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Andy Pettitte exits start with tight left trapezius muscle

May 16, 2013, 9:52 PM EDT

Andy Pettitte Getty Getty Images

UPDATE: The Yankees just announced that Andy Pettitte left tonight’s start with a tight left trapezius muscle. That’s the upper back and neck area. It’s not clear whether he’ll need to miss any time.

9:24 PM: Here’s a potentially troubling development for the first-place Yankees.

According to Bryan Hoch of MLB.com, Andy Pettitte left tonight’s start against the Mariners in the fifth inning with an apparent injury. The veteran southpaw appeared to be in some discomfort after he struck out Jason Bay and Kyle Seager to begin the frame. He was pulled from the ballgame after being visited by Yankees manager Joe Girardi and a team trainer.

No word yet on the exact nature of the injury, but it’s worth noting that Pettitte was skipped from a start last month due to back spasms.

Pettitte allowed two runs on four hits and three walks over 4 2/3 innings before exiting. The 40-year-old has a 3.83 ERA and 39/15 K/BB ratio in 49 1/3 innings over eight starts this season.

  1. aceshigh11 - May 16, 2013 at 9:29 PM

    Bummer…he’s been really solid for them this year.

    • polonelmeagrejr - May 17, 2013 at 8:43 AM

      A real shocker – old man has cranky back.

  2. halladayslabia - May 16, 2013 at 9:37 PM

    Does baseball exist west of the Mississippi?

    • tuberippin - May 17, 2013 at 12:02 AM

      Yeah. That’s where the 2010 and 2012 World Series champions reside, for one (and I strongly dislike the Giants).

      • jwbiii - May 17, 2013 at 3:59 PM

        The 2011 champs, too (and I strongly dislike the Cardinals, but respect where it is due).

  3. proudlycanadian - May 16, 2013 at 9:45 PM

    I am obviously not a Yankee fan, but I am shocked by the number of NY injuries this season. So far, the team has responded extremely well.

    • proudlycanadian - May 16, 2013 at 10:09 PM

      And now Chris Stewart seems to be hurt.

      • pharmdocmark - May 17, 2013 at 9:19 AM

        who? Seriously, who?

      • proudlycanadian - May 17, 2013 at 9:22 AM

        If you are really serious, I suggest a Google search.

    • 18thstreet - May 17, 2013 at 9:10 AM

      Is it really shocking when an old team has a lot of injuries? I’ve been hammering away at the Youkilis signing from the beginning, but there was no reason at all to believe that Youkilis would play more than 80 or so games at third this year. None. And, without looking it up or giving it a TON of though, there was no reason to think Andy Pettitte wasn’t going to strain something serious at some point. No way on earth he was going to make 35 starts. None.

  4. halladayslabia - May 16, 2013 at 10:09 PM

    Justin Verlander gave up 8 earned in less than 3 IP. This is a pretty big story too. But it happened outside the East, so it will not be covered until we know what color Bryce Harper’s underwear is, and who the Red Sox plan to have close until Bailey is ready next week.

    • aceshigh11 - May 16, 2013 at 11:24 PM

      Wow, 8 runs in 2 2/3 for Verlander…talk about an ultra-rare occurrence.

      So much for the pitcher’s duel everyone was anticipating. I guess even the best can have an off night.

  5. mc1439 - May 16, 2013 at 10:24 PM

    I know this isn’t even in the top 20 wishes for Astros fans but I wish we never let him go…. I don’t even know why I do this to myself

    • paperlions - May 17, 2013 at 7:27 AM

      It wasn’t a question of “letting him go”. Free agents have this thing called “choice”, even though most choose not to use it and instead just take the biggest check. Pettitted said he would only pitch again for the Yankees. The Astros didn’t actually have a choice in the matter.

      • mc1439 - May 17, 2013 at 8:22 AM

        No shit he had a choice. The Astros let him go because they didn’t match the Yankee’s offer, or give him a little more (which would have been worth it) THEN he WOULD HAVE STAYED to play for the Astros. But they thought they were smarter by not spending money on a sure thing and traded for a dead beat Jason Jennings to replace a sure thing. Quit creating an artifical opportunity to sound smart and pamper yourself without all the facts you fucking douchebag.

      • paperlions - May 17, 2013 at 9:11 AM

        No, he wouldn’t have stayed. Feel free to cite one source that says Pettitte would have stayed in Houston if they offered him more money.

        Pettitte hasn’t pitched for the Astros for 7 years. There is no scenario in which he would have still been there this year or last…and he retired in 2011.

        Feel free to provide facts as you continue to act like a complete fucking asshole.

      • mc1439 - May 17, 2013 at 10:32 AM

        Oh the old “I know you don’t feel like digging for sources so I’m gonna make you post one and if you don’t that automatically means I’m right tactic.” I’ve been following the Astros religiously since 2002 and I’m not even implying I wanted Pettite this year or last you twat. If we had him for his remaining seasons 07 08 09 after we let him go (we did by the way, we let him go) the Astros franchise might be in a little better shape because of it. You’re deluded impulse to automatically assume I even implied I wished he was here for the past two years instead of 07 08 09 just proves you tried to franticallly fit some dipshit timeline in my reasoning. Good luck find your source bitch cuz I know I’m right.

      • jwbiii - May 17, 2013 at 4:23 PM

        “Pettitte would have re-signed with the Astros for $14 million and an option, but the Astros never budged from their $12 million offer”

        http://www.chron.com/sports/astros/article/Pettitte-heading-back-to-Yankees-1669455.php

        He would have stayed with Houston if they had offered him $2M less than the Yankees, but not for $4M less.

      • jwbiii - May 17, 2013 at 4:34 PM

        By the way, if someone had been religiously following the Astros for a decade, do you think that s/he would be able to spell Pettitte’s name right?

      • mc1439 - May 17, 2013 at 4:54 PM

        So jwbiii you prove I am right and then try to discredit me because I can’t spell his name? According to your logic you can only be a fan of a team if you know exactly how to spell everyone’s name who has been on the roster since said person claimed to be a fan. My case 2002. Without looking it up is it Bourn or Bourne. I don’t know and I don’t give a shit because I’m not a spelling Nazi and I don’t make inferring claims in the most ridiculous way to sound smart. Something you and paperlions have.

  6. djpostl - May 16, 2013 at 11:44 PM

    Somebody say trapezius muscle?

    http://photos.imageevent.com/supplex55/vintagewwfcolorpromophotos19841998/88%20mon%20clr

  7. bigharold - May 17, 2013 at 2:48 AM

    “Here’s a potentially troubling development for the first-place Yankees.”

    Really?? As opposed to EVERY other development for the Yankees concerning injuries this season?

    First Pettette, now Stewart?? So what?? These are the 2013 New York Yankees.’ Bring it on!!

    • aceshigh11 - May 17, 2013 at 6:59 AM

      “Great, kid…don’t get cocky.” – Han Solo

      The Yanks have done an amazing job so far with a team held together by duct tape, but don’t think things can’t come unmoored fast…it’s still relatively early in the season.

  8. rockthered1286 - May 17, 2013 at 9:24 AM

    I’m impressed. I really am. How the Yanks have managed to not only stay afloat but succeed to this point is astounding. That being said, how insane would it be to see all of the “star players” come back and they falter? Would they start dumping bodies/salary and go back to this make-shift team of scrappy has-beens and never-waseses? Could be an interesting development if things take that turn…

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