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The last remaining teammates of some all-time greats

May 13, 2013, 11:03 AM EST

Lou Gehrig grave

First there was Neil Young’s “ditch trilogy.” Now we have Chris Jaffe’s “morbid trilogy.”

First, he looked at who lived the longest time after playing in a World Series. Then he looked at the last surviving men to have played for some important managers.  Now he’s looking at who were the last surviving teammates of some of the game’s all-time greats:

The most recent all-time great to have no living teammates is the Iron Horse, Lou Gehrig. The disease that killed him forced him to retire in 1939. An outfielder for that club was Tommy Henrich, who died on Dec. 1, 2009. He was the last Yankee left who heard Gehrig say that he considered himself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. The day Gehrig gave his famous speech, Henrich appeared as a pinch-hitter for the Yankees and made an out.

Beyond that factoid there are all kinds of neat ones that make one realize (a) how long baseball has been played; and (b) how long a human life is, even if we all tend to blow off things that happen in our day-to-day existence with phrases like “life’s too short to …”

  1. cggarb - May 13, 2013 at 11:40 AM

    He’s not a player, but Bernie Stowe, the Reds clubhouse man, has been on the job since 1947. He shined Bucky Walters’ shoes.

  2. skids003 - May 13, 2013 at 12:20 PM

    It’s not morbid, Craig. It’s people who were actual witnesses to what we now call history. I think it’s great.

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