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Dodgers making progress on extension with Clayton Kershaw

Jun 15, 2013, 11:00 PM EDT

Clayton Kershaw Getty Getty Images

Ken Rosenthal reports that the Dodgers are making progress with starter Clayton Kershaw on a seven-year contract extension worth in excess of $180 million. The 25-year-old left-hander enters his third and final year of arbitration going into 2014 after which he would be eligible for free agency. That the Dodgers would eventually sign Kershaw to an extension seemed inevitable; the only question was the exact amount of cash involved.

Kershaw’s contract will be based in no small part on those signed recently by Tigers ace Justin Verlander (seven years, $180 million) and Mariners ace Felix Hernandez (seven years, $175 million).

Assuming the first year of the contract would be near the average annual value ($25-26 million), the Dodgers would owe $20 million or more to five players going into the 2014 season: Kershaw, Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Matt Kemp, and Zack Greinke. Their 2014 payroll already stands at $163 million without factoring in the arbitration eligibility of Kershaw and potentially four other players.

Kershaw has a league-best 1.88 ERA on the season and led the NL in that category in each of the previous two seasons as well, winning the Cy Young in 2011 and finishing as the runner-up to R.A. Dickey last year.

  1. chill1184 - Jun 15, 2013 at 11:03 PM

    Kershaw going to get paid

  2. Dan Camponovo - Jun 15, 2013 at 11:10 PM

    It’s absolutely absurd he’s only 25. 7 year pitcher contracts are terrifying — Verlander’s already (arguably) beginning his age-30 decline period. Kershaw, and to a lesser extent Hernandez, is going to be right in his prime for the majority of the contract.

    • aceshigh11 - Jun 16, 2013 at 11:14 AM

      What’s going to be really difficult is how to deal with him when he’s 32.

      Presuming he puts up brilliant numbers for the bulk of those seven years, his agent’s going to want another big payday, even though by age 32, it’ll be a major risk.

  3. yahmule - Jun 16, 2013 at 12:12 AM

    Great player, great person. He deserves every good thing that comes his way.

  4. decimusprime - Jun 16, 2013 at 12:58 AM

    Worth every penny!!

  5. gothapotamus90210 - Jun 16, 2013 at 2:26 AM

    8 / 215, running from 2014 through 2021 AAV would be just shy of $27M per year, beating Verlander’s AAV by about $1m. Deal would include option for 2022 of $26M, with $7M buyout, which could bring deal to 9 / 234.

  6. ch0psuey - Jun 16, 2013 at 2:51 AM

    Way too much money. So many people could be helped with that amount…..

    • yahmule - Jun 16, 2013 at 5:39 AM

      Dig deep.

      http://www.kershawschallenge.com/giving/

    • gothapotamus90210 - Jun 16, 2013 at 8:24 AM

      So it would be better it the owners of the Dodgers would keep all the money, instead of paying Kershaw, so they could have it in their bank accounts?

      It’s supply and demand. For whatever reason, baseball is in high demand by consumers, it provides entertainment value. To create that value, a team needs to have good “employees”. In this case, Kershaw has a skill set which there is a limited supply for, so he will be paid what the market deems his worth to be.

      If you don’t like it, don’t watch. Tune into the Sally Struthers’ commercials and send your $0.52 per day.

  7. onbucky96 - Jun 16, 2013 at 2:18 PM

    Bling bling. Hey LA, when you get that massive increase for your cable bill, just check out the FOX TV deal and how much the Dodgers are paying these guys.

  8. dexterismyhero - Jun 17, 2013 at 7:37 AM

    I thought we were not talking about this? Oh, that is a later story. Sorry.

    /s

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