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Chris Davis denies PED use

Jul 12, 2013, 11:32 AM EDT

Chris Davis AP

It’s sad that he even has to — his words: “it sucks” — but Chris Davis does feel that he has to deny PED accusations. And that he did to the Baltimore Sun:

“I have never taken them. I have no reason to. I’ve always been a power hitter. With me, I think the biggest thing was the consistency of the contact … When I was making contact, I was always hitting for power. I’m a guy that likes to work out a lot. I’m a guy that used to eat whatever I wanted to, but I started getting into my mid-20s, I’ve been seeing that change. So I’ve been taking better care of my body. I have a pretty strict diet. But I’ve never taken [performance-enhancing drugs]. I haven’t felt the need to.”

All of that will be for naught of course. People who like to write the “questions remain …” story are the same people who raise the questions, and that’s a feedback loop that is immune to external data.

  1. unclemosesgreen - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:34 AM

    As long as Orange Crush stays off the banned list he will stay clean.

    • skids003 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:01 PM

      I hope he’s clean, he seems like a good guy. If Orange Crush was a PED, I’d be hitting 80 a year?!!

  2. southpaw2k - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:37 AM

    Why is it that only batters who have career years have to confront accusations of juicing? Do people not notice or care about pitchers who have equally great years and not question their integrity? I’m not trying to accuse any one pitcher specifically, but it amazes me that idiots like the kid on Twitter and Rick Reilly have confronted Chris Davis about juicing, but nobody bats an eye at the likes of Max Scherzer who’s equally dominant this year.

    And the real irony is, it’s been the pitchers who were much more documented at cheating over the years than the hitters prior to the onset of PEDs anyway.

    • psuorioles - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:55 AM

      Rick Reilly is an a$$ and only does does those types of things to get a response…

      • southpaw2k - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:00 PM

        Completely agree with you on Reilly, but Davis is far from the first guy who’s had to deal with accusations of using PEDs because he’s having a career year. The big question is why don’t pitchers have to deal with questions like these more often? And haven’t pitchers been the ones busted for PED use more than hitters have since MLB put their drug-testing practice into place a few years ago (obviously Palmeiro, Manny and Cabrera are notable exceptions)?

    • kopy - Jul 12, 2013 at 2:17 PM

      The next time someone says Roger Maris or Hank Aaron is the real holder of their respective broken records, ask them if they know who had the consecutive saves streak before Eric Gagne.

    • stuckonwords - Jul 13, 2013 at 8:39 AM

      I agree that the pitchers get more of a pass because the hitters’ power numbers make it so easy to pick them out. I’m a card-carrying member of the “Roger Clemens is trash” club. But it really bums me out to see Max Scherzer’s name come up in the same sentence as PEDs. You really have to look at the guy’s career numbers and his trends; in other words, you should do your homework before just throwing a guy’s name out there like that.

      Max has always been a flame-throwing, raw talent. When he came over from Arizona, both teams were really high on his potential, and at 28 years old it’s entirely understandable that he’s hitting his prime. He’s progressively gotten better every year, particularly since his dawn of realization that he understands that he must keep his walks down. He started out last year a little rough, then progressively improved. By the 2nd half of the season he started to roll. You wanna say he suddenly started taking PEDs mid-season?

      This year he’s had 18 starts, only walking more than 2 batters three times. He’s added a curve ball, which coupled with the 97mph fastball he’s always had and the change-up that he’s always considered his best pitch, hitters just can’t handle the added curve to the arsenal. And yeah…he’s got a great slider, too.

      And don’t forget that he’s had the highest run support of any pitcher in the league. Yes, most times he doesn’t need that help, but it has covered the four times he’s given up more than three runs, and even the three times he gave up 3.

      So while I agree that pitchers should be watched just as much as the hitters, I ask that we look before we leap, because you can’t unring that bell, as they say, and throwing Max’s name out there “just because” does him an injustice.

      • southpaw2k - Jul 15, 2013 at 9:01 AM

        In a way, you’re making my point for me. I’m not trying to drag Scherzer’s name through the mud, nor do I think he’s using any kind of PED’s. He’s having a great season thus far, and I hope he keeps up his momentum through the second half. I merely used his name as a reference to make my point that there are pitchers who have great individual seasons just as hitters do, but baseball writers and fans in general never stop to question their integrity the way they do hitters.

        I hope this clarifies my original point, because the last thing I’d want to do is unjustly imply or accuse a player of juicing when there is no evidence to suggest otherwise.

  3. baseballici0us - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:38 AM

    Players like Davis should hire (or the team should pay for it) third-party testers so they can shove it on people’s face that they are clean.

    • baseballici0us - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:39 AM

      That said, it’s sad to have to even suggest they do that.

    • bigharold - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:10 PM

      That would be a complete waste of time. Lance Armstrong never failed a test and the only way he was caught was everybody he ever rode with rolled over on him.

      Testing clean will not change anybodies mind. But, frankly the players have only themselves to blame for this situation. It wasn’t so much a few abusers, .. it was, at one time, the widespread wholesale PED culture that makes people believe that it’s still going on. Most people believe that A-Rod is still using PEDs but he’s passed every screening for 10 years.

      I don’t think Davis has used PEDs andcertainly there is no to link him to PEDs but his statement; ” But I’ve never taken [performance-enhancing drugs]. I haven’t felt the need to.”” Is exactly what A-Rod said in an interview with 60 minutes about two years before it was leaked that he was on the 2003 list. And, regardless of what people think about him today at the time A-Rod was arguably the best player in baseball. So why should people trust what Davis or any baseball player say? Why should they believe that just because he doesn’t fail a test he’s clean?

      I’ve come to the conclusion that unless there is hard evidence a player has taken PEDs, like a failed screening, he’s clean. Because there is no point in thinking otherwise. It a question that can’t be resolved with any reasonable satisfaction. It’s like speeding. If I didn’t get a ticket,, .. I wasn’t speeding. And, the fact that my speedo read 70-75 MPH the entire way home is irrelevant. But, the reason players like Davis, .. in fact all players, .. are suspect is because of the players that engaged in widespread PEDs abuse.

  4. specialkindofstupid - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:40 AM

    Seems like a genuine, thoughtful response to an unnecessary, silly question.

    Gentlemen, get out your pitch forks. The man is clearly hiding something.

    • 18thstreet - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:30 PM

      That’s exactly what someone who uses steroids would say! I have questions about SpecialKindofStupid, and they must be asked.

      • nolanwiffle - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:49 PM

        Agreed! The man is flaunting his IRD (intelligence reducing drug) use right in our collective face! “Special” kind of stupid, indeed!

  5. psuorioles - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:48 AM

    It’s a shame he has to answer those questions, but it’s the baseball world we live in right now…

  6. @Cereal_22 - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:48 AM

    I hope you all are enjoying Bud Selig’s horror flick, this is his monster

    • chip56 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:17 PM

      This isn’t Bud’s fault, what should he have done, told Congress to go screw itself when they insisted that baseball clean up the sport? And

      If you want to put the blame on someone (other than the other players who DO use PEDs), put it on Canseco. He’s the one who brought this whole thing into the light.

      • bfunk1978 - Jul 12, 2013 at 3:50 PM

        It should have never gotten to this point.

      • chip56 - Jul 13, 2013 at 11:26 PM

        But that it got here isn’t Selig’s fault

  7. vikes1980 - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:49 AM

    you are all right, it is sad that all players have to answer to this when they have great seasons, but with that said, after they bring it up…9 times out of 10 the player is using some type of PED… not saying he is, but you never know

    • sneschalmers - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:06 PM

      [citation needed]

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:10 PM

        Hey that’s my line!

        And awesome nick btw

      • sneschalmers - Jul 12, 2013 at 2:10 PM

        http://i.imgur.com/motMq.gif

  8. DelawarePhilliesFan - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:50 AM

    Yet another reason baseball needs a better testing regime – so the innocent don’t have to answer these questions

    • nategearhart - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:55 AM

      What’s wrong with the testing regime? It catches cheaters. It hasn’t caught Davis.

      • DelawarePhilliesFan - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:54 PM

        I am not PED expert, so I can’t say precisely how to fix the system, but they need something along the lines of cycling to create “bio passport” that effectively establishes a baseline for each player and says “this is what your blood should look like. If it ever deviates from this, you damn well better produce the doctor who altered it, along with the explanation of why”.

        Right now it is all whack-a-mole – you have to catch the person in the act. People look at that and will say “Hey Chris Davis (or Raul Ibanez), you just haven’t been caught is all”. And frankly, people have good reason to be skeptical.

      • Reflex - Jul 12, 2013 at 9:38 PM

        True, and its worked out so incredibly well for cycling that I think all sports should emulate their system…

        /sarcasm

  9. stlouis1baseball - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:05 PM

    I have often said this will always be the case (players being singled out…almost witch hunt style).
    It will continue until they somehow officially label the 90’s “the steroid era.”
    It stinks…but there isn’t any other way around it.

    Interestingly…
    In my local paper there was an article (in the last week) about Davis. Pretty much discussing exactly what this article is discussing. Davis said MLB has the toughest testing procedures in all of sports. He also said he considers Roger Maris as the single season home run champ.

  10. scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:07 PM

    This was a silly accusation the first time it was levied, and it’s silly now. There is absolutely no proof, no rational line of thought, no reasoning here. In fact, the reason for his impressive season is extremely simple and rational. But there’s columns to write and haters to hate, so here we are. I’m not sure exactly when, but we stopped looking at things at face value, stopped seeing the good in people. We now have a habit of holding people up only to tear them down. People don’t want to believe someone can improve through hard work and discipline, no it’s gotta be the easy way out for them. Everyone loves a good villain.

  11. boyofzimmer - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:10 PM

    Nobody deserves the benefit of the doubt any longer. This is MLB, it’s fair to wonder with this type of power production.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:14 PM

      Why is it fair? See the USA today article Craig eviscerates where many of us breakdown how little PED use is actually in game. If you don’t want to, here’s the numbers. Since ’06, when testing began, through ’12, there have been 27 MLB players busted for PEDs. Of those, two were repeat offenders (Guillermo Moto and Manny Ramirez). So 25 players out of 1200 each year. Assuming all those tests were in one year, that’s 2.1% of the population was caught.

      So I ask again, why is it fair?

      • chip56 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:19 PM

        Because MLB does not test blood which is the only way to confirm the use of certain PEDs.

        Because masking agents are always going to be ahead of the tests designed to catch them.

        None of that makes it fair for Chris Davis to have to answer these questions – but it doesn’t make reporters wrong for asking them.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:53 PM

        Because MLB does not test blood which is the only way to confirm the use of certain PEDs.

        Which ones are those? HGH is one, but it’s not a PED according to most scientific studies. What else would it catch? And is it worth the hassle to institute blood testing?

        Because masking agents are always going to be ahead of the tests designed to catch them.

        This is a red herring as there really aren’t any drugs that can “mask” the effect of drug use. Many people think hCG, the drug that Manny tested positive for is a “masking agent”, but it didn’t hide any effect of PED use.

      • ryanrockzzz - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:04 PM

        Agree with some of what Chip56 is saying here. The issue has nothing to do with Davis. I feel bad that he DOES have to answer those questions. Part of the problem is the history. Baseball fans are the best in any sport at taking an issue, and cherrypicking statistics to back up their point. The facts say yes, a large number of players haven’t been caught. Many people use this a justification that no one should ever have to answer a question about steroid use, and how dare you for asking. The flip side of this is to Chip’s point. If your testing methods are constantly being beaten by agents, and are not the most up to date, you can’t say your catching all the cheaters. You could be overlooking a vast majority, who knows? Until there is an unarguable answer, how can anyone answer this steroids thing in an absolute way? To me, that means you can’t appraoch it in an abolsute way. So I have no problem is someone asks Davis the question. It’s when someone accuses a player like Davis without any proof that I have a problem. That’s not FAIR to me. But asking the question, ” have you ever used PED’s” is certainly valid in my opinion.
        I support the notion Davis is not using PED’s…in 2009 he played in 113 games..hit 21 HR’s/2012 139 games and 33 HR’s…and obviously this year he’s shown further progression. He always had power potential when’s gotten the chance to play in a decent amount of games.

      • bigharold - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:05 PM

        “So I ask again, why is it fair?”

        Because the players caused this issue in the first place. No one is above suspicion. It unfortunate but it’s fair. Brutally fair.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:56 PM

        If your testing methods are constantly being beaten by agents, and are not the most up to date, you can’t say your catching all the cheaters.

        Listen, repeating it more than once doesn’t make it true. There’s no such thing as a “masking agent”. Take it away Will Carroll* (I’ll bold the important part):

        Also, let’s take this opportunity to close the books on masking agents. Simply put, there is no such thing. A substance or technique to beat drug tests doesn’t exist. You might as well call a unicorn or Sasquatch a masking agent if you’re going to use it the same way many have in covering this story. The substance hCG, as Ramirez used in 2009, obviously does not mask results. It is used in concert with other drugs to create a desired effect. In most cases, it’s used to keep the testicles from shrinking due to disuse by the endocrine system. (If Kim Bell is to be believed in her recent testimony, Barry Bonds wasn’t using hCG.) Modern drug tests are exceptionally accurate and precise; they can’t be fooled. However, it’s that very precision that makes the cat-and-mouse game of doping possible.

        For instance, pre-BALCO, drug testing for testosterone in certain sports was done a specific way. Many people know about testosterone, but not epitestosterone. Your body produces both, and within a certain ratio (can’t remember which to which, but we’ll say testosterone to epitestosterone to make a point) is considered normal. Let’s say the ratio is 4:1. Anything higher than that and you failed a test

        Now, the BALCO guys knew that all the test cared about was the RATIO, not the exact amounts. So let’s say a normal body has 4 part testosterone to 1 part testosterone. Know what the ratio of 64 parts testosterone to 16 parts epitestosterone comes out to? 4:1! You could have 16x the normal amount of testosterone in your system, and the test wouldn’t fail you b/c all it was looking at was the ratio. This is the cat and mouse game that Carroll is referring to.

        You could be overlooking a vast majority, who knows? Until there is an unarguable answer, how can anyone answer this steroids thing in an absolute way?

        Yes we could be, but I highly doubt it. Also you are effectively asking the players to prove a negative.

        *http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/will_carroll/04/10/week2.preview/index.html

      • stuckonwords - Jul 13, 2013 at 9:01 AM

        It’s fair because we’re seeing guys produce numbers that *beat* that 2.1%, Church. In other words, Chris and Miggy are doing something that a much smaller percentage than that have *ever* done. So any time numbers pop up that are an aberration from the statistical norm, given the as-yet-unfinished steroid use (the “era” is still ongoing), it’s completely fair to question.

        I am a complete fan-boy of Miguel Cabrera, I admit it. If you watch him 162 every year like I do, you’ll be blown away by the ease of his swing and the way he always times it so perfectly. And no PED on Earth can cause a guy to be as *smart* as he is at the plate. That guy can tell you what pitch the pitcher’s gonna throw next before the pitcher knows 9 out of 10 times (yes, yes…citation needed). If you watch him, you can just see that what he does isn’t just about his physique, but his baseball IQ.

        Having said all that, there’s no way I’d begrudge anyone from raising the question as to whether he’s one of the guys using PEDs. I think there’s a huge difference between raising the question and accusing, but it’s fair to ask the question. In Miggy’s case, I think if you watch him you’d see your answers.

        I honestly haven’t had the chance to watch Chris Davis for a period of years, so maybe people who have done so could see this incredible production coming. But I really can’t see how anyone could begrudge me wondering about it. If those who’ve watched him can vouch for his development the way I can Miggy (who’s done this stuff his whole career) and Scherzer, I’ll defer to their knowledge. But don’t get mad cuz I raise the question. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me me for a decade and a half, shame on me.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 13, 2013 at 9:50 AM

        So any time numbers pop up that are an aberration from the statistical norm, given the as-yet-unfinished steroid use (the “era” is still ongoing), it’s completely fair to question

        There are 30 teams with 25 players on them playing 162 games a season. Do you understand the possibilities of randomness this entails? You are talking about 100,000s of events every single year. Merely stating something is far away from the bell curve as justification for “questioning” is, unfortunately, a bit ignorant.

        Disregarding that, the best players in the game do things that are far beyond the bell curve. Ted Williams had a .526 OBP and .700+ SLG at age 38. Babe Ruth had a career .690 SLG. Hank Aaron hit 40 HR at age 39.

      • stuckonwords - Jul 13, 2013 at 2:39 PM

        “Merely stating something is far away from the bell curve as justification for “questioning” is, unfortunately, a bit ignorant.”

        Wow. You’re saying that when nobody in the history of baseball every had 30 home runs and 90 rbi’s by the All-Star break, and someone suddenly does, and it’s on the heels of a decade and a half of steroid abuse, that it’s *ignorant* to consider that justification to question it?

        Yes, when something is far away from the bell curve, it, by its very definition, means “out of norm”. When 60 home runs was the record for 30 years, and then it got broken BY ONE…….and then 61 home runs was the record for another 40ish years (so for 155 years that was the best anybody could ever do) and then suddenly someone puts up 73……when a guy never hits 50 home runs in 15 years in the Majors and then hits 73……

        Yes……when something is far outside the curve its a doggone good reason to question. It would ignorant not to.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 13, 2013 at 9:58 PM

        You’re saying that when nobody in the history of baseball every had 30 home runs and 90 rbi’s by the All-Star break, and someone suddenly does, and it’s on the heels of a decade and a half of steroid abuse, that it’s *ignorant* to consider that justification to question it?

        If Davis gets one RBI tomorrow, then two players THIS YEAR have done it. However, considering the ASG gets continually moved back in the season, AND the season is longer than before, using counting stats and wondering why the old time greats didn’t do it isn’t exactly an apples to apples comparison, wouldn’t you agree?

        Yes, when something is far away from the bell curve, it, by its very definition, means “out of norm”. When 60 home runs was the record for 30 years, and then it got broken BY ONE…….and then 61 home runs was the record for another 40ish years (so for 155 years that was the best anybody could ever do) and then suddenly someone puts up 73……when a guy never hits 50 home runs in 15 years in the Majors and then hits 73……

        I wonder what else happened in between all that time? More games played, more teams, smaller ballparks, tighter baseballs, better conditioning, better travel, better scouting, advanced video, better statistics.

        Could any of those have helped?

  12. chip56 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:11 PM

    Don’t blame the press for the fact that he has to deny PED usage. Blame the players who actually did use PEDs.

    • chip56 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:25 PM

      You can “thumbs down” the comment all you want. But the bottom line is that the question is not out of line.

      Sure, if he’s clean, it sucks that Davis (or any player) has to get asked the question. But I guarantee you that any player in Davis’ shoes a) knows the question is coming and b) understands why reporters have to ask it.

  13. youknowwhatsgoodforshoulderpain - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:32 PM

    It makes me sick to see people claiming he is a PED without any evidence. He was a good kid when he was with Texas and always had power, but he just couldn’t put it all together consistently behind the plate. Now that he has and can finally showcase that power, he’s a PED user?? That just doesn’t make any sense at all. PEDs don’t allow you to recognize pitches better. I just wish he’d come back to Texas! :)

  14. edgarallan926 - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:53 PM

    Disclaimer: Huge O’s fan here

    Let’s take a look at some numbers here, Albert Pujols arguably best “clean hitter” of past 15 years against Chris “Alleged Barry Bonds Jr” Davis:

    For people who mention (Rick Reilly) that Chris Davis has ALREADY beat career highs and how is he not doing steroids, this is his FIRST full season as a FULL-TIME player. As for the power potential:

    First Full season in minors
    Pujols (20 years old) – 19 HRs in 544 PA’s
    Davis (21 years old) – 36 HRs in 542 PA’s

    First Full season as FULL-TIME player
    Pujols (21 years old) – 37 HRs in 676 PA’s
    Davis (27 years old) – 34 HR’s and counting in 381 PA’s

    Davis hit a HR every 15 PA’s as a 21 year old in the minors and is now hitting one every 11 PA’s as a 27 year old. WOW, we sure ourselves an anomaly…let’s be real, this isn’t an outlier. You’re seeing a guy who is maturing as a hitter and hitting for power more consistently. I’m tired of people ruining such a fun season for O’s fans by even bringing this to the table.

    • jeffa43 - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:20 PM

      Albert was not clean… And has also lied about age.

      I can’t prove it, but their are more signs he was not clean…he is trying to hide the physical reprocusions today.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:59 PM

        Albert was not clean… And has also lied about age.

        I can’t prove it,

        Time to shut it down. Can’t get a better argument than this.

      • stlouis1baseball - Jul 12, 2013 at 3:01 PM

        Jeff:
        You forgot the sarcasm font at the end. Cause’ A.P was routinely tested. And admitted as much. Far more than other players as well (which he also went on record as saying).
        So yeah…sarcasm font.

  15. joestemme - Jul 12, 2013 at 12:53 PM

    All the “thumbs down” folks here are the same ones who trotted out the same line defending A-Roid, Ryan Braun, McGuire, Sosa, Bonds, Clemens, Armstrong, Marion Jones etc. etc. – “they have passed tests”.

    Uh, huh.

    Time will tell on Chris Davis. Of course, proof must be found. But, to just blankly dismiss any possible PED use on his part considering such a spike in HR’s is folly.

    • 18thstreet - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:32 PM

      Yes! I say we should execute him, just to be safe.

      • joestemme - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:58 PM

        DID YOU READ THE POST? :

        “Time will tell on Chris Davis. Of course, proof must be found”

        O’s fans and PED apologists can “thumbs down” myself and others raising questions, but, the fact remains that many of these apologists also cried foul when Bonds,Armstrong, A-Roid, Jones etc etc etc etc etc were accused……

      • 18thstreet - Jul 12, 2013 at 2:03 PM

        You know who else denies their guilt? Innocent people.

        But I think it’s better to slander a thousand innocent men than to enjoy a Baltimore Orioles team that’s better than I thought it would be.

  16. rockthered1286 - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:01 PM

    Here’s my issue with the Davis accustations- no reporter/sports writer/run of the mill troll is paying attention to anything other than inflated numbers for Davis. They aren’t acknowledging that his K’s are down substantially, his walks are up, and he’s been much more patient at the plate. Davis has always been a power hitter who, until last year, never got a full season to prove himself. He was stuck behind Moreand in Texas, came to Baltimore, and got stuck in a mess wih Reynolds and whoever the hell the O’s had DHing that year. Last year his numbers progressively got better as the season went on, then continued into this year. And again, it’s Davis’ plate discipline that have been the reason for his improvement and nothing else. He hit for power in the minors, in Texas and still in Baltimore.

    Here’s my question- why are reporters ignoring this and instead going right for the jugular with accusations of roids? Are they saying PEDs are helping his patience at the plate? Are they saying he is whiffing less because of it? Shock reporting generates more hits so I guess that’s all there is to it.

    • paperlions - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:47 PM

      Exactly. As usually, sadly, it is just intellectual laziness. They act like the only possible explanation for an increase in power production (not in an increase in power per se, just production associated with power) is PED use…when there are actually a LOT of aspects that can affect how a player’s power “plays up” in games…..just like there are a LOT of things that PED use can and does affect that are not HRs, but the media pretty much doesn’t give a shit about anything but HRs.

      Just sad and lazy “work”.

  17. paperlions - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:13 PM

    Settle down guys. These questions and accusations are being levied by a TRAINED PROFESSIONAL JOURNALIST….not some basement blogging nobody, so it is totally okay. Christine Bennan said so.

  18. buddysguys - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:50 PM

    Everyone is on roids.

  19. mc1439 - Jul 12, 2013 at 1:57 PM

    Steroids should be permissible if you aren’t all douchey about it. Davis is allowed cuz he’s not all douchey about being awesome. If your A roid of Braun-oid? than ya you suck and deserve to be suspended.

    • stlouis1baseball - Jul 12, 2013 at 4:39 PM

      “Steroids should be permissible if you aren’t all douchey about it.”

      Just one question:
      After typing that sentence…did you feel like a douche?

  20. rcali - Jul 12, 2013 at 3:37 PM

    He can thank his teammate Brian Roberts.

    • km9000 - Jul 12, 2013 at 6:34 PM

      And Tejada, and Palmeiro, and Brady Anderson…

      I’m glad Davis knew the reality of the situation, and didn’t get all indignant and offended. At the same time, there’s nothing he could say that would change the mind of skeptics.

      The smug media types bringing this up in the first place just seem to want to be able to say “I totally called that!” if he were busted, but it’s not like they’re going out on a limb.

  21. Kevin Gillman - Jul 12, 2013 at 6:56 PM

    I’ve said this before, and I will say it again, why doesn’t people….media and fans alike link football players to PHDs like they do to baseball? There is more than likely more doing that in NFL in Baseball. Just think of it like this, how about a veteran lineman trying to keep his job, while a young up and comer lineman tries to take it. You don’t think that is happening? If we accuse ANY and ALL Baseball players of using when they are having a career year, why can’t the same be said about Football players?

    • scotttheskeptic - Jul 12, 2013 at 7:52 PM

      That one is easy. Despite the NFL’s and media statements to the contrary, people actually CARE about baseball. (Gives me hope for the country.)

      • Kevin Gillman - Jul 12, 2013 at 8:18 PM

        I can appreciate that you care about baseball, but I don’t buy that theory. I am not just talking about the fans here, so perhaps it’s because fans care more about baseball, but I am also talking about the media. You really think Rick Reiley cares more about baseball than football? I don’t know. ESPN knows where their bread and butter is at, and that’s football. You see it all the time, so perhaps that lies the problem? Either way, are we all to believe that Jose Canseco created PHD’s in the 80’s, when there are books that was written in the 70’s about steroids and other drug problems in football, such as “North Dallas Forty”? I guess I am just tired of the bias from the media. Just enjoy the game, and if it comes out a player cheated THEN we can blast them all we want. But it’s just my opinion.

  22. ncpolister - Jul 12, 2013 at 7:33 PM

    …Umm, so the reason he didn’t use PEDs was because he hasn’t “felt the need to”?…Not because they are, oh by the way, against the rules and that would be cheating?…The logical implication being that, if he SHOULD, feel “the need to” at some point, he would?…

  23. scotttheskeptic - Jul 12, 2013 at 7:57 PM

    A family member asked me in late-May if I thought Domonic Brown was using PEDs, and I replied that he was finally getting the PAs and consistent playing time needed to establish himself as a player in MLB. Reviewing Davis’ stats tells me that the “surge” is not out of line with his early career numbers. He is once again an everyday player proving himself.

  24. steelcurtainwereonpedstoo - Jul 12, 2013 at 9:43 PM

    Juicer look at his enormous head!

  25. thenaturalmevs - Jul 12, 2013 at 11:29 PM

    Yea but the thing is…. he’s not clean.

    Just like all those other guys with ‘jump off the page’ seasons were not clean.

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