for ped. They even said that in public.

      • dowhatifeellike - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:45 PM

        They name the PED (if that’s what turned up) but don’t name the drug of abuse, so that distinction is already made. Last week’s report named Stanozolol as the PED in use.

    • genericcommenter - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:47 PM

      Speeding is illegal too. If we find out someone has a speeding ticket, we usually don’t start moralizing or judging their character. Lots of things are illegal.

      Most of us commit a few felonies every day.

      • blacksables - Apr 24, 2013 at 5:17 AM

        You do understand the difference between misdemeanors and felonies, don’t you?

      • thebadguyswon - Apr 24, 2013 at 7:06 AM

        Ah….that would be a negative.

  4. dowhatifeellike - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:38 PM

    I’m going to start looking forward to these if you keep using that picture.

  5. robmar924 - Apr 23, 2013 at 5:58 PM

    Swank. 10 times more addictive than marijuana

  6. therealtrenches - Apr 23, 2013 at 6:43 PM

    You people arguing that marijuana has no “actual” medicinal value and is no different than alcohol are truly uninformed. You literally do not know what you are talking about.

    But at the moment, marijuana is still illegal.

    And so Craig, while I agree that it would be nice to know which drug we’re talking about when a player is suspended for violating the substance abuse policy, I wouldn’t have a problem with the league suspending a player if he was in possession of a significant amount of pot, simply because he’s breaking the law.

    Do I agree with the law? That’s another story for another day. But that day hasn’t arrived yet.

    • genericcommenter - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:48 PM

      If players were suspending for breaking any law no players would ever be on the field. Even if you narrow that being caught breaking the law, it would still be significant.

  7. onbucky96 - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:23 PM

    Rachel Lee Cook needs to make some bacon with those eggs…

  8. genericcommenter - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:51 PM

    If a guy was drafted 2 years ago and still in Rookie Ball, with 2 positive drug tests, I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s done anyway.

  9. bigjimatch - Apr 23, 2013 at 7:59 PM

    Weed is harmful, its just not any more harmful than legal drugs.

    • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 8:27 PM

      Harmful how?

    • jeffa43 - Apr 23, 2013 at 8:33 PM

      You would be the first to answer that question… So curious, please tell us how it is harmful?

    • nothanksimdriving123 - Apr 24, 2013 at 12:49 AM

      Whether a substance is harmful is not the crucial issue (drinking bleach is a very bad choice, but isn’t illegal). The war against recreational drugs is based on 2 extremely flawed underlying concepts. 1) That it could possibly be a reasonable function of government to punish informed adults for choosing to ingest whatever chemicals they wish to. Protect vulnerable people, especially children, from harm, of course, but leave adults alone, provided they behave responsibly and don’t harm others. 2) That it could possibly be a good idea to deal with the real problem of substance abuse through the criminal justice system. It is not. It keeps people from seeking help. And the war fosters official corruption, gang violence, prison overcrowding, and wastes billions of tax dollars annually, among other problems.

  10. bigjimatch - Apr 23, 2013 at 9:20 PM

    Short term side effects include decreased reaction time, which can impair driving, operating heavy machinery, etc.

    Long term, peer reviewed studies have found that heavy MJ use over a long period of time to be harmful to to the brain, including decreased memory function and IQ. intersting, the studies define heavy use as more than 5 joints a week, which is a pretty a low standard.

    While not nearly as bad a cigarettes, burning any organic compound, including cannabis, releases carcinogens and can lead to irritation of the respiratory system.

    There are other studies on other side effects, some more serious than others, several disputed, many inconclusive.

    I could go one, but are do you really think smoking weed has zero harmful effects?

    • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 10:04 PM

      Long term side effects on the brain aren’t accurate, because you have to take into account that many heavy users become heavy users in their early-to-mid teens when their brains are developing, and it can have an effect on that.

      And as for the carcinogens….there have also been studies that show that marijuana smoking actually decrease the chances of lung cancer because they promote unhealthy cells to die off and shed rather than linger and become cancerous. I’m not doing the research now, but I have seen that cited more than once. I can’t promise it wasn’t an urban legend, but like I said, I have read it in more than a few places. I’m also pretty sure those long term effects diminish once use of the “drug” is ceased.

      That aside, though….you realize there are other methods of ingestion, particularly vaporization which negates all the potential risks to the respiratory system.

      And as for short term side effects cited….wearing a blind fold can impair driving and operating heavy machinery too. So, I think it would be advisable that one not try to do either of those while wearing a blindfold….but I don’t think it’s necessary to ban strips of fabric between 1 and 3 inches wide with a length of at least 16 inches.

      • bigjimatch - Apr 23, 2013 at 11:25 PM

        “Long term side effects on the brain aren’t accurate, because you have to take into account that many heavy users become heavy users in their early-to-mid teens when their brains are developing, and it can have an effect on that.”

        Yea, that’s my point. I don’t think smoking weed should be a crime, but its not “harmless.”

        “you realize there are other methods of ingestion, particularly vaporization which negates all the potential risks to the respiratory system.”

        When vaporization and/or eating marijuana becomes the predominate method of delivering THC we can ignore the side effects of smoking. Short of that, there are few unbiased studies on the short and term effects of weed on respiratory health and other side effects, mostly because it wither the government trying to justify keeping it illegal, or groups trying to show it should not be illegal. I think the long term effect are unclear enough that it should be labeled harmless.

        “wearing a blind fold can impair driving and operating heavy machinery too”

        True, but would you agree that wearing a blindfold while driving is not “harmless”?

        Like I said, I don’t think weed should be a crime, and it has many beneficial uses, but that does not mean its not harmful, especially in young people, as you point out. In the effort relax marijuana laws, a lot of information is put out there making it sound like some risk free wonder drug, and nothing bad ever happens as a result of MJ use. I don’t think that is the right message either.

      • tfbuckfutter - Apr 23, 2013 at 11:51 PM

        But suggesting the effects of it on TEENAGERS should be factored into the effects on legal adults is like saying “Alcohol is a deadly substance” and leaving out that you are basing that on the evidence that giving a baby 5 ounces of whiskey will kill it (don’t ask how I know that….ok, I made it up, but it sounds like the right amount for killing a baby).

        And I wouldn’t even factor whether wearing a blindfold while driving was or wasn’t harmless because it’s not a reasonable point to argue….which was my point in bringing it up. It’s two actions that a reasonable person wouldn’t combine. So it doesn’t raise the level of “harmfulness” of “wearing a blindfold” in general. Just like other peripheral acts don’t raise the level of harmfulness of smoking marijuana…..If you smoke marijuana and then enter a karate tournament you’ll probably get hurt so that should be qualified as a harmful side effect of smoking marijuana. “Warning: Don’t juggle excessively sharp knives after consuming this product” should probably be on packages of joints when they are finally available at the local 7-11.

  11. notsofast10 - Apr 23, 2013 at 10:54 PM

    He is in Rookie League….. without pay????? That will cost him a fortune!

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