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Nationals place Stephen Strasburg on the disabled list

Jun 5, 2013, 4:40 PM EDT

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Stephen Strasburg tested his strained lat muscle by throwing a bullpen session this afternoon and it went poorly enough that the Nationals have placed him on the disabled list.

Because the move is backdated to Strasburg’s last start Friday he’ll be eligible to come off the disabled list on June 16. In the meantime Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com reports that the Nationals aren’t sure who’ll fill in for Strasburg this weekend, in part because Ross Detwiler won’t be ready to return from an oblique injury of his own yet.

Before leaving Friday’s start after just two innings Strasburg had thrown 72 innings with a 2.49 ERA and 71/21 K/BB ratio this season, including a 0.96 ERA in his last four outings.

  1. specialkindofstupid - Jun 5, 2013 at 4:49 PM

    Well, better to DL him than have him go out there not feeling right, try to compensate by altering his delivery, and then suffer a more serious injury. Still, somewhere out there Rob Dibble is probably calling Strasburg a very unflattering name.

  2. mc1439 - Jun 5, 2013 at 4:55 PM

    I’m sorry (not really) but you guys really screwed up by not having him pitch in the postseason. Once you get there you just need to do whatever it takes to win. Obviously having a inning limit didn’t do shit for him.

    • brazcubas - Jun 5, 2013 at 5:26 PM

      I’m pretty sure the Nationals were well aware that shutting him down to protect his arm was not going to do anything to prevent abdominal injuries. Or, for that matter, prevent him from being hit by a meteorite, or held hostage by runaway circus animals.

      Now, if you’re talking about some sort of Karmic retribution by the baseball gods, then I absolutely agree with you . . . . totally, no doubt about it.

    • beebopthearcher - Jun 5, 2013 at 6:19 PM

      I hugely disagreed with the shutdown, but at the end of the day, it made no difference. The Nationals won the game he would have started and lost the series. It turned out to not have any effect on their postseason, so let’s just drop it, shall we?

      • thebadguyswon - Jun 5, 2013 at 7:38 PM

        I love that logic. “They won the game he would have started.”

        Jesus people…..had they not imposed their ridiculous rule, a self-imposed rule that no other playoff team had ever done – they would have had Strasburg for game 5 in relief. Seems to me they could have used him.

        But hey – Mike Rizzo is a genius. Clearly taking out your best pitcher is a great idea. Mike Rizzo for President in ’16!

      • beebopthearcher - Jun 5, 2013 at 9:33 PM

        IN what universe would the Nationals have gone to Strausberg in the 9th?

        Do you know why the Nationals lost? A freak of nature occured that happens rarely in baseball. I don’t who is on the mound, 99% of the time, the Cardinals lose that game. Espinosa makes that play, someone swings at one of those borderline pitches. For better or worse, an element of luck comes into play in baseball. The Nationals luck was that the Cardinals pulled magic out of their ass (again) on the brink of elimination.

        That’s it. That’s what happened. It had nothing to do with Stephen Strausberg.

  3. thekingdave - Jun 5, 2013 at 5:13 PM

    It’s all good. As evidenced by last season’s “shutdown”, the Nats have a nucleus the likes of which baseball has never seen. They are guaranteed nothing but success the next decade.

    • thebadguyswon - Jun 5, 2013 at 7:38 PM

      Yes….as I said last fall, the 1990’s Pittsburgh Pirates say hello.

  4. DelawarePhilliesFan - Jun 5, 2013 at 5:38 PM

    Wow, 160 innings already?

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